parenting | pg.2

Objects on Foot Are Closer Than They Appear

Ginny Figlar Colón by Ginny Figlar Colón | July 13th, 2012 | No Comments
topic: Family Health, Fitness, Green Living, Green Tech, Health & Wellness, Personal Growth, Weight Loss | tags: car, car-free, children, community, dad, drive, driving, exercise, exerise, family, Fitness, Google Maps, health, healthy, kids, mom, neighborhood, parenting, pedestrian-friendly, running errands, stroller, take a walk, walk score, walkability, walking, walking directions, WalkScore, weight-loss

Happy family walking togetherIt usually takes me seven minutes to get to my daughter’s preschool. Today, it took 27.

That’s because, for the first time in 18 months, I strapped my 11-month-old son into the double stroller and walked there.

I like to walk. Our family of four has one car, and in the two years that we’ve owned it, we’ve only put 14,000 miles on the odometer.

I’m not alone. According to a 2011 survey conducted by the National Association of Realtors, nearly 80 percent of respondents look for homes in pedestrian-friendly areas and 59 percent would choose a smaller home if it meant less driving.

Still, I find that once I’ve gotten into the habit of driving someplace — my daughter’s preschool, the Trader Joe’s on the other side of the highway, the garden store — I tend to keep on driving there, deeming it too far to reach on foot. The funny thing is, once I decide to test walking to a destination once, I realize not only how doable it is but also how satisfying running that errand becomes.

So now I’m on a quest of sorts: to debunk the myth that certain places in my everyday life are too far to reach on foot.

Kids Unleashed

Leslie Garrett by Leslie Garrett | June 5th, 2012 | 1 Comment
topic: Family Health, Fitness, Green Living, Health & Wellness | tags: abduction, asthma, bike to school, childhood obesity, Etan Patz, exercise, Fitness, high blood pressure, kids, milk carton, missing child, nature, outdoors, outside, parenting, physical activity, safety, stranger danger, type 2 diabetes, unsupervised children, walk to school

Group Of Children Running In Park

My nine-year-old is covered with mosquito bites, bruises and scratches. From the time she arrives home from school until I call her for dinner, she’s AWOL — running through woods, building forts out of sticks, catching toads … .

To hear some parents tell it, the fact that I haven’t a clue exactly where my nine-year-old is for an hour or more at a time is evidence of poor parenting, if not outright criminal neglect. And with a recent arrest in the cold case of six-year-old Etan Patz (the first missing child to have his face on a milk carton), this sentiment increasingly runs high.

Find Hope in Your Dream

Gwen Lawrence by Gwen Lawrence | May 18th, 2012 | 1 Comment
topic: Personal Growth, Relationships | tags: abuse, belief, child, childhood, desire, goals, HOPE, inspiration, kids, motivation, overcoming fear, parenting, perseverance, persevere, positive thinking, prayer, trauma, trust, Yoga


We all need it, we all have it, we all draw from it, we all seek it, and without it there is nothing left: hope.

The ability to persevere comes from inside — it is a part of you. When life throws you a curveball, when your path becomes a grinding mountain instead of a downhill glide, when there seems there is no way out, you must draw from your inner well of hope.

Whether to fulfill our goals or to fight to survive, we all draw from our same inner supply of hope. It is the first thing we should teach our children. Hope is a necessary component of survival and as sweet as hoping for a shiny red bicycle for Christmas.

Raising Hope-Full Children

Susan Stiffelman by Susan Stiffelman | May 18th, 2012 | No Comments
topic: Personal Growth, Relationships | tags: being present, children, confidence, confident, dad, families, family, HOPE, hopeful, mom, mother, optimistic, parent, parenting, Parenting Without Power Struggles, preteen, self confidence

Hopeful children

The first title I imagined for the parenting book I would someday write was Please Don’t Let the Light in Your Child’s Eyes Grow Dim. I had run into a 12-year-old girl whom I’d known at the age of four, when she was one of the brightest, most vibrant kids I had ever met. When I saw her at 12, I hardly recognized her. She was slumped into herself, subdued, and her light was … dim.

As I began writing, I was determined to articulate what I had come to understand about how to help children manifest their gifts and head into adulthood with joy and passion.

Hope and the Post-Baby Body

Nancy Alder by Nancy Alder | May 16th, 2012 | 2 Comments
topic: Fitness, Personal Growth, Yoga | tags: baby, children, Gaiam Hope Project, handstand, kids, Lao Tzu, mother, motherhood, parenting, Plank Pose, post-baby body, pre-baby body, pregnancy, pregnant, Samuel Smiles, strength, strong, Yoga, yoga class, yoga-practice

Hope and Post-Baby BodyKnowing others is intelligence; knowing yourself is true wisdom. Mastering others is strength; mastering yourself is true power.~Lao Tzu

Although all mothers know this, no one can truly warn you before it happens: Your body is never the same after you have a baby as it was before you got pregnant.

