thought

A Quote by Ambrose Gwinett Bierce on accuracy, authors, birds, feeling, thought, and writing

GOOSE, n. A bird that supplies quills for writing. These [quills] when inked and drawn mechanically across paper by a person called an "author," there results a very fair and accurate transcript of the fowl's thought and feeling.

Ambrose Bierce (1842 - 1914)

Source: The Devil's Dictionary by Ambrose Bierce

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ambrose Gwinett Bierce on conformity, independence, and thought

ABNORMAL, adj. Not conforming to standard. In matters of thought and conduct, to be independent is to be abnormal, to be abnormal is to be detested. Wherefore the lexicographer adviseth a striving toward the straiter [sic] resemblance of the Average Man

Ambrose Bierce (1842 - 1914)

Source: The Devil's Dictionary by Ambrose Bierce

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Allan Ramsay on thinking and thought

Apothegms to thinking minds are the seeds from which spring vast fields of new thought, that may be further cultivated, beautified, and enlarged.

Allan Ramsay (1686 - 1758)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alfred North Whitehead on mathematics, purity, and thought

The point of mathematics is that in it we have always got rid of the particular instance, and even of any particular sorts of entities. So that for example, no mathematical truths apply merely to fish, or merely to stones, or merely to colours. So long as you are dealing with pure mathematics, you are in the realm of complete and absolute abstraction. . . . Mathematics is thought moving in the sphere of complete abstraction from any particular instance of what it is talking about.

Alfred Whitehead (1861 - 1947)

Source: Science and the Modern World

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A Quote by Alfred North Whitehead on aim, laws, patience, progress, science, thought, and world

The progress of Science consists in observing interconnections and in showing with a patient ingenuity that the events of this ever-shifting world are but examples of a few general relations, called laws. To see what is general in what is particular, and what is permanent in what is transitory, is the aim of scientific thought.

Alfred Whitehead (1861 - 1947)

Source: An Introduction to Mathematics.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alfred North Whitehead on common sense, creativity, ideas, originality, thought, words, and work

Now in creative thought common sense is a bad master. Its sole criterion for judgement is that the new ideas shall look like the old ones. In other words it can only work by suppressing originality.

Alfred Whitehead (1861 - 1947)

Source: An Introduction to Mathematics

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alfred North Whitehead on accidents, character, language, necessity, purpose, reason, relatives, and thought

Algebra reverses the relative importance of the factors in ordinary language. It is essentially a written language, and it endeavors to exemplify in its written structures the patterns which it is its purpose to convey. The pattern of the marks on paper is a particular instance of the pattern to be conveyed to thought. The algebraic method is our best approach to the expression of necessity, by reason of its reduction of accident to the ghostlike character of the real variable.

Alfred Whitehead (1861 - 1947)

Source: W.H. Auden and L. Kronenberger The Viking Book of Aphorisms, New York: Viking Press, 1966.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alfred North Whitehead on history, ideas, play, study, and thought

I will not go so far as to say that to construct a history of thought without profound study of the mathematical ideas of successive epochs is like omitting Hamlet from the play which is named after him. That would be claiming too much. But it is certainly analogous to cutting out the part of Ophelia. This simile is singularly exact. For Ophelia is quite essential to the play, she is very charming . . . and a little mad.

Alfred Whitehead (1861 - 1947)

Source: W.H. Auden and L. Kronenberger The Viking Book of Aphorisms, New York: Viking Press, 1966.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alexander Smith on thought and value

A thought may be very commendable as a thought, but I value it chiefly as a window through which I can obtain insight on the thinker.

Alexander Smith (1830 - 1867)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alexander Pope on nature, thought, and wit

True wit is Nature to advantage dress'd, What oft was thought, but ne'er so well express'd.

Alexander Pope (1688 - 1744)

Source: Essay on Criticism. Part ii. Line 97.

Contributed by: Zaady

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