possessions

A Quote by Kenneth Smith on philosophy, possessions, modernity, egologism, privatism, isolationism, ego, sharing, generosity, culture, politics, democracy, and aristeia

From moderns’ manic phobias about socialism and communism it is patent that this is a civilization of paralytic egologism, of psychotic proprietarism:  the American aborigines who were genocidally extinguished by waves of whites saw most sharply the truth about modernity’s manias—“The love of possessions is a disease with them.”  In moderns’ culture of abstracted ego and intensified but destitute “consciousness,” the aristic ethos not just of sharing and generosity but also of open communication, forthrightness, honesty, and candor has demonstrably perished.  There are utterly not enough aristic personalities surviving to make a commonality of culture feasible any longer:  “politics” has become a dark euphemism for organized deception, hi-tech manipulation, and Olympian Machiavellian intrigues, and “democracy” in that world-order is so moribund it can be little more than a pious verbalism, a rhetorical fraud.

Kenneth Smith

Source: http://www.tcj.com/?p=605

Contributed by: Dave

A Quote by Eckhart Tolle on ego, identification, possessions, recognition, knowledge, education, and self

The most common ego identifications have to do with possessions, the work you do, social status and recognition, knowledge and education, physical appearance, special abilities, relationships, person and family history, belief systems, and often also political, nationalistic, racial, religious, and other collective identifications.

None of these is you.

Eckhart Tolle

Source: The Power of Now : A Guide to Spiritual Enlightenment, Pages: 37

Contributed by: Siona

A Quote by Herodotus on friend, precious, possessions, and herodotus

Of all possessions a friend is the most precious

Herodotus (485 - 425 BC)

Source: between friends

Contributed by: Kim

A Quote by St. Teresa of Avila on demons, fear, frightened, attachment, possessions, negative, weapons, and enemies

  "Demons frighten us because we set ourselves up to be frightened. We are overly attached to our reputations and possessions. When we love and desire what we should be rejecting, we are in conflict with our true selves.That's when the negative energies catch us and use our weapons against us. Instead of taking up what we have to defend ourselves, we put our swords in the hands of our enemies and make them attack us."

Teresa

Contributed by: JulieJordanScott

A Quote by Eckhart Tolle on ego, identification, possessions, work, social status, recognition, knowledge, education, appearance, ability, relationships, history, beliefs, and you

The most common ego identifications have to do with possessions, the work you do, social status and recognition, knowledge and education, physical appearance, special abilities, relationships, personal and family history, belief systems, and often political, nationalistic, racial, religious, and other collective identifications. None of these is you.

Eckhart Tolle

Source: The Power of Now : A Guide to Spiritual Enlightenment

Contributed by: Katy

A Quote by Ven Payutto on economics, wealth, materialism, marxist, buddhism, possessions, and livelihood

For the individual, the objective of livelihood is to acquire the four necessities or requisites of human existence: food, clothing, shelter, and medicine. Again, the acquisition of these four requisites, be it in sufficient amount or in surplus, is not the ultimate objective. The four requisites are merely a foundation upon which efforts to realize higher objectives can be based.

Some people are content with few possessions and need only a minimum to devote their energies to mental and spiritual development. Others cannot live happily on such a small amount; they are more dependent on material goods. As long as their livelihood does not exploit others, however, Buddhism does not condemn their wealth. Moreover, people who are charitably inclined can use their wealth in ways that are beneficial for society as a whole.

In opposition to contemporary urban values, Buddhism does not measure a person's or nation's worth by material wealth. Nor does it go to the opposite extreme, as do Marxist thinkers, and condemn the accumulation of wealth as an evil in and of itself. Instead, Buddhism judges the ethical value of wealth by the ways in which it is obtained, and the uses to which it is put.

Ven Payutto

Source: Buddhist Economics: A Middle Way for the Market Place

Contributed by: Siona

A Quote by "Mahatma" Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi on service, joy, pleasure, and possessions

Service which is rendered without joy helps neither the servant nor the served. But all other pleasures and possessions pale into nothingness before service which is rendered in a spirit of joy.

Gandhi (1869 - 1948)

Source: The Essential Gandhi: An Anthology of His Writings on His Life, Work, and Ideas (Vintage Spiritual Classics), Pages: 42

Contributed by: jess

A Quote by Zacharia Johnson on argument, constitution, oppression, people, persecution, possessions, religion, and weapons

Zacharia Johnson argued that the new Constitution could never result in religious persecution or other oppression because: The people are not to be disarmed of their weapons. They are left in full possession of them.

Zacharia Johnson

Source: 1788, During Virginia’s ratification convention for the U.S. Constitution

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on losing, possessions, value, virtue, and worth

For it so falls out That what we have we prize not to the worth Whiles we enjoy it, but being lack'd and lost, Why, then we rack the value, then we find The virtue that possession would not show us Whiles it was ours.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Much Ado About Nothing

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Lyon Phelps on faith, mind, possessions, religion, and war

My religious faith remains in possession of the field only after prolonged civil war with my naturally skeptical mind.

William Lyon Phelps (1822 - 1900)

Source: Happiness by William Lyon Phelps

Contributed by: Zaady

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