selfishness

A Quote by Ralph Waldo Emerson on selfishness, trade, and world

The greatest meliorator of the world is selfish, huckstering Trade.

Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803 - 1882)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by R. H. Cabell on adventure, business, day, deed, hypocrisy, mistakes, reform, reward, selfishness, sentimentality, thinking, and words

I like business because it is competitive, because it rewards deeds rather than words. I like business because it compels earnestness and does not permit me to neglect today's task while thinking about tomorrow. I like business because it undertakes to please, not reform; because it is honestly selfish, thereby avoiding hypocrisy and sentimentality. I like business because it promptly penalizes mistakes, shiftlessness and inefficiency, while rewarding well those who give it the best they have in them. Lastly, I like business because each day is a fresh adventure.

R. H. Cabell

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Price Pritchett, Ph.D. on conflict, conscience, ethics, heart, interest, listening, mind, and selfishness

Pay attention to the voice within. . . . Sometimes the voice of your conscience gets drowned out by crowd noise or by the pep rally of temptations. And your mind may put some selfish spin on the ball, rationalizing that it's okay to veer away from the ethical route. When we run into conflicts between ethical "shoulds" and our selfish "wants," we all argure out ways to con our conscience. But take pains to listen, because it has your best interests at heart.

Price Pritchett

Source: The Ethics of Excellence

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Patrick B. Comer, Jr. on adventure, belief, goals, interest, life, people, and selfishness

Getting ahead in industry is an adventure-and there aren't many people today who like adventure. . . . The supervisor who gets ahead must have a basic, materialistic selfish interest in a better life . . . and must believe he'll reach his goal if he tries hard enough. The door is still open to initiative.

Patrick B. Comer

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Oscar Fingall O'Flahertie Wills Wilde on acceptance, life, people, selfishness, variety, and wishes

Selfishness is not living as one wishes to live; it is asking others to live as one wishes to live. And unselfishness is letting other people's lives alone, not interfering with them. Selfishness always aims at uniformity of type. Unselfishness recognizes infinite variety of type as a delightful thing, accepts it, acquiesces in it, enjoys it.

Oscar Wilde (1854 - 1900)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Neal A. Maxwell on selfishness and path

In contrast to the path of selfishness, there is no room for road rage on the straight and narrow way.

Neal Maxwell (1926 -)

Source: General Conference, April 1999, © by Intellectual Reserve, Inc. Used by permission.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Neal A. Maxwell on cities, emotion, god, impulses, proverbs, resentment, and selfishness

Submissiveness to God enables us to govern ourselves. . . . Lacking this capacity we vulnerable, like "a city which is broken down, and without walls" (Proverbs 25:28). We are vulnerable if we can be taken by a wave of emotion, invaded by an invidious impulse, roughed up by resentment, or engulfed by a surge of selfishness.

Neal Maxwell (1926 -)

Source: Not My Will, But Thine, page 95, © by Intellectual Reserve, Inc. Used by permission.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Cal Thomas on acceptance, america, audiences, babies, blindness, boldness, children, concern, country, criticism, death, decisions, dignity, generosity, good, heart, hunger, inclusion, life, love, motherhood, murder, nations, nobility, peace,

Mother Teresa Has Anti-Abortion Answer At a National Prayer Breakfast in Washington Feb. 3, Mother Teresa of Calcutta delivered the most startling and bold proclamation of truth to power I have heard in my more than 30 professional years in Washington. Before an audience of 3,000 - that included the president and his wife, the vice president and his wife and congressional leaders, among others - the 83-year old nun, who is physically frail but spiritually and rhetorically powerful, delivered an address that cut to the heart of the social ills afflicting America. She said that America, once known for generosity to the world, has become selfish. And she said that the greatest proof of that selfishness is abortion. Tying abortion to growing violence and murder in the streets, she said, "If we accept that a mother can kill even her own child, how can we tell other people not to kill each other? . . . Any country that accepts abortion is not teaching its people to love, but to use any violence to get what they want." At that line, most of those in attendance erupted in a standing ovation, something that rarely occurs at these sedate events. At that moment, President Clinton quickly reached for his water glass, and Mrs. Clinton and Vice President and Mrs. Gore stared without expression at Mother Teresa. They did not applaud. It was clearly an uncomfortable moment on the dais. She then delivered the knockout punch: "Many people are very, very concerned with children in India, with the children of Africa where quite a few die of hunger, and so on. Many people are also concerned about all the violence in this great country of the United States. "These concerns are very good. But often these same people are not concerned with the millions who are being killed by the deliberate decision of their own mothers. And this is what is the greatest destroyer of peace today - abortion, which brings people to such blindness." What? Abortion destroys peace and causes blindness toward the sick, the hungry and the naked? Abortion leads to wars between nations? Of course it does, if life is regarded so lightly and its disposal becomes so trivial, so clinical and so easy. Why should people or nations regard human life as noble or dignified if abortion flourishes? Why agonize about indiscriminate death in Bosnia when babies are being killed far more efficiently and out of the sight of television cameras? Mother Teresa delivered her address without rhetorical flourishes. She never raised her voice or pounded the lectern. Her power was in her words and the selfless life she has led. Even President Clinton, in his remarks that followed, acknowledged she was beyond criticism because of the life she has lived in service to others. At the end, she pleaded for pregnant women who don't want their children to give them to her: "I am willing to accept any child who would be aborted and to give that child to a married couple who will love the child and be loved by the child." She said she has placed over 3,000 children in adoptive homes from her Calcutta headquarters alone. She has answered the question, "Who will care for all of these babies if abortion is again outlawed?" Now the question is whether a woman contemplating abortion wishes to be selfish or selfless, to take life or to give life.

Cal Thomas

Source: Los Angeles Times Syndicate, Salt Lake Tribune, Feb. 14, 1994

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Lao Tzu on desires, selfishness, and simplicity

Manifest plainness, Embrace simplicity, Reduce selfishness, Have few desires.

Lao Tzu (c.604 - 531 B.C.)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Lao Tzu on acceptance, cleverness, confusion, divinity, goals, guidance, leadership, life, energy, sacrifice, selfishness, spirituality, students, truth, understanding, virtue, world, elightenment, and taoism

The world is full of half-enlightened masters. Overly clever, too "sensitive" to live in the real world, they surround themselves with selfish pleasures and bestow their grandiose teachings upon the unwary. Prematurely publicizing themselves, intent upon reaching some spiritual climax, they constantly sacrifice the truth and deviate from the Tao. What they really offer the world is their own confusion. The true master understands that enlightenment is not the end, but the means. Realizing that virtue is her goal, she accepts the long and often arduous cultivation that is necessary to attain it. She doesn't scheme to become a leader, but quietly shoulders whatever responsibilities fall to her. Unattached to her accomplishments, taking credit for nothing at all, she guides the whole world by guiding the individuals who come to her. She shares her divine energy with her students, encouraging them, creating trials to strengthen them, scolding them to awaken them, directing the streams of their lives toward the infinite ocean of the Tao.

Lao Tzu (c.604 - 531 B.C.)

Source: The Hua Hu Ching, (80)

Contributed by: Zaady

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