regret

A Quote by William H. Sheldon on happiness and regret

Happiness is essentially a state of going somewhere, wholeheartedly, one-directionally, without regret or reservation.

William H. Sheldon

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Faulkner on regret

in

Tomorrow night is nothing but one long sleepless wrestle with yesterday's omissions and regrets.

William Faulkner (1897 - 1962)

Source: Intruder in the Dust

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by unknown on life and regret

Never regret yesterday. Life is in you today, and you make your tomorrow.

unknown

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by unknown on brothers, courage, cowardice, earth, failure, fate, fear, good, progress, regret, sorrow, victory, and worth

The test of a man is the fight that he makes, the grit that he daily shows; the way that he stands on his feet and takes fate's numerous bumps and blows. A coward can smile when there's naught to fear and nothing his progress bars, but it takes a man to stand up and cheer when the other fellow stars. It isn't the victory after all, but the fight that a brother makes. The man who, driven against the wall, still stands erect and takes the blows of fate with his head held high, bleeding and bruised and pale. He's the man who'll win in the by and by, for he isn't afraid to fail. It's the bumps you get and the shocks, you get and the jolts that your courage stands; the hours of sorrow and vain regrets, the prize that escapes your hand that tests your metal and proves your worth. It isn't the blows that you deal, it's the blows you take on this good old earth that show if your stuff is real.

unknown

Source: Albert W. Daw Collection

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Stephen King on crime, regret, and film quote

What do you really want to know? Am I sorry for what I did? There's not a day goes by I don't feel regret. Not because I'm in here, but because you think I should be. I look back on the way I was. A young, stupid kid that committed that terrible crime. I want to talk to him. I want to try to talk some sense to him. Tell him the way things are. But I can't. That kid's long gone, and this old man is all that's left.

Stephen King (1947 -)

Source: Shawshank Redemption, cowritten with Frank Darabont

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by unknown on dreams and regret

I'd rather look forward and dream, then look backwards and regret.

unknown

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by unknown on action, belief, confusion, difficulty, justice, listening, practice, problems, regret, solution, and time

Eight things to do when difficulty hits you. 1. Keep calm, don't panic, don't get dramatic. 2. Don't nurse regrets, (forget what is over the dam). 3. Practice de-confusion (list it on paper). 4. Don't insist on a solution for the whole problem (just go one step at a time). 5. Ask yourself if the problem is right or wrong; (no wrong action works out right) (hold on to the right and you will come out all right in the end.). 6. Pray. 7. Go for a walk and talk with the Lord and then listen and believe. 8. Continue to persevere. You will somehow stay on top and come out all right.

unknown

Source: Albert W. Daw Collection

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Stearns Eliot on birth, bitterness, cities, darkness, dawn, death, doubt, emptiness, horses, information, journeys, justice, lies, men, people, regret, sleep, thought, time, travel, water, weather, wine, and women

Journey of the Magi "A cold coming we had of it, Just the worst time of the year For a journey, and such a long journey: The ways deep and the weather sharp, The very dead of winter." And the camels galled, sore-footed, refractory, Lying down in the melting snow. There were times we regretted The summer palaces on slopes, the terraces, And the silken girls bringing sherbet. Then the camel men cursing and grumbling And running away, and wanting their liquor and women, And the night-fires going out, and the lack of shelters, And the cities hostile and the towns unfriendly And the villages dirty and charging high prices: A hard time we had of it. At the end we preferred to travel all night, Sleeping in snatches, With the voices singing in our ears, saying That this was all folly. Then at dawn we came down to a temperate valley, Wet, below the snow line, smelling of vegetation, With a running stream and a water-mill beating the darkness, And three trees on the low sky. And an old white horse galloped away in the meadow. Then we came to a tavern with vine-leaves over the lintel, Six hands at an open door dicing for pieces of silver, And feet kicking the empty wine-skins. But there was no information, and so we continued And arrived at evening, not a moment too soon Finding the place; it was (you may say) satisfactory. All this was a long time ago, I remember, And I would do it again, but set down This set down This: were we led all that way for Birth or Death? There was a Birth, certainly, We had evidence and no doubt. I had seen birth and death, But had thought they were different; this Birth was Hard and bitter agony for us, like Death, our death. We returned to our places, these Kingdoms, But no longer at ease here, in the old dispensation, With an alien people clutching their gods. I should be glad of another death.

T.S. Eliot (1888 - 1965)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Whately on circumstances, imagination, peace, regret, retirement, romance, style, and water

Water . . . which, though not absolutely necessary to a beautiful composition, yet occurs so often, and is so capital a feature, that is is always regretted when wanting; and no large place can be supposed, a little spot can hardly be imagined in which it may not be agreeable; it accommodates itself to every situation; is the most interesting object in a landscape, and the happiest circumstance in a retired recess; captivates the eye at a distance; invites approach, and is delightful when near; it refreshes an open exposure; it animates a shade; cheers the dreariness of a waste, and enriches the most crowded view; in form, in style, and in extent, may be made equal to the greatest compositions, or adapted to the least; it may spread in a calm expanse to sooth the tranquillity of a peaceful scene; or hurrying along a devious course, add splendor to a gay, and extravagance to a romantic situation.

Thomas Whately

Source: Observations on Modern Gardening, 1770

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Tallulah Bankhead on life, mistakes, past, and regret

The only thing I regret about my past is the length of it. If I had to live my life again, I'd make the same mistakes, only sooner.

Tallulah Bankhead (1903 - 1968)

Contributed by: Zaady

Syndicate content