Sure, we see images of movie stars who bounce back from having babies more toned and fit than they were before pregnancy, but the reality for most women is much less seamless. Having a baby affects you inside and out: You stretch and move differently, and your anatomy changes — permanently — from that growing being inside your body. That pair of skinny jeans, your high school dress and your once stretch-mark-free body often become just a distant memory. This change can make women feel imperfect or less attractive than they remember themselves to be.

When I walked into the room for my first “official yoga class” (read: not with a DVD at home, which had been my practice for years) I felt weak. I was mom to a two-year-old and a four-year-old and I was out of shape. My stomach was flabby from cesarean sections, my leg muscles shaky and my self-image less than ideal. Feeling neither powerful nor like a rock star, I just hoped that yoga would help me get back the body I once had.

It wasn’t until the day that I held Plank Pose in yoga class that I finally got it: I still had an amazing body.

If You Give a Kid a Spatula …

Bevin Wallace by Bevin Wallace | May 16th, 2012 | No Comments
topic: Green Living, Healthy Eating | tags: cage-free eggs, children in the kitchen, csa, family meals, farm share, free-range chickens, getting kids to eat, healthy-eating, if you give a kid a spatula, If You Give a Mouse a Cookie, kids cook, local food, parenting, pastured eggs, pasturized eggs, sustainable farming

I hope my kids learn to cook. And love to it as much as I do.

I truly believe that one of the greatest gifts we can give our children is an appreciation for food. And by food, I mean real food — food that doesn’t come out of a can or microwaveable container. This hope is not just for my children; I hope more and more kids everywhere grow up with a renewed understanding of where food comes from and a respect for the plants and animals they eat.

Instead of citing studies about the rise of childhood obesity and rambling on about why teaching our kids to cook will make the world a better place, I’ve written a hopeful little story (with respectful credit due to Laura Joffe Numeroff and Felicia Bond, authors of many beloved children’s books, including, of course, If You Give a Mouse a Cookie). I hope you like it.

Cultivating a Dreamer

Leslie Garrett by Leslie Garrett | May 4th, 2012 | 3 Comments
topic: Family Health, Health & Wellness, Personal Growth, Relationships | tags: attention span, children, creativity, daydreams, dreamer, focus, future, grades, HOPE, imagination, kids, parenting, school, teachers

Daydreaming boyMy son is a dreamer. An absent-minded sort of kid who responds to every question with silence. Who’s always looking intently off in the distance or up at the ceiling. Then, when the question is repeated, he’ll look as if he’s just noticed you’re there and say, “Wha?”

It’s a trait that, not surprisingly, drives some of his teachers mad.

Under Her Skin: Pain Within and the Power of Hope

Jensy Scarola by Jensy Scarola | April 23rd, 2012 | 3 Comments
topic: Healthy Eating, Personal Growth, Relationships, Yoga | tags: counseling, depression, eating disorder, HOPE, light, love, marriage, meditation, parenting, post-partum depression, reader story, Relationships, stress, suicide, The Gaiam Hope Project, therapy, Yoga, yoga retreat


In the spring of 2007, after the birth of my second beautiful daughter, I relapsed from the eating disorder and severe depression I suffered with in college.

After six months of draining the lives of so many family and friends, I decided to receive intensive therapy once and for all. I was losing my husband, alienating friends and family members and spending days and weeks inside the house. I had two little girls to take care of and I could barely take care of myself.

Parenting Without Power Struggles: Susan Stiffelman on ‘The Today Show’

Susan Stiffelman by Susan Stiffelman | March 15th, 2012 | No Comments
topic: Family Health, Health & Wellness, Personal Growth, Relationships | tags: children, Hoda Kotb, Kathie Lee Gifford, kids, mom, mother, parenting, Parenting Without Power Struggles, Susan Stiffelman, temper tantrum, The Today Show, video

Parenting Without Power Struggles

Gaiam parenting blogger Susan Stiffelman appeared on The Today Show yesterday to chat with hosts Hoda Kotb and Kathie Lee Gifford about her book, Parenting Without Power Struggles. Watch the video of Susan explaining how to defuse a temper tantrum on the Today show website (or by clicking the image above) and learn more about the book (and sign up for Susan’s free parenting e-newsletter) on her website,

How to Find Your Parenting Cool When You’ve Temporarily Lost It

Susan Stiffelman by Susan Stiffelman | January 11th, 2012 | 2 Comments
topic: Personal Growth, Relationships | tags: anger, angry, child behavior, children, children's behavior, disappointment, discipline, expectation, family, forgiveness, healthy parenting, homework, kids, parenting, parents

Mother and daughter

It’s often said that we’re living with our best teacher, and nowhere is that more true than with our children. No one has the ability to push our buttons the way our kids do. And no one offers us the opportunity to practice the things we preach — about love, forgiveness and staying centered — like our kids do.

Every parent wants to stay cool, calm and collected. We don’t want to threaten to send them to bed without their supper when they’ve sassed back, or tell them they’re grounded for a month when — yet again — they refuse to honor their curfew. But taking a deep breath or counting to ten can seem almost impossible in the presence of kids who seem to know exactly how to push our biggest buttons.