merit

A Quote by Mark Twain on dogs, heaven, and merit

Heaven is by favor; if it were by merit your dog would go in and you would stay out.

Mark Twain (1835 - 1910)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Marquise Magdeleine de Sablé on deception, kindness, merit, needs, and uncertainty

Although most friendships that exist do not merit the name, we can nevertheless make use of them in accordance with our needs, as a kind of commercial venture based on uncertain foundations and in which we are very often deceived.

Magdeleine Sable (c. 1599 - 1678)

Source: the Marquise Sablé’s work is in Maxims and Various Thoughts (Maximes et pensées diverses) 1678

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A Quote by Marquise Magdeleine de Sablé on fashion, good, knowledge, manners, merit, and wisdom

True merit does not depend on the times or on fashion. Those who have no other advantage than courtly manners lose it when they are away from court. But good sense, knowledge, and wisdom make their possessors knowledgeable and beloved in all ages and in all times.

Magdeleine Sable (c. 1599 - 1678)

Source: the Marquise Sablé’s work is in Maxims and Various Thoughts (Maximes et pensées diverses) 1678

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Philip Dormer Stanhope, Lord Chesterfield on discovery, kindness, and merit

Real merit of any kind cannot long be concealed; it will be discovered, and nothing can depreciate it but a man exhibiting it himself. It may not always be rewarded as it ought; but it will always be known.

Lord Chesterfield Stanhope (1694 - 1773)

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A Quote by Philip Dormer Stanhope, Lord Chesterfield on friendship and merit

Real friendship is a slow grower, and never thrives unless engrafted upon a stock of known and reciprocal merit.

Lord Chesterfield Stanhope (1694 - 1773)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Philip Dormer Stanhope, Lord Chesterfield on merit and world

Great merit, or great failings, will make you respected or despised; but trifles, little attentions, mere nothings, either done or neglected, will make you either liked or disliked in the general run of the world.

Lord Chesterfield Stanhope (1694 - 1773)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron on earth, heaven, hell, hope, and merit

In hope to merit heaven by making earth a hell.

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Source: Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, Canto i. Stanza 20.

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A Quote by Lewis Fry Richardson on choice and merit

Another advantage of a mathematical statement is that it is so definite that it might be definitely wrong; and if it is found to be wrong, there is a plenteous choice of amendments ready in the mathematicians' stock of formulae. Some verbal statements have not this merit; they are so vague that they could hardly be wrong, and are correspondingly useless.

Lewis Fry Richardson (1881 - 1953)

Source: Mathematics of War and Foreign Politics.

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A Quote by John Milton on devil, gold, merit, and wealth

High on a throne of royal state, which far Outshone the wealth of Ormus and of Ind, Or where the gorgeous East with richest hand Showers on her kings barbaric pearl and gold, Satan exalted sat, by merit rais'd To that bad eminence.

John Milton (1608 - 1674)

Source: Paradise Lost. Book ii. Line 1.

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A Quote by John Locke on age, authority, birth, equality, freedom, gratitude, justice, men, merit, nature, respect, understanding, and virtue

Though I have said above. . . . That all men by Nature are equal, I cannot be supposed to understand all sorts of Equality: Age or Virtue may give Men a just Precedency: Excellency of Parts and Merit may place others above the common level: Birth may subject some, and Alliance or Benefits others, to pay an Observance to those to whom Nature, Gratitude or other Respects may have made it due; and yet all this consists with the Equality which all men are in, in respect of Jurisdiction or Dominion one over another, which was the Equality I there spoke of . . . being that equal Right that every Man hath, to his natural Freedom, without being subjected to the Will or Authority of any other Man.

John Locke (1632 - 1704)

Source: Second Treatise of Government, 1690

Contributed by: Zaady

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