violence

A Quote by Deepak Chopra on violence

People get violent when 3 things happen:

1. When their personal safety or survival is affected
2. When their family's safety or survival is affected
3. When their way of life is drastically affected

Then people have this survival instinct and they become violent.

When I see violence I ask myself the following questions: How can I make that person feel safe? How can I make that person feel safe with their family? How can I not interfere with their way of life?

If we could do this with our perceived enemies we would not have to have a war on terror.

Deepak Chopra

Source: http://unityonline.org/members/deepak/index.html (week 4)

Contributed by: Allysho

A Quote by Dean Koontz on virtue, evil, kindness, violence, and preservation

Living in the modern age,
death for virtue is the wage.
So it seems in darker hours.
Evil wins, kindness cowers.

Ruled by violence and vice
we all stand upon thin ice.
Are we brave or are we mice,
here upon such thin, thin ice?

Dare we linger, dare we skate?
Dare we laugh or celebrate,
knowing we may strain the ice?
Preserve the ice at any price?

Dean Koontz

Source: Book of Counted Sorrows

Contributed by: Jennifer

A Quote by Helen Tworkov on blame, violence, boogeyman, buddha, change, victim, and ignorance

We are not innocent children victimized by a big bad world; if our world is big and bad, we made it that way. This is what the Buddha taught. The “other” is the child's boogeyman, the projection of our own fears onto a terrifying object of our imagination, which in turn terrorizes us. Our ignorance is not seeing that we are the other. We cannot afford to confuse innocence with this ignorance. Violence is not a permanent, immutable, fixed object. It is a state of mind, an expression of ignorance, with no more solid substance than a cloud. We cannot make a frontal attack on violence. Even protecting ourselves from it fuels its boogeyman existence. But the Buddha taught that we can change. This was his good news: that there is a way to alleviate suffering by freeing our minds from greed, anger, and ignorance. Yet until we apprehend the ways in which we are Oklahoma City, the bombs and the baby bears, the victims and the violators, we will continue to blame “them,” all the while proclaiming our innocence and evading our responsibilities.

Helen Tworkov

Contributed by: David

A Quote by Theodore Roszak on non-violence and violence

"People try non-violence for a week, and when it 'does not work'
they go back to violence which hasn't worked for centuries.'

~~Theodore Roszak...

Theodore Roszak

Contributed by: mimi

A Quote by Count Leo Nikolaevich Tolstoi or Tolstoy on government, violence, and state

In former times the chief method of justifying the use of violence and thereby infringing the law of love was by claiming a divine right for the rulers: the Tsars, Sultans, Rajahs, Shahs and other heads of states.

Leo Tolstoy (1828 - 1910)

Source: A Letter to a Hindu

Contributed by: Timmy Gun

A Quote by Shauna Singh Baldwin on violence, abuse, control, and oppression

The kind of violence one should fear is always quiet and comes all wrapped up in words like Love until you live with it daily and you value only that which is valuable to the violator.

Shauna Singh Baldwin

Source: English Lessons and Other Stories

Contributed by: loneturtle

A Quote by Parker Thomas Moon on politics, war, violence, government, and abstraction

When one uses the simple monosyllabic 'France' one thinks of France as a unit, an entity. When. . . we say 'France sent her troops to conquer Tunis'—we impute not only unity but personality to the country. The very words conceal the facts and make international relations a glamorous drama in which personalized nations are the actors, and all too easily we forget the flesh-and- blood men and women who are the true actors.. . if we had no such word as 'France' . . . then we should more accurately describe the Tunis expedition in some such way as this: 'A few of...thirty-eight million persons sent thirty thousand others to conquer Tunis.' This way of putting the fact immediately suggests a question, or rather a series of questions. Who are the 'few'? Why did they send the thirty thousand to Tunis? And why did these obey? Empire-building is done not by 'nations,' but by men. The problem before us is to discover the men, the active, interested minorities in each nation, who are directly interested in imperialism and then to analyze the reasons why the majorities pay the expenses and fight the wars.

Parker Moon

Source: Imperialism and World Politics (New York: Macmillan, 1930), p. 58.

Contributed by: peter

A Quote by Ludwig von Mises on government, state, violence, freedom, liberty, and slavery

Planning other people’s actions means to prevent them from planning for themselves, means to deprive them of their essentially human quality, means enslaving them.

Ludwig von Mises

Source: Mises, Ludwig Von (1962). The Ultimate foundation of Economic Science (2nd ed.). Foundation of Economic Education: Irvington-on-Hudson, NY. p. 129

Contributed by: peter

A Quote by Ludwig von Mises on violence, governmen, society, civilization, liberty, freedom, socialism, and collectivism

It is a double-edged makeshift to entrust an individual or a group of individuals with the authority to resort to violence. The enticement implied is too tempting for a human being. The men who are to protect the community against violent aggression easily turn into the most dangerous aggressors. They transgress their mandate. They misuse their power for the oppression of those whom they were expected to defend against oppression. The main political problem is how to prevent the police power from becoming tyrannical. This is the meaning of all the struggles for liberty. The essential characteristic of Western civilization that distinguishes it from the arrested and petrified civilizations of the East was and is its concern for freedom from the state. The history of the West, from the age of the Greek πόλις [city-state] down to the present-day resistance to socialism, is essentially the history of the fight for liberty against the encroachments of the officeholders.

Ludwig von Mises

Source: Mises, Ludwig Von (1962). The Ultimate foundation of Economic Science (2nd ed.). Foundation of Economic Education: Irvington-on-Hudson, NY. p. 99-100

Contributed by: peter

A Quote by Ludwig von Mises on government, state, violence, and paradox

Government and state can never be perfect because they owe their raison d’être to the imperfection of man and can attain their end, the elimination of man’s innate impulse to violence, only by recourse to violence, the very thing they are called upon to prevent.

Ludwig von Mises

Source: Mises, Ludwig Von (1962). The Ultimate foundation of Economic Science (2nd ed.). Foundation of Economic Education: Irvington-on-Hudson, NY. p. 99

Contributed by: peter

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