Silence

A Quote by Frederic William Farrar on age, beginning, belief, children, christ, christianity, cities, death, dogs, earth, enemies, experience, fighting, friendship, generations, god, gold, history, hunger, kindness, lies, men, motherhood, people, prophet

Never was a narrative more full of horrors, frenzies, unspeakable degradations, and overwhelming miseries than is the history of the siege of Jerusalem. Never was any prophecy more closely, more terribly, more overwhelmingly fulfilled than this of Christ. The men going about in the disguise of women with swords concealed under their gay robes; the rival outrages and infamies of John and Simon; the priests struck by darts from the upper court of the Temple, and falling slain by their own sacrifices; 'the blood of all sorts of dead carcases - priests, strangers, profane - standing in lakes in the holy courts'; the corpses themselves lying in piles and mounds on the very altar slopes; the fires feeding luxuriously on cedar-work overlaid with gold: friend and foe trampled to death on the gleaming mosaics in promiscuous carnage: priests, swollen with hunger, leaping madly into the devouring flames, till at last those flames had done their work, and what had been the Temple of Jerusalem, the beautiful and holy House of God, was a heap of ghastly ruin, where the burning embers were half-slaked in pools of gore. And did not all the righteous blood shed upon the earth since the days of Abel come upon that generation? Did not many of that generation survive to witness and feel the unutterable horrors which Josephus tells? - to see their fellows crucified in jest "some one way, and some another," till "room was wanting for the crosses, and crosses for the carcases?" - to experience the "deep silence" and the kind of deadly night which seized upon the city in the intervals of rage? - to see 600,000 dead bodies carried out of the gates? -- to see friends fighting madly for grass and nettles, and the refuse of the drains? to see the bloody zealots "gaping for want, and stumbling and staggering along like mad dogs?" - to hear the horrid tale of the miserable mother who, in the pangs of famine, had devoured her own child? - to be sold for slaves in such multitudes that at last none would buy them? - to see the streets running with blood, and the "fire of burning houses quenched in the blood of their defenders?" - to have their young sons sold in hundreds, or exposed in the amphitheatres to the sword of the gladiator or the fury of the lion, until at last, "since the people were now slain, the Holy House burnt down, and the city in flames, there was nothing farther left for the enemy to do?" In that awful siege it is believed that there perished 1,100,000 men, besides the 97.000 who were carried captive, and most of whom perished subsequently in the arena or the mine; and it was an awful thing to feel, as some of the survivors and eyewitnesses - and they not Christians - did feel, that the city had deserved its overthrow by producing a generation of men who were the causes of its misfortunes;' and that "neither did any other city ever suffer such miseries, nor did any age ever breed a generation more fruitful in wickedness than this was, since the beginning of the world."

Frederic William Farrar (1831 - 1903)

Source: The Life of Christ, pp. 572-73, quoted by Bruce R. McConkie, The Mortal Messiah, Vol.3, p.433-434.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Francis Bacon on silence and virtue

Silence is the virtue of fools.

Francis Bacon (1561 - 1626)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Felix Salten on anticipation, anxiety, curiosity, effort, giving, happiness, love, mind, motherhood, questions, satisfaction, silence, suspicion, time, and understanding

He loved to ask his mother questions. It was the pleasantest thing for him to ask a question and then to hear what answer his mother would give. Bambi was never surprised that question after question should come into his mind continually and without effort. He found it perfectly natural, and it delighted him very much. It was very delightful too, to wait expectantly till the answer came. If it turned out the way he wanted, he was satisfied. Sometimes, of course, he did not understand, but that was pleasant also because he was kept busy picturing what he had not understood, in his own way. Sometimes he felt very sure that his mother was not giving him a complete answer, was intentionally not telling him all she knew. And, at first, that was very pleasant, too. For then there would remain in him such a lively curiosity, such suspicion, mysteriously and joyously flashing through him, such anticipation, that he would become anxious and happy at the same time, and grow silent.

Felix Salten

Source: (Bambi 20- 21)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ernest R.. on beauty, christmas, communication, experience, family, guests, heart, home, language, mankind, music, silence, songs, surprises, thinking, and time

Music, the universal language of mankind, is also a form of beauty at its best. As language differs among peoples, so does the language of music differ with time, place, background and experience; but if it is true music, it strikes a responsive chord. In a Japanese home at Christmas-time, I was the only person in the group who spoke English. Yet ways of communication were found. Thinking of home, I hummed softly to myself, "Silent Night." To my surprise, the French guest, the German guest and the Japanese family joined in singing the universally inspiring Christmas song, each in his own language, yet in the same language, the language of the heart.

Ernest R..

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Emily Brontë on effort, silence, and work

If I could I would always work in silence and obscurity, and let my efforts be known by their results.

Emily Brontë

Source: An Uncommon Scold, by Donald E. Westlake, 1989.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Elizabeth Barrett Browning on silence

in

By thunders of white silence.

Elizabeth Browning (1806 - 1861)

Source: Hiram Powers's Greek Slave.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Elinor Morton Hoyt Wylie on silence

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We shall walk in velvet shoes: Wherever we go Silence will fall like dews On white silence below.

Elinor Morton Hoyt Wylie (1885 - 1928)

Source: Velvet Shoes, 1921, st. 4

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Edward Young on age, judgment, and silence

Age should fly concourse, cover in retreat defects of judgment, and the will subdue; walk thoughtful on the silent, solemn shore of that vast ocean it must sail so soon.

Edward Young (1683 - 1765)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Edward Lear on darkness and silence

When awful darkness and silence reign Over the great Gromboolian plain, Through the long, long wintry nights;

Edward Lear (1812 - 1888)

Source: The Dong with the luminous Nose.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Edward Fitzgerald on silence

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After a momentary silence spake Some Vessel of a more ungainly Make; "They sneer at me for leaning all awry: What! did the Hand of the Potter shake?"

Edward Fitzgerald (1809 - 1883)

Source: The Rubáiyát of Omar Khayyám, Persian writer & astronomer (c.1050–c.1123)

Contributed by: Zaady

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