tears

A Quote by William Shakespeare on innocence and tears

The big round tears Cours'd one another down his innocent nose, In piteous chase.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: As You Like It, act 2, scene 1

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on art, bliss, soul, and tears

Thou art a soul in bliss; but I am bound Upon a wheel of fire; that mine own tears Do scald like molten lead.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: King Lear, Act: IV Scene: vii

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on grief, lies, love, lovers, madness, and tears

ROMEO Why, such is love's transgression. Griefs of mine own lie heavy in my breast, Which thou wilt propagate, to have it prest With more of thine: this love that thou hast shown Doth add more grief to too much of mine own. Love is a smoke raised with the fume of sighs; Being purged, a fire sparkling in lovers' eyes; Being vex'd a sea nourish'd with lovers' tears: What is it else? a madness most discreet, A choking gall and a preserving sweet.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: ROMEO AND JULIET, Act 1, Scene 1

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on action, angels, day, deed, doubt, envy, friendship, good, heart, honor, ingratitude, judgment, kindness, love, men, nobility, overcoming, perception, pity, power, preparation, privacy, reason, soul, speech, tears, time,

If you have tears, prepare to shed them now. You all do know this mantle: I remember The first time ever Caesar put it on; 'Twas on a summer's evening, in his tent, That day he overcame the Nervii: Look, in this place ran Cassius' dagger through: See what a rent the envious Casca made: Through this the well-beloved Brutus stabb'd; And as he pluck'd his cursed steel away, Mark how the blood of Caesar follow'd it, As rushing out of doors, to be resolved If Brutus so unkindly knock'd, or no; For Brutus, as you know, was Caesar's angel: Judge, O you gods, how dearly Caesar loved him! This was the most unkindest cut of all; For when the noble Caesar saw him stab, Ingratitude, more strong than traitors' arms, Quite vanquish'd him: then burst his mighty heart; And, in his mantle muffling up his face, Even at the base of Pompey's Statua, Which all the while ran blood, great Cæsar fell, O! what a fall was there, my countrymen; Then I, and you, and all of us fell down, Whilst bloody treason flourish'd over us. O! now you weep, and I perceive you feel The dint of pity; these are gracious drops. Kind souls, what, weep you when you but behold Our Caesar's vesture wounded? Look you here, Here is himself, marr'd, as you see, with traitors. . . . . Good friends, sweet friends, let me not stir you up To such a sudden flood of mutiny. They that have done this deed are honourable: What private griefs they have, alas! I know not, That made them do it; they are wise and honourable, And will no doubts with reason answer you. I come not, friends, to steal away your hearts: I am no orator, as Brutus is; But, as you know me all, a plain blunt man, That love my friend. . . . . For I have neither wit, nor words, nor worth, Action , nor utterance, nor power of speech, To stir men's blood; I only speak right on; I tell you that which you yourselves do know.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Julius Cæsar, Mark Antony in Act 3, scene 2.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William M. Peck on acceptance, joy, laughter, life, people, sorrow, tears, time, tolerance, and truth

The acceptance of the truth that joy and sorrow, laughter and tears are not confined to any particular time, place or people, but are universally distributed, should make us more tolerant of and more interested in the lives of others.

William M. Peck

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Ernest Henley on chance, circumstances, fate, soul, and tears

Out of the night that covers me, Black as the pit from pole to pole, I thank whatever gods may be For my unconquerable soul. In the fell clutch of circumstance I have not winced nor cried aloud. Under the bludgeonings of chance My head is bloody, but unbowed. Beyond this place of wrath and tears Looms but the Horror of the shade, And yet the menace of the years Finds and shall find me unafraid. It matters not how strait the gate, How charged with punishments the scroll, I am the master of my fate: I am the captain of my soul.

William Ernest Henley (1849 - 1903)

Source: Echoes. Invictus

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Butler Yeats on foolishness, god, life, tears, and world

She bid me take life easy, as the grass grows on the weirs; But I was young and foolish, and now am full of tears. The years like great black oxen tread the world And God the herdsman goads them on behind And I am broken by their passing feet.

William Butler Yeats (1865 - 1939)

Source: The Countess Cathleen, 1892, last lines

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Butler Yeats on anger, nobility, and tears

All the wild witches, those most noble ladies, For all their broomsticks and their tears, Their angry tears, are gone.

William Butler Yeats (1865 - 1939)

Source: The Wild Swans at Coole 1919. Lines Written in Dejection 1. 4

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Blake on imagination, joy, nature, ridicule, and tears

The tree which moves some to tears of joy is in the eyes of others only a green thing that stands in the way. Some see Nature all ridicule and deformity, and some scarce see Nature at all. But to the eyes of the man of imagination, Nature is Imagination itself.

William Blake (1757 - 1827)

Source: 1799, The Letters

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Allingham on bankers and tears

Four ducks on a pond, A grass-bank beyond, A blue sky of spring, White clouds on the wing: What a little thing To remember for years- To remember with tears.

William Allingham (1828 - 1889)

Source: A Memory

Contributed by: Zaady

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