sufi

A Quote by unknown on calling, longing, sufi, self, and beloved

I am calling to you from afar;
Calling to you since the very beginning of days.
Calling to you across millennia,
For aeons of time-
Calling-calling. Since always.
It is part of your being, my voice,
But it comes to you faintly and you only hear it sometimes;
"I don't know," you may say.
But somewhere you know.
"I can't hear," you say, "what is it and where?"
But somewhere you hear, and deep down you know.
For I am that in you which has been always;
I am that in you which will never end.
Even if you say, "Who is calling?"
Even if you think, "Who is that?"
Where will you run? Just tell me.
Can you run away from yourself?

For I am the Only One for you;
There is no other,
Your Promise, your Reward am I alone-
Your Punishment, your longing
And your Goal.
-Anonymous

unknown

Contributed by: nobody

A Quote by Mevlana Jelalu'ddin Rumi on friendship, sufi, and present

My friend, the sufi is the friend of the present moment. To say tomorrow is not our way.

Mevlana Rumi (1207 - 1273)

Source: Rumi Daylight: A Daybook of Spiritual Guidance

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Dr. Deepak Chopra on creativity, inspiration, knowledge, learning, poets, reflection, silence, stability, sufi, and teachers

Silence is the great teacher, and to learn its lessons you must pay attention to it. There is no substitute for the creative inspiration, knowledge, and stability that come from knowing how to contact your core of inner silence. The great Sufi poet Rumi wrote, ''Only let the moving waters calm down, and the sun and moon will be reflected on the surface of your being.

Deepak Chopra

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abu Bakr Muhammad Ibn al-`Arabi on awareness, fame, god, guidance, respect, and sufi

All those among the Sufis who had no visible murshid (guide), that is, an earthly man like themselves and a contemporary, called themselves Uwaysis. One of the most famous was abu'l-Hasan Kharraqani (d. 425/1034), an Iranian Sufi, who left us the following saying: I am amazed at those disciples who declare that they require this or that master. You are perfectly well aware that I have never been taught by any man. God was my guide, though I have the greatest respect for all the masters.

Ibn al-'Arabi (1165 - 1240)

Source: Corbin, Henry. Creative Imagination in the Sufism of Ibn `Arabi, 1969. pp. 32-33

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abu Bakr Muhammad Ibn al-`Arabi on attitude, concern, doctors, giving, ignorance, islam, laws, mortality, secrets, spirituality, stupidity, and sufi

When Sufism was at loggerheads with the legalitarian Islam embodied by the doctors of the Law, known as the fuqaha', according to Henry Corbin: . . . Ibn 'Arabi made no secret of his disgust at their stupidity, ignorance, and depravity, and such an attitude was not calculated to win their favor. The tension rose, giving rise to denunciations and arrests; our shaikh was in mortal peril. At this critical moment the irreducible antagonism between the spiritual Islam of Sufism and legalitarian Islam became patent. Saved by the intervention of a friendly shaikh, Ibn 'Arabi had but one concern, to flee far from Cairo and its hateful, bigoted canonists. Where was he to seek refuge? He returned to Meca (1207).

Ibn al-'Arabi (1165 - 1240)

Source: Corbin, Henry. Creative Imagination in the Sufism of Ibn `Arabi, 1969.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by 'Abd al-Kader on affliction, certainty, desires, direction, evil, faith, fear, generosity, god, grace, hell, hope, order, paradise, people, prophets, purity, sacred, sharing, sufi, virtue, work, and world

. . . Whoever adores Allah through the fears of the fires of hell or in order to gain Paradise, whoever invokes Him in order that his share in the goods of the world be enlarged, or so that people should turn their faces toward him in order that he be glorified, or to avoid the evil which an oppressor afflicts upon him; or further, if he has heard a hadith* of the Prophet according to which he who accomplishes a certain pious work, or recites a certain invocation, will receive from God some recompense - whoever does this, his adoration is tainted, and it will not be acceptable to God except by virtue of His grace and of His generosity. . . . God said, "Whoever hopes to encounter his Lord, let him do pious works and, in the adoration of his Lord, not associate any being with Him." (Koran 18:110) The things which I have mentioned are the "beings" which are associated with God. Now, God is, of all those that are associated in adoration, the One who absolutely transcends all association. That is why He prescribed to all His servants that they adore Him with a perfectly pure faith which implies the desire for no other recompense than His face. . . . *hadith: A saying of the Prophet transmitted outside the Qur'an through a chain of known intermediaries. There are two kinds of hadith: hadith qudsi (sacred sentence), a direct revelation, in which God speaks in the first person by the mouth of the Prophet, and hadith nabawi (prophetic sentence), an indirect revelation in which the Prophet speaks as himself. (Introduction to Sufism, p. 117)

'Abd al-Kader (1807 - 1883)

Source: The Spiritual Writings of 'Abd al-Kader, 1995, Kitab al-Mawaqif, 4, pp. 37-38

Contributed by: Zaady

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