sage

A Quote by Matthew Arnold on age, dawn, and sage

Years hence, perhaps, may dawn an age, More fortunate, alas! than we, Which without hardness will be sage, And gay without frivolity.

Matthew Arnold (1822 - 1888)

Source: The Grande Chartreuse

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Marcus Aurelius Antoninus on life, occupations, sage, and tranquility

Let thine occupations be few, saith the sage, if thou wouldst lead a tranquil life.

Marcus Aurelius (121 - 180)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Lao Tzu on effort, sage, work, and taoism

The Tao of the sage is work without effort.

Lao Tzu (c.604 - 531 B.C.)

Source: The Tao Te Ching, (81)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Lao Tzu on achievement, knowledge, and sage

...The sage works without recognition. He achieves what has to be done without dwelling on it. He does not try to show his knowledge.

Lao Tzu (c.604 - 531 B.C.)

Source: The Tao Te Ching, (77)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Lao Tzu on guidance, humility, lies, oppression, people, rules, and sage

Why is the sea king of a hundred streams? Because it lies below them... If the sage would guide the people, he must serve with humility. If he would lead them, he must follow behind. In this way when the sage rules, the people will not feel oppressed...

Lao Tzu (c.604 - 531 B.C.)

Source: The Tao Te Ching, (66)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Lao Tzu on desires, freedom, ideas, learning, losing, men, and sage

...The sage seeks freedom from desire. He does not collect precious things. He learns not to hold on to ideas. He brings men back to what they have lost.

Lao Tzu (c.604 - 531 B.C.)

Source: The Tao Te Ching, (64)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Lao Tzu on day and sage

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...The sage, traveling all day, Does not lose sight of his baggage. Though there are beautiful things to be seen, He remains unattached and calm.

Lao Tzu (c.604 - 531 B.C.)

Source: The Tao Te Ching, (26)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Milton on audiences and sage

With grave Aspect he rose, and in his rising seem'd A pillar of state; deep on his front engraven Deliberation sat, and public care; And princely counsel in his face yet shone, Majestic though in ruin: sage he stood, With Atlantean shoulders, fit to bear The weight of mightiest monarchies; his look Drew audience and attention still as night Or summer's noontide air.

John Milton (1608 - 1674)

Source: Paradise Lost. Book ii. Line 300.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Milton on boldness, gold, learning, peace, power, religion, sage, sons, spirituality, and war

Vane, young in years, but in sage counsel old, Than whom a better senator ne'er held The helm of Rome, when gowns, not arms, repelled The fierce Epirot and the African bold, Whether to settle peace, or to unfold The drift of hollow states hard to be spelled, Then to advise how war may, best upheld, Move by her two main nerves, iron and gold, In all her equipage; besides to know Both spiritual power and civil, what each means, What severs each, thou hast learned, which few have done: The bounds of either sword to thee we owe: Therefore on thy firm hand Religion leans In peace, and reckons thee her eldest son.

John Milton (1608 - 1674)

Source: Sonnet XVII, To Sir Henry Vane the Younger

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by James Beattie on sage and thought

He thought as a sage, though he felt as a man.

James Beattie (1735 - 1803)

Source: The Hermit.

Contributed by: Zaady

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