rules

A Quote by Samuel Butler on rules

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For all a rhetorician's rules Teach nothing but to name his tools.

Samuel Butler (1612 - 1680)

Source: Hudibras. Part i. Canto i. Line 89.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Samuel Butler on individuality, life, and rules

There are two great rules in life, the one general and the other particular. The first is that every one can in the end get what he wants if he only tries. This is the general rule. The particular rule is that every individual is more or less of an exception to the general rule.

Samuel Butler (1612 - 1680)

Source: Samuel Butler’s Notebooks, 1951

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Samuel Butler on composers, feeling, guidance, instinct, life, music, and rules

Life is like music, it must be composed by ear, feeling and instinct, not by rule. Nevertheless one had better know the rules, for they sometimes guide in doubtful cases, though not often.

Samuel Butler (1612 - 1680)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Rush H. Limbaugh III on country, nations, people, problems, rules, society, solution, survival, and traditions

The solution to the nation's problems, depends on the true American achievers. It's people like you, playing by the rules and celebrating and continuing to remind people of the traditions and institutions that made this country great, who can re-create a society that is great once more. It's only by doing the right thing that this country is going to fix itself and survive.

Rush Limbaugh (1951 -)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Rupert Brooke on passion, rules, and slavery

The worst of slaves is he whom passion rules.

Rupert Brooke (1887 - 1915)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Rudolph Carnap on certainty, change, conflict, experience, kindness, language, logic, mathematics, physics, radicals, revolution, rules, science, truth, and value

I should make a distinction between two kinds of readjustment in the case of a conflict with experience, namely, between a change in the language, and a mere change in or addition of, a truth-value ascribed to an indeterminate statement (i.e. a statement whose truth value is not fixed by the rules of language, say by the postulates of logic, mathematics and physics). A change of the first kind constitutes a radical alteration, sometimes a revolution, and it occurs only at certain historically decisive points in the development of science. On the other hand, changes of the second kind occur every minute. A change of the first kind constitutes, strictly speaking, a transition from a language Ln into a new language Ln+1.

Rudolph Carnap

Source: "Replies and Systematic Expositions," Schlipp, The Philosophy of Rudolf Carnap [Carnap63], p921

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Roger L. Welsch on agreement, behavior, culture, negotiation, perception, respect, restaurants, rules, sex, television, trust, violence, and women

In some cultures, the sight of a woman's nose and mouth are considered irresistibly seductive. In others, the soles of a person's feet are perceived as disgusting beyond comprehension. In mainstream American culture, sex is obscene but violence is television fare for preschoolers. What is acceptable in swimwear is unacceptable in a restaurant. In an elevator we condone contact that would otherwise be actionable incriminal court. Rules of behavior are not absolute; we negotiate them constantly. . . . Immodesty, indecency, obscenity are cultural factors, mutually agreed upon and negotiable. We are enjoined to "cover our nakedness," but there's considerable disagreement about what our nakedness is. Our noses and mouths? The bottoms of our feet? A lack of trust or mutual respect?

Roger L. Welsch

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Roger H. Lincoln on rules and success

There are two rules for success. . . 1) Never tell everything you know.

Roger H. Lincoln

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A Quote by Robert N.C. Nix on preparation and rules

Be prepared, be sharp, be careful, and use the King's English well. And you can forget all the [other rules] unless you remember one more: Get paid.

Robert N.C. Nix

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by René Descartes on acceptance, beginning, direction, doubt, failure, judgment, knowledge, mind, order, prejudice, problems, resolution, rules, solution, and thought

I thought the following four [rules] would be enough, provided that I made a firm and constant resolution not to fail even once in the observance of them. The first was never to accept anything as true if I had not evident knowledge of its being so; that is, carefully to avoid precipitancy and prejudice, and to embrace in my judgment only what presented itself to my mind so clearly and distinctly that I had no occasion to doubt it. The second, to divide each problem I examined into as many parts as was feasible, and as was requisite for its better solution. The third, to direct my thoughts in an orderly way; beginning with the simplest objects, those most apt to be known, and ascending little by little, in steps as it were, to the knowledge of the most complex; and establishing an order in thought even when the objects had no natural priority one to another. And the last, to make throughout such complete enumerations and such general surveys that I might be sure of leaving nothing out.

René Descartes (1596 - 1650)

Source: Discours de la Méthode. 1637.

Contributed by: Zaady

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