politics

A Quote by Anaïs Nin on religion, politics, dogmas, automatons, and growth

When we blindly adopt a religion, a political system, a literary dogma, we become automatons. We cease to grow.

Anaïs Nin (1903 - 1977)

Contributed by: MsCapriKell

A Quote by Parker Thomas Moon on politics, war, violence, government, and abstraction

When one uses the simple monosyllabic 'France' one thinks of France as a unit, an entity. When. . . we say 'France sent her troops to conquer Tunis'—we impute not only unity but personality to the country. The very words conceal the facts and make international relations a glamorous drama in which personalized nations are the actors, and all too easily we forget the flesh-and- blood men and women who are the true actors.. . if we had no such word as 'France' . . . then we should more accurately describe the Tunis expedition in some such way as this: 'A few of...thirty-eight million persons sent thirty thousand others to conquer Tunis.' This way of putting the fact immediately suggests a question, or rather a series of questions. Who are the 'few'? Why did they send the thirty thousand to Tunis? And why did these obey? Empire-building is done not by 'nations,' but by men. The problem before us is to discover the men, the active, interested minorities in each nation, who are directly interested in imperialism and then to analyze the reasons why the majorities pay the expenses and fight the wars.

Parker Moon

Source: Imperialism and World Politics (New York: Macmillan, 1930), p. 58.

Contributed by: peter

A Quote by Ludwig von Mises on economic progress, development, wealth, capitalism, economy, politics, and coercion

What is called economic progress is the joint effect of the activities of the three progressive groups—or classes—of the savers, the scientist-inventors, and the entrepreneurs, operating in a market economy as far as it is not sabotaged by the endeavors of the nonprogressive majority of the routinists and the public policies supported by them.

Ludwig von Mises

Source: Mises, Ludwig Von (1962). The Ultimate foundation of Economic Science (2nd ed.). Foundation of Economic Education: Irvington-on-Hudson, NY. p. 127

Contributed by: peter

A Quote by Christian Michel on politics, violence, and libertarian

Politics does not exist to eliminate violence but to legalise it. The only people who suggest making violence illegal are libertarians, and that is why libertarian principles are the most advanced in the evolution of humanity.

Christian Michel

Source: http://bastiat.net/en/Bastiat2001/christian.michel.html

Contributed by: peter

A Quote by E. C. Riegel on money, politics, government, control, war, and peace

If the government were obliged to come to the people for money instead of vice-versa, the people would keep government under control and operate their economy satisfactorily with prosperity and peace resulting. The peoples of the nations do not make war. For them peace is the natural and permanent order. Wars are planned and perpetrated by politicians and their diplomats; and the money power of government is the means by which the people are maneuvered into wars.

E. C. Riegel

Source: http://www.mind-trek.com/treatise/ecr-pem/ch2.htm

Contributed by: peter

A Quote by E. C. Riegel on democracy, money, power, politics, government, tyranny, freedom, liberty, sovereign, and political power

Money power cannot be separated from democratic power without miscarriage and ensuing frustration - political and economic. Democracy implies the sovereignty of man; and, since man cannot be sovereign without the money power, there can not be democracy under the political money system.

E. C. Riegel

Source: http://www.mind-trek.com/treatise/ecr-pem/ch2.htm

Contributed by: peter

A Quote by E. C. Riegel on money, politics, money-making, prosperity, wealth, govern, government, banking, and monopoly

Contrary to popular belief, the banker is neither a money creator nor a money lender. He merely profits from the ignorance of businessmen by charging them for authorizing them to create money, a function that is natural to the buyer and which he can exert without cost if he is intelligent enough to form a reciprocal enabling pact with other buyers. The process involves no cost and, therefore, justifies no fee. Since the money is created only by the act of buying, the banker, of course, does not lend it, and since he is not the buyer, he does not create it. Money cannot be loaned or borrowed until it has been created by the act of buying. Therefore it is correct to say that a savings bank makes loans, but a commercial bank makes no loans. It merely permits "borrowers" to create money. thus increasing the money supply. Non-banking corporations, individuals, pawnbrokers, etc., loan money from the existing supply. Therefore interest may be justified in these cases of actual loans, whereas, it cannot be justified where the "borrower" is the actual creator.

E. C. Riegel

Source: http://www.mind-trek.com/treatise/ecr-pem/ch2.htm

Contributed by: peter

A Quote by E. C. Riegel on money, politics, money-making, wealth, govern, government, banking, monopoly, patents, and licensing

There is an analogy between the patent granting power of government and its money granting power. When a citizen invents a device, the government grants him, through the patent office, a monopoly on the sale of it. When a citizen produces anything, he is at liberty to use it; but, if he wishes to sell it, his ability to do so is dependent upon his ability to find someone who has the money. Since buyers can have only such money as the government distributes through its purchases, loans and gifts (or such substitute money as its creature, the banker, will authorize) it may be seen that buying is subject to grant, just as, in the case of a patent, selling is subject to grant. In the case of patents, the patent holder is the grantee of veto power; in the case of money, the banker is the grantee of the veto power. These two are the breeders of our monopolies and of the two, the money granting and vetoing power is by far the greater. It in fact makes possible the acquisition of the patent granting power from inventors who, not having money power, are obliged to sell to those who have. The government, which promulgates laws against monopolies in restraint of competition, is itself the author of these twin creators of monopolies.

E. C. Riegel

Source: http://www.mind-trek.com/treatise/ecr-pem/ch2.htm

Contributed by: peter

A Quote by E. C. Riegel on money, politics, money-making, prosperity, wealth, govern, and government

The first cardinal truth of money is that no one, whether individual or government, can issue money without buying something. By inviting government to become a money issuer, we invite it to become our customer. Then we quarrel with it if it tries to buy something that we deem within the province of private enterprise.

The second cardinal truth of money is that money must be backed with something, and the act of backing can only be the act of selling. Since we object to government buying and selling anything useful, but nevertheless insist that it issue money, we force it into boondoggling or public works that do not conflict with our private enterprise. Thus we compel government to issue unbacked money by making it impossible for it to sell anything in exchange for the money it issues. As this process of issuing unbacked money continues, each unit grows weaker and thus the dosage must be increased. Hedged about, as government is, by our objections to its invading private enterprise and yet keeping it under the pressure to issue money, it is ultimately forced to the most consummate public works spending program, which is war.

E. C. Riegel

Source: http://www.mind-trek.com/treatise/ecr-pem/intro.htm

Contributed by: peter

A Quote by E. C. Riegel on money, politics, money-making, prosperity, wealth, govern, and government

Money is an instrumentality of the profit motive and must be issued and backed only by private enterprisers. Economic and political perversities are inescapable while government is admitted to money power. Since all national governments have, up to the present, been money issuing powers we may justly attribute all the economic and political ills of mankind to this single error.

E. C. Riegel

Source: http://www.mind-trek.com/treatise/ecr-pem/intro.htm

Contributed by: peter

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