speech

A Quote by Søren Aabye Kierkegaard on freedom, men, speech, and thought

How absurd men are! They never use the liberties they have, they demand those they do not have. They have freedom of thought, they demand freedom of speech.

Soren Kierkegaard (1813 - 1855)

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A Quote by Søren Aabye Kierkegaard on freedom, people, speech, and thought

People hardly ever make use of the freedom they have, for example, freedom of thought; instead they demand freedom of speech as a compensation.

Soren Kierkegaard (1813 - 1855)

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A Quote by Sir Walter Scott on age, justice, speech, thought, truth, and youth

Just at the age 'twixt boy and youth, When thought is speech, and speech is truth.

Sir Walter Scott (1771 - 1832)

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A Quote by Sir Philip Sidney on children, legacy, and speech

The best legacy I can leave my children is free speech, and the example of using it.

Sir Philip Sidney (1554 - 1586)

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A Quote by Lucius Annaeus Seneca on harmony, life, and speech

Let us say what we feel, and feel what we say; let speech harmonize with life.

Seneca (4 BC - 65 AD)

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A Quote by Rush H. Limbaugh III on christmas, communism, day, defense, evil, liberals, rhetoric, and speech

National Defense A strong USA defense brought down the Soviet Union. It was Ronald Reagan - first in a speech at Notre Dame University in May 1981, then his 'Evil Empire' speech of March 1983 - who most eloquently declared communism's imminent demise. Reagan was right. And even Soviet officials attribute Ronald Reagan's rhetoric and foreign policy to bringing down that 'evil empire.' By Christmas Day, 1990, the Soviet Union ceased to exist. Liberals wished it were other things.

Rush Limbaugh (1951 -)

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A Quote by Judge Ronald Buckwalter on citizenship, exercise, government, laws, potential, sacred, and speech

If the Government is going to intrude upon the sacred ground of the First Amendment and tell its citizens that their exercise of protected speech could land them in jail, the law imposing such a penalty must clearly define the prohibited speech not only for the potential offender but also for the potential enforcer.

Ronald Buckwalter

Source: 1996, ACLU, et al., v. Janet Reno, 96-963 and ALA, et al., v. Dept. of Justice, 96-1458

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A Quote by Judge Ronald Buckwalter on agreement, body, citizenship, constitution, crime, deals, democracy, government, heart, play, relationships, speech, and survival

This statute, all parties agree, deals with protected speech, the preservation of which has been extolled by court after court in case after case as the keystone, the bulwark, the very heart of our democracy. What is more, the [Communications Decency Act] attempts to regulate protected speech through criminal sanctions, thus implicating not only the First but also the Fifth Amendment of our Constitution. The concept of due process is every bit as important to our form of government as is free speech. If free speech is at the heart of our democracy, then surely due process is the very lifeblood of our body politic; for without it, democracy could not survive. Distilled to its essence, due process is, of course, nothing more and nothing less than fair play. If our citizens cannot rely on fair play in their relationship with their government, the stature of our government as a shining example of democracy would be greatly diminished.

Ronald Buckwalter

Source: 1996, ACLU, et al., v. Janet Reno, 96-963 and ALA, et al., v. Dept. of Justice, 96-1458

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A Quote by Roland Barthes on language, oppression, power, and speech

Language is legislation, speech is its code. We do not see the power which is in speech because we forget that all speech is a classification, and that all classifications are oppressive.

Roland Barthes (1915 - 1980)

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A Quote by Roger Ebert on controversy, death, doubt, fear, freedom, memory, people, popularity, prudence, speech, and television

[Alan Berg's] memory haunts many people, even those who never heard him on the radio, because his death could be read as a message: Be cautious, be prudent, be bland, never push anybody, never say what you really think, offer yourself as a hostage to the weirdos even before they make the first move. These days, a lot of people are opposed to the newfound popularity of 'trash television,' and no doubt they are right, and the hosts of these shows are shameless controversy-mongers. But at least they are not intimidated. Of what use is freedom of speech to those who fear to offend?

Roger Ebert (1942 -)

Contributed by: Zaady

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