sons

A Quote by George Eliot on action, choice, divinity, god, memory, principles, and sons

The sons of Judah have to choose that God may again choose them. The divine principle of our race is action, choice, resolved memory.

George Eliot (1819 - 1880)

Source: Mordecai, in Daniel Deronda, bk. 6, ch. 42, 1876.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Crabbe on advice, good, and sons

'T was good advice, and meant, my son, Be good.

George Crabbe (1754 - 1832)

Source: Tales. Tale xxi. The Learned Boy.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Gary Franks on achievement, basketball, fatherhood, sons, and work

Nothing worthwhile or long-lasting can be achieved without hard work. Former basketball great Sen. Bill Bradley once said that during his Princeton days, his father would tell him, "Son, when you're not out practicing, someone else is. And when you meet that person, he's going to beat you."

Gary Franks

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Frederic William Farrar on age, beginning, belief, children, christ, christianity, cities, death, dogs, earth, enemies, experience, fighting, friendship, generations, god, gold, history, hunger, kindness, lies, men, motherhood, people, prophet

Never was a narrative more full of horrors, frenzies, unspeakable degradations, and overwhelming miseries than is the history of the siege of Jerusalem. Never was any prophecy more closely, more terribly, more overwhelmingly fulfilled than this of Christ. The men going about in the disguise of women with swords concealed under their gay robes; the rival outrages and infamies of John and Simon; the priests struck by darts from the upper court of the Temple, and falling slain by their own sacrifices; 'the blood of all sorts of dead carcases - priests, strangers, profane - standing in lakes in the holy courts'; the corpses themselves lying in piles and mounds on the very altar slopes; the fires feeding luxuriously on cedar-work overlaid with gold: friend and foe trampled to death on the gleaming mosaics in promiscuous carnage: priests, swollen with hunger, leaping madly into the devouring flames, till at last those flames had done their work, and what had been the Temple of Jerusalem, the beautiful and holy House of God, was a heap of ghastly ruin, where the burning embers were half-slaked in pools of gore. And did not all the righteous blood shed upon the earth since the days of Abel come upon that generation? Did not many of that generation survive to witness and feel the unutterable horrors which Josephus tells? - to see their fellows crucified in jest "some one way, and some another," till "room was wanting for the crosses, and crosses for the carcases?" - to experience the "deep silence" and the kind of deadly night which seized upon the city in the intervals of rage? - to see 600,000 dead bodies carried out of the gates? -- to see friends fighting madly for grass and nettles, and the refuse of the drains? to see the bloody zealots "gaping for want, and stumbling and staggering along like mad dogs?" - to hear the horrid tale of the miserable mother who, in the pangs of famine, had devoured her own child? - to be sold for slaves in such multitudes that at last none would buy them? - to see the streets running with blood, and the "fire of burning houses quenched in the blood of their defenders?" - to have their young sons sold in hundreds, or exposed in the amphitheatres to the sword of the gladiator or the fury of the lion, until at last, "since the people were now slain, the Holy House burnt down, and the city in flames, there was nothing farther left for the enemy to do?" In that awful siege it is believed that there perished 1,100,000 men, besides the 97.000 who were carried captive, and most of whom perished subsequently in the arena or the mine; and it was an awful thing to feel, as some of the survivors and eyewitnesses - and they not Christians - did feel, that the city had deserved its overthrow by producing a generation of men who were the causes of its misfortunes;' and that "neither did any other city ever suffer such miseries, nor did any age ever breed a generation more fruitful in wickedness than this was, since the beginning of the world."

Frederic William Farrar (1831 - 1903)

Source: The Life of Christ, pp. 572-73, quoted by Bruce R. McConkie, The Mortal Messiah, Vol.3, p.433-434.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Frederic William Farrar on admiration, agreement, army, conscience, contentment, darkness, deed, guilt, infidelity, inspiration, jesus, money, murder, pride, sons, soul, suffering, time, traditions, vices, virtue, weakness, women, and world

Why did not this multitude of ignorant pilgrims resist? Why did these greedy chafferers content themselves with dark scowls and muttered maledictions, while they suffered their oxen and sheep to be chased into the streets and themselves ejected, and their money flung rolling on the floor by one who was then young and unknown, and in the garb of despised Galilee? Why, in the same way we might ask, did Saul suffer Samuel to beard him in the very presence of his army? Why did David abjectly obey the orders of Joab? Why did Ahab not dare to arrest Elijah at the door of Naboth's vineyard? Because sin is weakness; because there is in the world nothing so abject as a guilty conscience, nothing so invincible as the sweeping tide of a Godlike indignation against all that is base and wrong. How could these paltry sacrilegious buyers and sellers, conscious of wrongdoing, oppose that scathing rebuke, or face the lightnings of those eyes that were enkindled by an outraged holiness? When Phinehas the priest was zealous for the Lord of Hosts, and drove through the bodies of the prince of Simeon and the Midianitish woman with one glorious thrust of his indignant spear, why did not guilty Israel avenge that splendid murder? Why did not every man of the tribe of Simeon become a Goel to the dauntless assassin? Because Vice cannot stand for one moment before Virtue's uplifted arm. Base and grovelling as they were, these money-mongering Jews felt, in all that remnant of their souls which was not yet eaten away by infidelity and avarice, that the Son of Man was right. Nay, even the Priests and Pharisees, and Scribes and Levites, devoured as they were by pride and formalism, could not condemn an act which might have been performed by a Nehemiah or a Judas Maccabaeus, and which agreed with all that was purest and best in their traditions. But when they had heard of this deed, or witnessed it, and had time to recover from the breathless mixture of admiration, disgust, and astonishment which it inspired, they came to Jesus, and though they did not dare to condemn what He had done, yet half indignantly asked Him for some sign that He had a right to act thus.

