politics

A Quote by Ambrose Gwinett Bierce on politics

ALLIANCE, n. In international politics, the union of two thieves who have their hands so deeply inserted in each other's pockets that they cannot separately plunder a third.

Ambrose Bierce (1842 - 1914)

Source: The Devil's Dictionary by Ambrose Bierce

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ambrose Gwinett Bierce on death, politics, presidency, and proof

ADMINISTRATION, n. An ingenious abstraction in politics, designed to receive the kicks and cuffs due to the premier or president. A man of straw, proof against bad-egging and dead-catting.

Ambrose Bierce (1842 - 1914)

Source: The Devil's Dictionary by Ambrose Bierce

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ambrose Gwinett Bierce on nations and politics

Boundary: n. in political geography, an imaginary line between two nations, separating the imaginary rights of one from the imaginary rights of the other.

Ambrose Bierce (1842 - 1914)

Source: The Devil's Dictionary by Ambrose Bierce

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ambrose Gwinett Bierce on politics and presidency

PRESIDENCY, n. The greased pig in the field game of American politics.

Ambrose Bierce (1842 - 1914)

Source: The Devil's Dictionary by Ambrose Bierce

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ambrose Gwinett Bierce on garden, poets, politics, and reward

PRISON, n. A place of punishments and rewards. The poet assures us that "Stone walls do not a prison make," but a combination of the stone wall, the political parasite and the moral instructor is no garden of sweets.

Ambrose Bierce (1842 - 1914)

Source: The Devil's Dictionary by Ambrose Bierce

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alvin R. Dyer on america, destiny, politics, religion, and spirituality

The true destiny of America is religious, not political: it is spiritual, not physical.

Alvin R. Dyer (1903 - 1977)

Source: Ensign, Nov. 1968, p. 106.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Allen Lacy on democracy, garden, needs, politics, practice, and reason

Democracy is fine in politics. It should stay there, and we need more of it. But its political virture is no reason to practice it in the garden.

Allen Lacy

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alexander Hamilton on character, politics, and tranquility

To model our political system upon speculations of lasting tranquility, is to calculate on the weaker springs of the human character.

Alexander Hamilton (c.1756 - 1804)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alexander Hamilton on character, debate, democracy, direction, experience, fatherhood, good, government, honor, observation, people, politics, preparation, purity, and tyranny

The Founding Fathers were careful to distinguish representative republicanism from direct democracy. Alexander Hamilton, for example, endorsed the former but condemned the latter. . . .the records of the ratification conventions were not verbatim transcriptions. It has been observed, by an honorable gentleman, that a pure democracy, if it were practicable, would be the most perfect government. Experience has proved that no position in politics is more false than this. The ancient democracies, in which the people themselves deliberated, never possessed one feature of good government. Their very character was tyranny; their figure, deformity. When they assembled, the field of debate presented an ungovernable mob, not only incapable of deliberation, but prepared for every enormity.

Alexander Hamilton (c.1756 - 1804)

Source: at the New York convention for constitutional ratification, June 21, 1788

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alexander Hamilton on character, democracy, enemies, fanaticism, hypocrisy, past, politics, popularity, principles, success, and truth

Perhaps myself the first, at some expense of popularity, to unfold the true character of Jefferson, it is too late for me to become his apologist. Nor can I have any disposition to do it. I admit that his politics are tinctured with fanaticism, that he is too much in earnest in his democracy, that he has been a mischievous enemy to the principle measures of our past administration, that he is crafty & persevering in his objects, that he is not scrupulous about the means of success, nor very mindful of truth, and that he is a contemptible hypocrite.

Alexander Hamilton (c.1756 - 1804)

Source: Letter to James A. Bayard, January 16, 1801

Contributed by: Zaady

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