children | pg.3

Yoga, Motherhood and Hope

Michelle Finerty by Michelle Finerty | April 27th, 2012 | 1 Comment
topic: Fitness, Personal Growth, Relationships, Yoga | tags: anticipation, calm, children, desire, detox, energy, expectation, faith, HOPE, kids, mom, mother, motherhood, motivation, peace, retreat, twists, Yoga, yoga for kids

Mother and daughter doing yogaHope, expectation, anticipation, the desire for a certain outcome. Hope is what moves us forward, motivates us and keeps our faith strong during the hard times. Hope is essential for our existence; yet there are times — when the world seems to be in a state of chaos — when it is easy to wonder where hope is.

In thinking about hope and how to find it in our world, I realized that for me, hope comes from my yoga practice and my kids, as both remind me on a constant basis that hope dwells within us, not outside of ourselves, and that in order to tap into that wellspring of hope, it is essential to find the peace within to let hope blossom.

Parenting Without Power Struggles: Susan Stiffelman on ‘The Today Show’

Susan Stiffelman by Susan Stiffelman | March 15th, 2012 | No Comments
topic: Family Health, Health & Wellness, Personal Growth, Relationships | tags: children, Hoda Kotb, Kathie Lee Gifford, kids, mom, mother, parenting, Parenting Without Power Struggles, Susan Stiffelman, temper tantrum, The Today Show, video

Parenting Without Power Struggles

Gaiam parenting blogger Susan Stiffelman appeared on The Today Show yesterday to chat with hosts Hoda Kotb and Kathie Lee Gifford about her book, Parenting Without Power Struggles. Watch the video of Susan explaining how to defuse a temper tantrum on the Today show website (or by clicking the image above) and learn more about the book (and sign up for Susan’s free parenting e-newsletter) on her website, ParentingWithoutPowerStuggles.com.

How to Find Your Parenting Cool When You’ve Temporarily Lost It

Susan Stiffelman by Susan Stiffelman | January 11th, 2012 | 2 Comments
topic: Personal Growth, Relationships | tags: anger, angry, child behavior, children, children's behavior, disappointment, discipline, expectation, family, forgiveness, healthy parenting, homework, kids, parenting, parents

Mother and daughter

It’s often said that we’re living with our best teacher, and nowhere is that more true than with our children. No one has the ability to push our buttons the way our kids do. And no one offers us the opportunity to practice the things we preach — about love, forgiveness and staying centered — like our kids do.

Every parent wants to stay cool, calm and collected. We don’t want to threaten to send them to bed without their supper when they’ve sassed back, or tell them they’re grounded for a month when — yet again — they refuse to honor their curfew. But taking a deep breath or counting to ten can seem almost impossible in the presence of kids who seem to know exactly how to push our biggest buttons.

“More, Peas!” One Mom’s Delicious Take on Plant-Based Dinners

Sarah Matheny by Sarah Matheny | August 24th, 2011 | 1 Comment
topic: Health & Wellness, Healthy Eating | tags: black bean burgers, children, cooking for kids, dairy free diet, family meals, family-style dining, feeding kids, healthy food, healthy-eating, meatless, meatless lasagna, meatless Mondays, milk free, organic food, organic foods, organic ingredients, Peas and Thank You, plant-based diet, Sarah Methany, sustainable diet, vegan, vegan recipes, vegetarian, vegetarian lasagna, vegetarian recipe

Boy eating vegetablesWhen Sarah Matheny, creator of the popular blog Peas and Thank You, decided to eliminate animal products from her diet, she knew there’d be skeptics. Her grandpa was a butcher and her mom cooked with no fear of butter. But now Sarah is a mom who wants to feed her children right. Her new book, also titled Peas and Thank You, is a collection of recipes and stories from a mainstream family eating a not-so-mainstream diet. It’s filled with healthy and delicious versions of your favorite foods, but with no meat, lots of fresh ingredients and plenty of nutrition for growing Peas. From wholesome breakfasts to mouth-watering desserts, it’s easier than ever to whip up crowd-pleasing meals that will have the whole family asking for “more, peas.” Here are Sarah’s thoughts on dinner, along with a few delicious recipes from the book.

Help Your Kids Fend Off Seasonal Allergies Naturally

Bevin Wallace by Bevin Wallace | May 13th, 2011 | 4 Comments
topic: Family Health, Health & Wellness | tags: allergies, allergy symptoms, anti-inflammatory foods, antihistamines, children, decongestants, free radical, hay fever, health, histamines, holistic, homeopathic, indoor air pollution, Indoor Air Quality, inflammatory, Integrative-medicine, kids, medications, natural drugs, natural medicines, natural remedies, OTC allergy medications, pollen, seasonal allergies, Spring, summer

Family in a field of wildflowers

For one in seven U.S. children, including my two, spring brings more than baseball practice and dirty feet — it also brings sneezing, congestion, itchy eyes, sore throats, coughing, and runny noses. Seasonal allergies (also known as hay fever or allergic rhinitis) occur when something in the air, such as tiny tree particles, grass, weeds or pollen, comes into contact with nose membranes and triggers inflammatory chemicals called histamines.