Frederic William Farrar (1831 - 1903)

Source: Farrar in The Life of Christ, p.151 & 152, quoted by James E. Talmage, Jesus the Christ, Ch.12, p.169

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by François Fénelon on appearance, belief, christ, christianity, correction, death, diet, earth, eternity, faith, happiness, jesus, judgment, life, practice, sons, soul, suffering, and world

"When the Son of Man cometh, shall He find faith on the earth?" If He should now come, would He find it in us? What fruits of faith have we to show? Do we look upon this life only as a short passage to a better? Do we believe that we must suffer with Jesus Christ before we can reign with Him? Do we consider this world as a deceitful appearance, and death as the entrance to true happiness? Do we live by faith? Does it animate us? Do we relish the eternal truths it presents us with? Are we as careful to nourish our souls with those truths as to maintain our bodies with proper diet? Do we accustom ourselves to see all things in the light of faith? Do we correct all our judgments by it? Alas! The greater part of Christians think and act like mere heathens; if we judge (as we justly may) of their faith by their practice, we must conclude they have no faith at all.

Francois Fenelon (1651 - 1715)

Source: Meditation

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Elaine Christensen on daughters, day, god, laughter, learning, love, past, religion, sons, teachers, teaching, and water

Whenever It Rains Fräulein Dr. Sauter, our religion teacher, wore hand-knit underwear. Couldn't buy any--she was as big as Noah's Ark. Whenever it rains, I think of her. She loved that story. Wanted to sail away, 'cupped in God's hands.' She'd clasp hers, rocking them back and forth like a boat in steep waves. We dropped our pencil boxes to peek up her skirt, past wide-spread knees, to view thighs encased in 'knit-one, purl-one'. We'd learned to knit socks that year. It took four needles. She must have needed eight, no, sixteen. While teaching, she sat on two chairs, one for each haunch. One day, a chair broke. Dr. Sauter hit the floor like a hippopotamus heading for water. No way could she get up. With side-gripping laughter, we had to fetch the Herr Direktor to help us hoist her to her feet. We pictured old Noah with all his sons and daughters pushing, pulling some big mammoth aboard the ark. The next day she told us why she loved that story. Noah, she said, ignored the laughter.

Elaine Christensen (1948 -)

Source: I have learned five things, 1995 winner, Nat’l Fed’n StatePoetry Societies’ manuscript comp

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Elaine Christensen on endings, hope, peace, sons, sorrow, time, and unhappiness

Sorrow Is A Box Of Flowers What it's all about is sorrow I've become convinced of that sorrow fences each field sorrow clings to stone walls sorrow hedges the road on both sides when her son died sorrow coated her spoon it curled in her bed it hung in her closet like a coat she put on and wore sometimes proudly sometimes bent over I watched her put up the fence the stone walls we've all done it the hedge on either side of the road cowering behind it wishing for a different ending: sorrow is a box of flowers being delivered over and over your name on the card each time the bell rings you go to the door take the box in your arms hoping this time praying this time there'll be a different name but it's always yours in unhappy endings there is finally peace I've become convinced of that sorrow is the schoolmaster the sober drink the great equalizer everyone has to swallow it there's no getting down from the table

Elaine Christensen (1948 -)

Source: I have learned five things, 1995 winner, Nat’l Fed’n StatePoetry Societies’ manuscript comp

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Elaine Christensen on garden, gold, happiness, laws, love, motherhood, mountains, neighbors, passion, songs, sons, world, and worship

Last Request Maybe it's because the days are growing shorter, and each one starts and ends in cold, maybe that's why the sun on my back this afternoon is a loving arm--not a lover's, but a son's, the one who seldom comes anymore for love. Maybe it's because the mountain is now etched in white and the foothills, unafraid, blaze copper and gold and the sunflowers beyond my fence eye me, unblinking in their untamed gardens, and the sky, wholly blue, blesses my days with what even my mother-in-law would have to call happiness. Maybe that's why I think of her when the magpies who have squawked all summer from the roof of our tool shed come now reverently to worship beneath the mountain. Maybe that's why the one rosebush nearest the house continues to push tangerine clusters into the world, like my neighbor in her eighties who asks me to paint her fingernails Passionate Plum. There is something each autumn that presses against the wall, that commands me to make a last request: one more lark song, one last rose, petals tipped in yellow, a last look at our purple-leafed maple before it spreads its sequined cape across the grass.

Elaine Christensen (1948 -)

Source: I have learned five things, 1995 winner, Nat’l Fed’n StatePoetry Societies’ manuscript comp

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Edward Young on blessings, fatherhood, heaven, and sons

The booby father craves a booby son, And by Heaven's blessing thinks himself undone.

Edward Young (1683 - 1765)

Source: Love of Fame. Satire ii. Line 165.

Contributed by: Zaady

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