pity

A Quote by William Shakespeare on action, angels, day, deed, doubt, envy, friendship, good, heart, honor, ingratitude, judgment, kindness, love, men, nobility, overcoming, perception, pity, power, preparation, privacy, reason, soul, speech, tears, time,

If you have tears, prepare to shed them now. You all do know this mantle: I remember The first time ever Caesar put it on; 'Twas on a summer's evening, in his tent, That day he overcame the Nervii: Look, in this place ran Cassius' dagger through: See what a rent the envious Casca made: Through this the well-beloved Brutus stabb'd; And as he pluck'd his cursed steel away, Mark how the blood of Caesar follow'd it, As rushing out of doors, to be resolved If Brutus so unkindly knock'd, or no; For Brutus, as you know, was Caesar's angel: Judge, O you gods, how dearly Caesar loved him! This was the most unkindest cut of all; For when the noble Caesar saw him stab, Ingratitude, more strong than traitors' arms, Quite vanquish'd him: then burst his mighty heart; And, in his mantle muffling up his face, Even at the base of Pompey's Statua, Which all the while ran blood, great Cæsar fell, O! what a fall was there, my countrymen; Then I, and you, and all of us fell down, Whilst bloody treason flourish'd over us. O! now you weep, and I perceive you feel The dint of pity; these are gracious drops. Kind souls, what, weep you when you but behold Our Caesar's vesture wounded? Look you here, Here is himself, marr'd, as you see, with traitors. . . . . Good friends, sweet friends, let me not stir you up To such a sudden flood of mutiny. They that have done this deed are honourable: What private griefs they have, alas! I know not, That made them do it; they are wise and honourable, And will no doubts with reason answer you. I come not, friends, to steal away your hearts: I am no orator, as Brutus is; But, as you know me all, a plain blunt man, That love my friend. . . . . For I have neither wit, nor words, nor worth, Action , nor utterance, nor power of speech, To stir men's blood; I only speak right on; I tell you that which you yourselves do know.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Julius Cæsar, Mark Antony in Act 3, scene 2.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on men and pity

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The more pity that fools may not speak wisely what wise men do foolishly.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: As You Like It, Act 1, Scene 2

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Pitt, "the Elder Pitt on pity and unhappiness

A strong nor'wester's blowing, Bill, Hark! Don't ye hear it roar, now? Lord help 'em, how I pities all Unhappy folks on shore now!

William Pitt (1708 - 1778)

Source: The Sailor’s Consolation, st 1

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Faulkner on compassion, courage, glory, heart, honor, hope, needs, past, pity, poets, pride, privilege, sacrifice, and writers

It is his [the poet's, the writer's] privilege to help man endure by lifting his heart, by reminding him of the courage and honor and hope and pride and compassion and pity and sacrifice which have been the glory of his past. The poet's voice need not merely be the record of man, it can be one of the props, the pillars to help him endure and prevail. See Poets & Writers

William Faulkner (1897 - 1962)

Source: the Speech receiving the Nobel Prize for literature, Stockholm, 12/10/50

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Faulkner on compassion, courage, duty, glory, heart, honor, hope, needs, past, pity, poets, pride, privilege, sacrifice, and writers

The poet's, the writer's, duty is to write about these things. It is his privilege to help man endure by lifting his heart, by reminding him of the courage and honor and hope and pride and compassion and pity and sacrifice which have been the glory of the past. The poet's voice need not merely be the record of man; it can be one of the props, the pillars, to help him endure and prevail. See Poets & Writers

William Faulkner (1897 - 1962)

Source: the original draft of speech receiving the Nobel Prize for literature, Stockholm, 12/10/50

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Faulkner on compassion, heart, honor, love, pity, poets, sacrifice, teaching, and writers

He [the writer] must, teach himself that the basest of all things is to be afraid; and, teaching himself that, forget it forever, leaving no room in his workshop for anything but the old verities and truths of the heart, the old universal truths lacking which any story is ephemeral and doomed - love and honor and pity and compassion and sacrifice. See Poets & Writers

William Faulkner (1897 - 1962)

Source: the Speech receiving the Nobel Prize for literature, Stockholm, 12/10/50

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Faulkner on acceptance, belief, compassion, courage, death, duty, endurance, glory, heart, honor, hope, immortality, literature, needs, newspapers, originality, past, pity, poets, pride, privilege, sacrifice, soul, spirit, and time

I decline to accept the end of man. It is easy enough to say that man is immortal simply because he will endure: that when the last ding-dong of doom has clanged and faded from the last worthless rock hanging tideless in the last red and dying evening, that even then there will still be one more sound: that of his puny inexhaustible voice, still talking. I refuse to accept this. I believe that man will not merely endure: he will prevail. He is immortal, not because he alone among creatures has an inexhaustible voice, but because he has a soul, a spirit capable of compassion and sacrifice and endurance. The poet's, the writer's, duty is to write about these things. It is his privilege to help man endure by lifting his heart, by reminding him of the courage and honor and hope and pride and compassion and pity and sacrifice which have been the glory of his past. The poet's voice need not merely be the record of man, it can be one of the props, the pillars to help him endure and prevail. WILLIAM FAULKNER, address upon receiving the Nobel Prize for literature, Stockholm, Sweden, December 10, 1950. - Faulkner, Essays, Speeches & Public Letters, p. 120 (1951). This text is from Faulkner's original typescript; it was slightly revised from that which he delivered in Stockholm, and which was published in American newspapers at the time (p. 121).

William Faulkner (1897 - 1962)

Source: the original draft of speech receiving the Nobel Prize for literature, Stockholm, 12/10/50

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Cowper on day, forgiveness, and pity

The kindest and the happiest pair Will find occasion to forbear; And something, every day they live, To pity, and perhaps forgive.

William Cowper (1731 - 1800)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Butler Yeats on heart, love, and pity

A pity beyond all telling Is hid in the heart of love.

William Butler Yeats (1865 - 1939)

Source: The Rose, 1893. The Pity of Love

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Blake on children, divinity, fatherhood, god, judaism, love, mercy, peace, pity, and thankfulness

To Mercy Pity Peace and Love All pray in their distress, And to these virtues of delight Return their thankfulness. For Mercy Pity Peace and Love Is God our father dear. And Mercy Pity Peace and Love Is Man his child and care. Then every man of every clime That prays in his distress Prays to the human form divine: Love Mercy Pity Peace. And all must love the human form In heathen, Turk, or Jew. Where Mercy, Love and Pity dwell There God is dwelling too.

William Blake (1757 - 1827)

Source: "The Divine Image" from Songs of Innocence

Contributed by: Zaady

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