Green Your Family: A 5-Step Plan to Success

Leslie Garrett by Leslie Garrett | April 21st, 2011 | 4 Comments
topic: Green Living | tags: bicycle, bicycling, bike, car-pooling, carbon-footprint, cars, children, climate change, driving, eco-friendly, emissions, energy, environment, family, food miles, garbage, go green, investing, kids, local, money, new year's resolutions, parenting, planet, power, public transit, recycling, saving, showers, tele-commuting, trash, waste, water use

Family taking out the recycling

Was “go green” one of your New Year’s resolutions? Even if your composter is still empty and there are chemical cleaners still lurking in your cabinets, don’t fret — Only 12 percent of those who make New Year’s resolutions actually keep them for a year. Which, frankly, is 12 percent more than I would have guessed. But if you’re like me and the other 88 percent, what can help us keep resolutions is the support of others.

With that in mind, this Earth Day I’m enlisting my family in the greening goals I set for 2011. And by “greening” (aren’t we all just getting sick to death of that word?), I mean treading more lightly on my wallet, my Daytimer, my blood pressure and Mother Earth. Surely THAT’s a resolution worth fighting for!

Be Like a Kid: Making Exercise Fun Again

Chris Freytag by Chris Freytag | March 16th, 2011 | 24 Comments
topic: Family Health, Fitness, Health & Wellness | tags: children, dance workout, exercise partner, exercising outside, Fitness, fun exercise, kids, motivation, overcoming fear, walking, working out, workout buddy

Kids Outside Jumping

If you’re trying to add more activity and movement to your life, one place to look for inspiration is your children. When we were kids, we never said, “I have to go exercise.” We just wanted to play and move. Here are four things about being active and healthy that you can learn from kids:

Servin’ It Up Family Style

Bevin Wallace by Bevin Wallace | March 15th, 2011 | 1 Comment
topic: Family Health, Health & Wellness, Healthy Eating | tags: balanced diet, buffet, children, choices, cooking, decision-making, diet, different, dinner, family, family-style dining, father, food, food waste, healthy-eating, kids, kitchen table, manners, meals, mealtime, mother, motherhood, parenting, parents, pasta, patience, portions, recipe, salad, self-esteem, serving, sharing, sugar, supper, try, vegetables, water, water pitcher

Family-Style Dinner

I think it’s safe to say that one of the things we modern-day moms do a bit more than our moms did is baby our kids, especially when it comes to what they eat. Some of this is good, of course. Regulating intake of sugar and processed foods is probably not something best left up to people whose idea of a balanced meal is beef jerky and fruit snacks. But at some point, kids need to learn to make their own good choices, right? When and how we do that is each family’s decision, but for me the food thing was getting ridiculous.

Gourmet Is a Good Thing

Bevin Wallace by Bevin Wallace | January 31st, 2011 | No Comments
topic: Family Health, Green Living, Health & Wellness, Healthy Eating | tags: breakfast, childhood obesity, children, clean your plate, diet, dinner, environmental, food, force-feeding, fresh produce, fruits and vegetables, fun, gourmet, health, healthy-eating, hunger, hungry, in-season, ingredients, junk food, kids, local farms, lunch, meals, mother, organic, parenting, picky eater, processed, recipes, soup, sugar, sustainable, weight, whole grain

Boy eating dinner at a restaurantI know it might sound obnoxious at first and that I sound a little like Martha Stewart with that headline, but I like the idea of raising gourmet kids. By “gourmet,” I don’t mean kids who demand white tablecloths and truffle oil. What I mean is simply someone with an appreciation of good food. Here’s how Webster’s defines it:

Tucson, Christina, Healing and Rabbit Hole

Stephen Simon by Stephen Simon | January 17th, 2011 | No Comments
topic: Inspirational Media, Personal Growth, Relationships | tags: anger, child, children, Christina Green, courage, crisis, death, family, father, Film, friends, grace, grief, grieving, happiness, healing, HOPE, humanity, joy, kids, loss, marriage, mother, mourn, mourning, movie, parenting, parents, Rabbit Hole, Relationships, saddness, tragedy, tragic, Tucson

Still from the movie Rabbit Hole

As a parent and grandparent, I was very hesitant to watch Rabbit Hole because I knew that it focused on parents who were dealing with the death of their child. After much encouragement from my wife, Lauren, and one of our community members (Mark), and with the tragedy in Tucson in the background, we watched the film last night and were absolutely mesmerized.