wit

A Quote by William Shakespeare on brevity, soul, and wit

Brevity is the soul of wit

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Hamlet, excerpt

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on wit

in

How now, wit! wither wander you?

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: As You Like It, Act I, sc. 2

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on belief, christianity, and wit

Methinks sometimes I have no more wit than a Christian or an ordinary man has; but I am a great eater of beef, and I believe that does harm to my wit.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Twelfth Night

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on foolishness and wit

Better a witty fool than a foolish wit.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Twelfth Night, Act 1, Scene 5

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on wit and wives

in

A man that had a wife with such a wit, he might say "Wit, whither, wilt?"

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: As You Like It, Act 4, scene 1.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on art, contentment, friendship, good, learning, money, nature, philosophy, and wit

Hast any philosophy in thee shepherd? .• • • • . . . He that wants money, means and content, is without three good friends; that the property of rain is to wet and fire to burn; that good pasture makes fat sheep, and a great cause of the night is lack of the sun; that he that hath learned no wit by nature nor art may complain of good breeding or comes of a very dull kindred.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: AS YOU LIKE IT, Act 3, Scene 2

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on dreams, past, and wit

I have had a dream, past the wit of man to say what dream it was.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: A MIDSUMMER NIGHT'S DREAM, Act 4, Scene 1

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on wit

in

You have a nimble wit; I think 'twas made of Atlanta's heels.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: As You Like It, Act 3, Scene 2

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on action, deed, doubt, friendship, good, honor, love, men, power, privacy, reason, speech, wit, words, and worth

Good friends, sweet friends, let me not stir you up To such a sudden flood of mutiny. They that have done this deed are honourable: What private griefs they have, alas! I know not, That made them do it; they are wise and honourable, And will no doubts with reason answer you. I come not, friends, to steal away your hearts: I am no orator, as Brutus is; But, as you know me all, a plain blunt man, That love my friend; and that they know full well That gave me public leave to speak of him: For I have neither wit, nor words, nor worth, Action, nor utterance, nor power of speech, To stir men's blood; I only speak right on; I tell you that which you yourselves do know; Show you sweet Caesar's wounds, poor poor dumb mouths, And bid them speak for me: but were I Brutus, And Brutus Antony, there were an Antony Would ruffle up your spirits and put a tongue In every wound of Caesar that should move The stones of Rome to rise and mutiny.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Julius Cæsar, Mark Antony in Act 3, scene 2.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on brevity, soul, and wit

Therefore, since brevity is the soul of wit, And tediousness the limbs and outward flourishes, I will be brief:

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Hamlet, Act 2, scene 2. 1602

Contributed by: Zaady

Syndicate content