worth

A Quote by William Shakespeare on rudeness and worth

You are not worth the dust which the rude wind Blows in your face.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: King Lear, IV, ii, 30

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on day and worth

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Gratiano speaks an infinite deal of nothing, more than any man in all Venice. His reasons are as two grains of wheat hid in two bushels of chaff: you shall seek all day ere you find them, and when you have them, they are not worth the search.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: The Merchant of Venice, Act 1, Scene 1

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on losing, possessions, value, virtue, and worth

For it so falls out That what we have we prize not to the worth Whiles we enjoy it, but being lack'd and lost, Why, then we rack the value, then we find The virtue that possession would not show us Whiles it was ours.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Much Ado About Nothing

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on action, deed, doubt, friendship, good, honor, love, men, power, privacy, reason, speech, wit, words, and worth

Good friends, sweet friends, let me not stir you up To such a sudden flood of mutiny. They that have done this deed are honourable: What private griefs they have, alas! I know not, That made them do it; they are wise and honourable, And will no doubts with reason answer you. I come not, friends, to steal away your hearts: I am no orator, as Brutus is; But, as you know me all, a plain blunt man, That love my friend; and that they know full well That gave me public leave to speak of him: For I have neither wit, nor words, nor worth, Action, nor utterance, nor power of speech, To stir men's blood; I only speak right on; I tell you that which you yourselves do know; Show you sweet Caesar's wounds, poor poor dumb mouths, And bid them speak for me: but were I Brutus, And Brutus Antony, there were an Antony Would ruffle up your spirits and put a tongue In every wound of Caesar that should move The stones of Rome to rise and mutiny.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Julius Cæsar, Mark Antony in Act 3, scene 2.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on love, marriage, time, worth, steadfastness, and star

Let me not to the marriage of true minds
Admit impediments. Love is not love
Which alters when it alteration finds,
Or bends with the remover to remove:
O, no! it is an ever-fixed mark,
That looks on tempests and is never shaken.
It is the star to every wandering bark,
Whose worth's unknown, although his height be taken.
Love's not Time's fool, though rosy lips and cheeks
Within his bending sickle's compass come;
Love alters not with his brief hours and weeks,
But bears it out even to the edge of doom,
If this be error, and upon me prov'd,
I never writ, nor no man ever lov'd.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Sonnet 116

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on action, angels, day, deed, doubt, envy, friendship, good, heart, honor, ingratitude, judgment, kindness, love, men, nobility, overcoming, perception, pity, power, preparation, privacy, reason, soul, speech, tears, time,

If you have tears, prepare to shed them now. You all do know this mantle: I remember The first time ever Caesar put it on; 'Twas on a summer's evening, in his tent, That day he overcame the Nervii: Look, in this place ran Cassius' dagger through: See what a rent the envious Casca made: Through this the well-beloved Brutus stabb'd; And as he pluck'd his cursed steel away, Mark how the blood of Caesar follow'd it, As rushing out of doors, to be resolved If Brutus so unkindly knock'd, or no; For Brutus, as you know, was Caesar's angel: Judge, O you gods, how dearly Caesar loved him! This was the most unkindest cut of all; For when the noble Caesar saw him stab, Ingratitude, more strong than traitors' arms, Quite vanquish'd him: then burst his mighty heart; And, in his mantle muffling up his face, Even at the base of Pompey's Statua, Which all the while ran blood, great Cæsar fell, O! what a fall was there, my countrymen; Then I, and you, and all of us fell down, Whilst bloody treason flourish'd over us. O! now you weep, and I perceive you feel The dint of pity; these are gracious drops. Kind souls, what, weep you when you but behold Our Caesar's vesture wounded? Look you here, Here is himself, marr'd, as you see, with traitors. . . . . Good friends, sweet friends, let me not stir you up To such a sudden flood of mutiny. They that have done this deed are honourable: What private griefs they have, alas! I know not, That made them do it; they are wise and honourable, And will no doubts with reason answer you. I come not, friends, to steal away your hearts: I am no orator, as Brutus is; But, as you know me all, a plain blunt man, That love my friend. . . . . For I have neither wit, nor words, nor worth, Action , nor utterance, nor power of speech, To stir men's blood; I only speak right on; I tell you that which you yourselves do know.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Julius Cæsar, Mark Antony in Act 3, scene 2.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William R. Bradford on entertainment, fatherhood, home, learning, people, worth, and path

Young people must learn that none of the exciting and entertaining fun things are worth it if they take you off the path that will lead you back home to your Heavenly Father.

William R. Bradford (1933 -)

Source: Friend June, 1992, “They Spoke to Us” © by Intellectual Reserve, Inc.Used by permission.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Matthews on day, laws, success, talent, and worth

One wellcultivated talent, deepened and enlarged, is  worth 100 shallow faculties. The first law of success in this day, when so many things are clamoring for attention, is concentration-to bend all the energies to one point, and to go directly to that point, looking neither to the right nor to the left.

William Matthews

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William James on belief, facts, life, and worth

Believe that life is worth living, and your belief will help create the fact.

William James (1842 - 1910)

Source: Pearls of Wisdom

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William James on life and worth

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This life is worth living, we can say, since it is what we make it, from the moral point of view.

William James (1842 - 1910)

Source: The Verities of Religious Experience, 1902

Contributed by: Zaady

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