salvation

A Quote by Oliver Wendell Holmes on day, imperfection, knowledge, prophets, and salvation

Every year, if not every day, we have to wager our salvation upon some prophecy based upon imperfect knowledge.

Oliver Wendell Holmes (1809 - 1894)

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A Quote by Oliver Wendell Holmes on salvation and work

Each of us has to work out his salvation in his own way. The most that another can do is to be able to give a helping hand.

Oliver Wendell Holmes (1809 - 1894)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Neal A. Maxwell on corruption, daughters, divinity, god, love, mercy, power, prophets, salvation, sons, spirit, understanding, vices, and worth

. . . Our God is a God of love. He waits with open arms, and the unfolding of His merciful plan of salvation is not only therefore the mark of divine power but also the mark of God's relentless, redeeming love. It is a point well worth pondering because, among other reasons, it will help us to understand better why God, through the prophets, denounces sin and corruption in such scalding terms. He loves all of us, His spirit sons and daughters, but hates our vices. His denunciation of those vices may, if we are not careful, seem to obscure the enormous and perfect love He has for us.

Neal Maxwell (1926 -)

Source: Sermons Not Spoken, p.25-26, © by Intellectual Reserve, Inc. Used by permission.

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A Quote by Miyamoto Musashi on bliss, buddhism, compassion, doctors, innocence, intelligence, laws, learning, life, motherhood, poets, salvation, skill, and teaching

As the innocent infant relies upon the mother for sustenance, so the innocent wanderer, following his native compassion and bliss, relies upon the natural intelligence of life to sustain him. There are various Ways. There is the Way of salvation by the law of Buddha, the Way of Confucius governing the Way of learning, the Way of healing as a doctor, as a poet teaching the Way of Waka, tea, archery, and many arts and skills. Each man practices as he feels inclined.

Miyamoto Musashi (1584 - 1645)

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A Quote by Mark Twain on animals, army, buddhism, catholicism, cats, chaos, christianity, dogs, foolishness, friendship, learning, life, peace, salvation, simplicity, and truth

Man is the Reasoning Animal. Such is the claim. I think it is open to dispute. Indeed, my experiments have proven to me that he is the Unreasoning Animal . . . In truth, man is incurably foolish. Simple things which other animals easily learn, he is incapable of learning. Among my experiments was this. In an hour I taught a cat and a dog to be friends. I put them in a cage. In another hour I taught them to be friends with a rabbit. In the course of two days I was able to add a fox, a goose, a squirrel and some doves. Finally a monkey. They lived together in peace; even affectionately. Next, in another cage I confined an Irish Catholic from Tipperary, and as soon as he seemed tame I added a Scotch Presbyterian from Aberdeen. Next a Turk from Constantinople; a Greek Christian from Crete; an Armenian; a Methodist from the wilds of Arkansas; a Buddhist from China; a Brahman from Benares. Finally, a Salvation Army Colonel from Wapping. Then I stayed away for two whole days. When I came back to note results, the cage of Higher Animals was all right, but in the other there was but a chaos of gory odds and ends of turbans and fezzes and plaids and bones and flesh-not a specimen left alive. These Reasoning Animals had disagreed on a theological detail and carried the matter to a Higher Court.

Mark Twain (1835 - 1910)

Source: Mark Twain, Letters from the Earth, A Fawcett Crest Book, Greenwich, Conn., 1962

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A Quote by Lewis Sperry Chafer on god, salvation, and work

Salvation is the work of God for man; it is not the work of man for God.

Lewis Sperry Chafer (1871 - 1952)

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A Quote by Joseph Story on benevolence, charity, evil, exercise, forgiveness, good, heart, humility, imagination, judgment, learning, melancholy, men, mercy, persecution, pride, proof, purpose, religion, salvation, spirit, spirituality, teaching, vengean

How it is possible to imagine that a religion breathing the spirit of mercy and benevolence, teaching the forgiveness of injuries, the exercise of charity, and the return of good for evil, can be so perverted as to breathe the spirit of slaughter and persecution, of discord and vengeance, for differences of opinion, is a most unaccountable and extraordinary phenomenon. Still more extraordinary, that it should be the doctrine, not of base and wicked men merely seeking to cover up their own misdeeds, but of good men, seeking the way of salvation with uprightness of heart and purpose. It affords a melancholy proof of the infirmity of human judgment, and teaches a lesson of humility from which spiritual pride may learn meekness, and spiritual zeal a moderating wisdom.

