wit

A Quote by William Shakespeare on action, angels, day, deed, doubt, envy, friendship, good, heart, honor, ingratitude, judgment, kindness, love, men, nobility, overcoming, perception, pity, power, preparation, privacy, reason, soul, speech, tears, time,

If you have tears, prepare to shed them now. You all do know this mantle: I remember The first time ever Caesar put it on; 'Twas on a summer's evening, in his tent, That day he overcame the Nervii: Look, in this place ran Cassius' dagger through: See what a rent the envious Casca made: Through this the well-beloved Brutus stabb'd; And as he pluck'd his cursed steel away, Mark how the blood of Caesar follow'd it, As rushing out of doors, to be resolved If Brutus so unkindly knock'd, or no; For Brutus, as you know, was Caesar's angel: Judge, O you gods, how dearly Caesar loved him! This was the most unkindest cut of all; For when the noble Caesar saw him stab, Ingratitude, more strong than traitors' arms, Quite vanquish'd him: then burst his mighty heart; And, in his mantle muffling up his face, Even at the base of Pompey's Statua, Which all the while ran blood, great Cæsar fell, O! what a fall was there, my countrymen; Then I, and you, and all of us fell down, Whilst bloody treason flourish'd over us. O! now you weep, and I perceive you feel The dint of pity; these are gracious drops. Kind souls, what, weep you when you but behold Our Caesar's vesture wounded? Look you here, Here is himself, marr'd, as you see, with traitors. . . . . Good friends, sweet friends, let me not stir you up To such a sudden flood of mutiny. They that have done this deed are honourable: What private griefs they have, alas! I know not, That made them do it; they are wise and honourable, And will no doubts with reason answer you. I come not, friends, to steal away your hearts: I am no orator, as Brutus is; But, as you know me all, a plain blunt man, That love my friend. . . . . For I have neither wit, nor words, nor worth, Action , nor utterance, nor power of speech, To stir men's blood; I only speak right on; I tell you that which you yourselves do know.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Julius Cæsar, Mark Antony in Act 3, scene 2.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Cowper on home and wit

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His wit invites you by his looks to come, But when you knock, it never is at home.

William Cowper (1731 - 1800)

Source: Conversation. Line 303.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Cowper on genius and wit

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Manner is all in all, whate'er is writ, The substitute for genius, sense, and wit.

William Cowper (1731 - 1800)

Source: Table Talk. Line 542.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by François Marie Arouet Voltaire on wit, sayings, and quotes

A witty saying proves nothing.

Voltaire (1694 - 1778)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by unknown on children, cleverness, friendship, grace, justice, knowledge, laughter, life, love, music, tenderness, and wit

What seems to grow fairer to me as life goes by is the love and the grace and tenderness of it; not its wit and cleverness and grandeur of knowledge - grand as knowledge is - but just the laughter of children, and the friendship of friends, and the cozy talk by the fire, and sight of flowers, and the sound of music.

unknown

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by unknown on automobiles, observation, past, and wit

Speaking of automobiles, some wit has observed; many freeways have three lanes. There's a left lane, a right lane and the one you're trapped in when you go past your exit.

unknown

Source: Albert W. Daw Collection

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by unknown on cats, danger, food, mortality, time, wisdom, and wit

Once upon a time a cat who prided herself on her wit and wisdom was prowling about the barn in search of food and saw a tail protruding from a hole. "There is the conclusion of a rat," she said. Then she crept stealthily toward it until within striking distance, when she made a jump and reached it with her claws. Alas! it was not the appendage of a rat, but the tail of a snake, who immediately turned and gave her a mortal bite. And if such a story has a moral, it surely must be that it is indeed dangerous to jump at conclusions.

unknown

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by unknown on character, conscience, cruelty, effort, falsehood, generosity, injustice, judgment, knowledge, lies, men, nature, purity, slander, and wit

Always remember, no one can debase you but yourself. Slander, satire, falsehood, injustice-these can never rob you of your manhood. Men may lie about you, they may denounce you, they may cherish suspicions manifold, they may make your failings the target of their wit or cruelty. Never be alarmed; never swerve an inch from the line your judgment and conscience have marked out for you. They cannot, by all their efforts, take away your knowledge of yourself, the purity of your character, and the generosity of your nature. While these are left, you are unharmed.

unknown

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Jefferson on consequences, corruption, country, destruction, power, and wit

Our country is now taking so steady a course as to show by what road it will pass to destruction, to wit: by consolidation [of power] first, and then corruption, its necessary consequence.

Thomas Jefferson (1743 - 1826)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Fuller on wit

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Their heads sometimes so little that there is no room for wit; sometimes so long that there is no wit for so much room.

Thomas Fuller (1608 - 1661)

Source: Of Natural Fools.

Contributed by: Zaady

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