seasons

A Quote by John Milton on birds, change, charm, earth, heaven, seasons, silence, and time

With thee conversing I forget all time, All seasons, and their change,--all please alike. Sweet is the breath of morn, her rising sweet, With charm of earliest birds; pleasant the sun When first on this delightful land he spreads His orient beams on herb, tree, fruit, and flower, Glist'ring with dew; fragrant the fertile earth After soft showers; and sweet the coming on Of grateful ev'ning mild; then silent night With this her solemn bird and this fair moon, And these the gems of heaven, her starry train: But neither breath of morn when she ascends With charm of earliest birds, nor rising sun On this delightful land, nor herb, fruit, flower, Glist'ring with dew, nor fragrance after showers, Nor grateful ev'ning mild, nor silent night With this her solemn bird, nor walk by moon Or glittering starlight, without thee is sweet.

John Milton (1608 - 1674)

Source: Paradise Lost. Book iv. Line 639.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Milton on books, cheerfulness, darkness, day, divinity, knowledge, men, nature, seasons, and wisdom

Thus with the year Seasons return; but not to me returns Day, or the sweet approach of even or morn, Or sight of vernal bloom or summer's rose, Or flocks, or herds, or human face divine; But cloud instead, and ever-during dark Surrounds me; from the cheerful ways of men Cut off, and for the book of knowledge fair Presented with a universal blank Of Nature's works, to me expung'd and raz'd, And wisdom at one entrance quite shut out.

John Milton (1608 - 1674)

Source: Paradise Lost. Book iii. Line 40.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Milton on death, seasons, and time

Leaves have their time to fall, And flowers to wither at the north-wind's breath, And stars to set; but all, Thou hast all seasons for thine own, O Death!

John Milton (1608 - 1674)

Source: The Hour of Death

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Milton on choice, day, earth, fatherhood, immortality, inspiration, judgment, seasons, sons, time, virtue, and wine

Lawrence, of virtuous father virtuous son, Now that the fields are dank, and ways are mire, Where shall we sometimes meet, and by the fire Help waste a sullen day, what may be won From the hard season gaining? Time will run On smoother, till Favonius re-inspire The frozen earth, and clothe in fresh attire The lily and rose, that neither sowed nor spun. What neat repast shall feast us, light and choice, Of Attic taste, with wine, whence we may rise To hear the lute well touched, or artful voice Warble immortal notes and Tuscan air? He who of those delights can judge, and spare To interpose them oft, is not unwise.

John Milton (1608 - 1674)

Source: Sonnet XX, To Mr Lawrence

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Milton on earth, heaven, nature, and seasons

In those vernal seasons of the year when the air is calm and pleasant, it were an injury and sullenness against nature not to go out and see her riches, and partake in her rejoicing with heaven and earth.

John Milton (1608 - 1674)

Source: Tractate of Education.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Keats on friendship and seasons

Seasons of mists and mellow fruitfulness, Close bosom-friend of the maturing sun; Conspiring with him how to load and bless With fruit the vines that round the thatch-eves run; To bend with apples the moss'd cottage-trees, And fill all fruit with ripeness to the core; To swell the gourd, and plump the hazel shells With a sweet kernel; to set budding more, And still more, later flowers for the bees, Until they think warm days will never cease, For Summer has o'er-brimm'd their clammy cells.

John Keats (1795 - 1821)

Source: To Autumn

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Gay on duty, love, seasons, and youth

Youth's the season made for joys, Love is then our duty.

John Gay (1685 - 1732)

Source: The Beggar's Opera, 1728

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Donne on love, seasons, and time

Love, all alike, no season knows, nor clime, Nor hours, days, months, which are the rags of time.

John Donne (1572 - 1631)

Source: The Sun Rising, st 1

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Donne on day, god, and seasons

Now God comes to thee, not as in the dawning of the day, not as in the bud of the spring, but as the sun at noon to illustrate all shadows, as the sheaves in harvest, to fill all penuries, all occasions invite his mercies, and all times are his seasons.

John Donne (1572 - 1631)

Source: LXXX Sermons, 1640, no. 3, preached on Christmas Day, 1625

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Donne on lovers and seasons

Busy old fool, unruly Sun, Why dost thou thus, Through windows, and through curtains call on us? Must go thy motions lovers' seasons run?

John Donne (1572 - 1631)

Source: The Sun Rising, st 1

Contributed by: Zaady

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