Joseph Story (1779 - 1845)

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A Quote by John Smith on age, christianity, compassion, daughters, debt, execution, fatherhood, heart, history, husbands, power, respect, salvation, sister, success, and women

Smith's first report of his salvation at the hands of Pocahontas evidently occurs in a 1616 letter to Queen Anne, written to notify the Crown of his debt to the Indian princess "before she [Pocahontas] arrived at London. . . . "(John Smith, The General History of Virginia) Pocahontas disembarked at Plymouth, England with her husband, John Rolfe, on June 31, 1616, to become the first Indian woman ever to visit Britain. Her subsequent success with the royal court is well-known. "That some ten yeeres agoe being in Virginia, and taken prisoner by the power of Powhatan their chiefe king, I received from this great Salvage exceeding great courtesie, especially from his sonne Nantaquaus . . . and his sister Pocahontas, the kings most deare and wel-beloved daughter, being but a childe of twelve or thirteen yeeres of age, whose compassionate pitifull heart, of my desperate estate, gave me much cause to respect her: I being the first Christian this proud king and his grim attendants ever saw: and thus inthralled in their barbarous power, I cannot say I felt the least occasion of want that was in the power of those my mortall foes to prevent, notwithstanding al their threats. After some six weeks fatting amongst those Salvage Courtiers, at the minute of my execution, she hazarded the beating out of her owne braines to save mine, and not onely that, but so prevailed with her father, that I was safely conducted to James towne..."

John Smith (1580 - 1631)

Source: Letter to Queen Anne, 1616

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A Quote by John Smith on books, daughters, death, devil, friendship, history, imagination, popularity, and salvation

In 1617, a new edition of Smith's True Relation went into print, in which the Pocahontas episode was appended as a sequence of footnotes to the narrative of Smith's captivity under Powhatan. Six years later, the story of Smith's salvation, now quite colorfully detailed, was incorporated into an extensively amended reprint of Symond's Proceedings, published as Book III of Smith's own history of Virginia. Since then, the tale has been firmly fixed in the popular imagination. "At last they brought him [Smith] to Meronocomoco, where was Powhatan their Emperor. ...[H]aving feasted him after their best barbarous manner they could, a long consultation was held, but the conclusion was, two great stones were brought before Powhatan : then as many as could layd hands on him, dragged him to them, and thereon laid his head, and being ready with their clubs, to beate out his braines, Pocahontas the kings dearest daughter, when no intreaty could prevaile, got his head in her armes, and laid her own upon his to save him from death: whereat the Emperour was contented he should live to make him hatchets, and her bells, beads, and copper... Two days after, Powhatan having disguised himselfe in the most fearfullest manner he could, caused Captaine Smith to be brought forth to great house in the woods... [T]hen Powhatan more like a devil then a man with some two hundred more as blacke as himselfe, came unto him and told him now they were friends, and presently he should goe to James towne..."

John Smith (1580 - 1631)

Source: The Generall History of Virginia, 1623

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A Quote by John Locke on christianity, corruption, destruction, fraud, friendship, kindness, men, people, religion, salvation, and suffering

Now, I appeal to the consciences of those that persecute, torment, destroy, and kill other men upon pretence of religion, whether they do it out of friendship and kindness towards them or no? I say, if all this be done merely to make men Christians and procure their salvation, why then do they suffer whoredom, fraud, malice and such-like enormities, which (according to the Apostle) manifestly relish of heathenish corruption, to predominate so much and abound amongst their flocks and people?

John Locke (1632 - 1704)

Source: A Letter Concerning Toleration

Contributed by: Zaady

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