criticism

Week 4: Feel the Love and a Better Body Image

Tanja Djelevic by Tanja Djelevic | March 12th, 2012 | 3 Comments
topic: Fitness | tags: 10-week program, bikini body, body-image, compassion, confidence, criticism, energy levels, exercise, Fitness, health, healthy, lose-weight, love your body, love yourself, motivation, negative thoughts, personal trainer, positive thinking, self confidence, self-love, spring training, week 4, week four, weeks, weight-loss, well-being, wellness

Love YourselfLove is one of the most powerful forces on Earth. Unfortunately, I find that women who are most critical of their bodies are missing a degree of self-love. Do you find yourself looking in the mirror and having negative thoughts about certain parts of your body? Do you find yourself saying things like, “If only my thighs were slimmer,” or “I wish my butt wasn’t so flat”?

When I teach my fitness classes, I often invite my students to do some of the exercises with their eyes closed in order to really feel the movement. On a neuromuscular level, training the body while creating positive thoughts and making that positive connection is scientifically proven to be one of the most powerful ways to create and reinforce a positive body image. And, on a non-scientific level, it just feels good!

Does This Blog Make Me Look Fat? When Inner Voices Aren’t Very Nice

Jill Miller by Jill Miller | November 8th, 2011 | 6 Comments
topic: Fitness, Health & Wellness, Healthy Eating, Personal Growth, Yoga | tags: anorexia, body-image, bulimia, criticism, disordered eating, eating disorders, fat acceptance, Geneen Roth, Gil Hedley, inner voices, kids, mental-health, parenting, parents, teens, weight, Yoga Tune Up®, young women

Eating DisorderHow I became the chubby kid

As a child, I was given free reign to eat whatever I wanted. This meant daily bowls of crushed oreos in milk, after-school snacks of burgers and fries as a “treat” for answering phones at the family business and, in the evening, half a pint of Haagen-Dazs for dessert. Every day I satisfied my “junk-food tooth” on top of my favorite past-times: reading, watching TV or playing with Barbies. Consequently I was that kid. The chubby one.

At the time, I didn’t have a lot of critical self-consciousness about it … I can’t remember inner voices telling me “you’re fat” or “if you eat that you’ll get fatter” (although I did always wear a T-shirt over my bathing suit). I say “inner voices” because there actually were some external voices saying these exact things to me, directly and out loud: my parents and grandparents. They saw my bulging belly, thick thighs and chipmunk cheeks and thought it went beyond cutesy “baby fat.”