words

A Quote by Blaise Pascal on meaning and words

Words differently arranged have a different meaning and meanings differently arranged have a different effect.

Blaise Pascal (1623 - 1662)

Source: W. H. Auden and L. Kronenberger (eds.) The Viking Book of Aphorisms, New York: Viking Press, 1966.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Bill William Henry Cosby on graduation, people, wishes, and words

People will frighten you about a graduation. . . . They use words you don't hear often . . . "And we wish you Godspeed." It is a warning, Godspeed. It means you are no longer welcome here at these prices.

Bill Cosby (1937 -)

Source: Southern Methodist University Graduation, 1995

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Bertrand Arthur William Russell on acceptance, change, common sense, democracy, education, ignorance, insincerity, language, life, mathematics, meaning, needs, philosophy, physics, understanding, and words

The doctrine, as I understand it, consists in maintaining that the language of daily life, with words used in their ordinary meanings, suffices for philosophy, which has no need of technical terms or of changes in the significance of common terms. I find myself totally unable to accept this view. I object to it: 1.Because it is insincere; 2.Because it is capable of excusing ignorance of mathematics, physics and neurology in those who have had only a classical education; 3.Because it is advanced by some in a tone of unctuous rectitude, as if opposition to it were a sin against democracy; 4.Because it makes philosophy trivial; 5.Because it makes almost inevitable the perpetuation amongst philosophers of the muddle-headedness they have taken over from common sense.

Bertrand Russell (1872 - 1970)

Source: Portraits from Memory, Russell

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Bertrand Arthur William Russell on language, life, logic, mathematics, physics, and words

Ordinary language is totally unsuited for expressing what physics really asserts, since the words of everyday life are not sufficiently abstract. Only mathematics and mathematical logic can say as little as the physicist means to say.

Bertrand Russell (1872 - 1970)

Source: The Scientific Outlook, 1931.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Bertrand Arthur William Russell on babies, day, history, schools, and words

I found, one day in school, a boy of medium size ill-treating a smaller boy. I expostulated, but he replied: 'The bigs hit me, so I hit the babies; that's fair.' In these words he epitomized the history of the human race.

Bertrand Russell (1872 - 1970)

Source: Education and the Social Order

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Bernard Eugene Meland on awareness, children, conviction, creativity, experience, language, life, men, motherhood, words, and yielding

It is my conviction, and in this I think I concur with both James and Whitehead, that we participate in this Creative Passage as bodily event at a depth and fullness not manageable at the cognitive level. . . . In all of [life] there are depths of awareness accompanying the bodily event of living and experience that yield conditions of knowing which language may not convey, or, for that matter, cannot convey. Whitehead expressed this point in those memorable words, "Mothers can ponder many things in their hearts which their lips cannot express." [Cf. Luke 2:51.] Meland continues this passage by speaking of ways in which men, children, and adolescents, also, ponder experiences which they cannot express verbally.

Bernard Meland (1871 - 1993)

Source: 1976

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Benjamin Franklin on action, meaning, wit, and words

Words may show a man's wit but actions his meaning.

Benjamin Franklin (1706 - 1790)

Source: Poor Richard’s Almanac

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Benjamin Franklin on words

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A word to the wise is enough, and many words won't fill a bushel.

Benjamin Franklin (1706 - 1790)

Source: Poor Richard’s Almanac, 1758, Preface: Courteous Reader

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Benjamin Franklin on desires, money, time, wealth, and words

In short, the way to wealth, if you desire it, is as plain as the way to market. It depends chiefly on two words, industry and frugality; that is, waste neither time nor money, but make the best use of both.

Benjamin Franklin (1706 - 1790)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Benjamin Franklin on reason and words

Here comes the orator with his flood of words and his drop of reason.

Benjamin Franklin (1706 - 1790)

Contributed by: Zaady

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