virtue

A Quote by Alexander Pope on art, boldness, genius, heart, mankind, soul, tragedy, and virtue

To wake the soul by tender strokes of art, To raise the genius, and to mend the heart; To make mankind, in conscious virtue bold, Live o'er each Seene, and be what they behold: For this the Tragic Muse first trod the stage.

Alexander Pope (1688 - 1744)

Source: Prologue to Mr. Addison's Cato, 1713

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alexander Pope on apathy, boasts, exercise, laziness, mind, rest, strength, and virtue

In lazy apathy let stoics boast Their virtue fix'd: 't is fix'd as in a frost; Contracted all, retiring to the breast; But strength of mind is exercise, not rest.

Alexander Pope (1688 - 1744)

Source: Essay on Man. Epistle ii. Line 101.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alexander Pope on happiness, truth, and virtue

Know then this truth, enough for man to know virtue alone is happiness below.

Alexander Pope (1688 - 1744)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alexander Pope on age, devil, god, men, sacrifice, and virtue

When men grow virtuous in their old age, they only make a sacrifice to God of the devil's leavings.

Alexander Pope (1688 - 1744)

Source: Thoughts on Various Subjects

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alfred Jules Ayer on certainty, facts, logic, mathematics, principles, purity, purpose, questions, and virtue

A point which is not sufficiently brought out by Russell, if indeed it is recognized by him at all, is that every logical proposition is valid in its own right. Its validity does not depend upon its being incorporated in a system, and deduced from certain propositions which are taken as self-evident. The construction of systems of logic is useful as a means of discovering and certifying analytic propositions, but it is not in principle essential even for this purpose. For it is possible to conceive of a symbolism in which every analytic proposition could be seen to be analytic in virtue of its form alone. The fact that the validity of an analytic proposition in no way depends on its being deducible from other analytic propositions is our justification for disregarding the question whether the propositions of mathematics are reducible to propositions of formal logic, in the way that Russell supposed (1919, chap. 2). For even if it is the case that the definition of a cardinal number as a class of classes similar to a given class is circular, and it is not possible to reduce mathematical notions to purely logical notions, it will still remain true that the propositions of mathematics are analytic propositions. They will form a special class of analytic propositions, containing special terms, but they will be none the less analytic for that. For the criterion of an analytic proposition is that its validity should follow simply from the definition of the terms contained in it, and this condition is fulfilled by the propositions of pure mathematics.

A.J. Ayer

Source: Language Truth and Logic, Ayer, Ch.4, p.108

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on extremism, government, people, and virtue

While the people retain their virtue, and vigilance, no administration, by any extreme of wickedness or folly, can very seriously injure the government, in the short space of four years.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Source: first inaugural address (final text), March 4, 1861.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on blessings, god, grace, heaven, imagination, nations, necessity, peace, power, prosperity, success, superiority, virtue, wealth, and wisdom

We have been the recipients of the choicest bounties of Heaven. We have been preserved, these many years, in peace and prosperity. We have grown in numbers, wealth and power, as no other nation has ever grown. But we have forgotten God. We have forgotten the gracious hand which preserved us in peace, and multiplied and enriched and strengthened us; and we have vainly imagined, in the deceitfulness of our hearts, that all these blessings were produced by some superior wisdom and virtue of our own, intoxicated with unbroken success, we have become too self-sufficient to feel the necessity of redeeming and preserving grace, too proud to pray to the God that made us!

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Source: proclamation of National Fast Day, March 30, 1863.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by 'Abd al-Kader on affliction, certainty, desires, direction, evil, faith, fear, generosity, god, grace, hell, hope, order, paradise, people, prophets, purity, sacred, sharing, sufi, virtue, work, and world

. . . Whoever adores Allah through the fears of the fires of hell or in order to gain Paradise, whoever invokes Him in order that his share in the goods of the world be enlarged, or so that people should turn their faces toward him in order that he be glorified, or to avoid the evil which an oppressor afflicts upon him; or further, if he has heard a hadith* of the Prophet according to which he who accomplishes a certain pious work, or recites a certain invocation, will receive from God some recompense - whoever does this, his adoration is tainted, and it will not be acceptable to God except by virtue of His grace and of His generosity. . . . God said, "Whoever hopes to encounter his Lord, let him do pious works and, in the adoration of his Lord, not associate any being with Him." (Koran 18:110) The things which I have mentioned are the "beings" which are associated with God. Now, God is, of all those that are associated in adoration, the One who absolutely transcends all association. That is why He prescribed to all His servants that they adore Him with a perfectly pure faith which implies the desire for no other recompense than His face. . . . *hadith: A saying of the Prophet transmitted outside the Qur'an through a chain of known intermediaries. There are two kinds of hadith: hadith qudsi (sacred sentence), a direct revelation, in which God speaks in the first person by the mouth of the Prophet, and hadith nabawi (prophetic sentence), an indirect revelation in which the Prophet speaks as himself. (Introduction to Sufism, p. 117)

'Abd al-Kader (1807 - 1883)

Source: The Spiritual Writings of 'Abd al-Kader, 1995, Kitab al-Mawaqif, 4, pp. 37-38

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by A. J. Cronin on achievement, defeat, victory, and virtue

The virtue of all achievement is victory over oneself. Those who know this can never know defeat.

A. J. Cronin

Contributed by: Zaady

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