libraries

A Quote by Ray Bradbury on future, libraries, and past

Without libraries what have we? We have no past and no future.

Ray Bradbury (1920 -)

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A Quote by Ralph Waldo Emerson on books, college, and libraries

The colleges, while they provide us with libraries, furnish no professors of books; and I think no chair is so much needed.

Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803 - 1882)

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A Quote by Ralph Waldo Emerson on acceptance, books, duty, libraries, and men

Meek young men grow up in libraries, believing it their duty to accept the views which Cicero, which Locke, which Bacon, have given, forgetful that Cicero, Locke, and Bacon were only young men in libraries, when they wrote these books.

Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803 - 1882)

Source: Lecture, 31 Aug. 1837, delivered before the Phi Beta Kappa Society, Harvard University;

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A Quote by Ralph Waldo Emerson on age, company, etiquette, friendship, immortality, impatience, libraries, men, thought, and words

Consider what you have in the smallest well-chosen library-a company of the wisest and wittiest men which can be plucked out of all civilized countries in a thousand years. The men themselves were then hidden and inaccessible. They were solitary, impatient of interruption, and fenced by etiquette. But now they are immortal, and the thought they did not reveal, even to their bosom friends, is here written out in transparent words of light to us, who are strangers of another age.

Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803 - 1882)

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A Quote by Patrick Jake "P.J." O'Rourke on books, brothers, celebrity, determination, diet, exercise, imagination, libraries, life, majorities, population, and women

Imagine of all of life were determined by majority rule. Every meal would be a pizza. Every pair of pants, even those in a Brooks Brothers suit, would be stonewashed denim. Celebrity diet and exercise books would be the only thing on library shelves. And-since women are a majority of the population-we'd all be married to Mel Gibson.

P.J. O'Rourke (1947 -)

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A Quote by Norman Cousins on birth, fame, history, ideas, libraries, life, and metaphor

A library, to modify the famous metaphor of Socrates, should be the delivery room for the birth of ideas a place where history comes to life.

Norman Cousins (1912 - 1990)

Source: American Library Association "Bulletin," October 1954

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A Quote by Norman Cousins on birth, books, fame, history, ideas, libraries, life, literature, metaphor, and worship

The library is not a shrine for the worship of books. It is not a temple where literary incense must be burned or where one's one devotion to the bound book is expressed in ritual. A library, to modify the famous metaphor of Socrates, should be the delivery room for the birth of ideas - a place where history comes to life.

Norman Cousins (1912 - 1990)

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A Quote by Mark Twain on books, congress, darkness, libraries, and life

Suppose . . . burglars had made entry into this . . . [library]. Picture them seated here on this floor, pouring the light of their dark-lanterns over some books they found, and thus absorbing moral truths and getting moral uplift. The whole course of their lives would have been changed. As it was, they kept straight on in their immoral way and were sent to jail. For all I know, they may next be sent to Congress.

Mark Twain (1835 - 1910)

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A Quote by Malcolm X on books, curiosity, good, justice, libraries, life, reading, and rest

My Alma mater was books, a good library . . . . I could spend the rest of my life reading, just satisfying my curiosity.

Malcolm X (1925 - 1965)

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A Quote by Louisa May Alcott on learning, libraries, mind, possessions, sympathy, attitude, beauty, and perspective

When Emerson's library was burning at Concord, I went to him as he stood with the firelight on his strong, sweet face, and endeavored to express my sympathy for the loss of his most valued possessions, but he answered cheerily, 'Never mind, Louisa, see what a beautiful blaze they make! We will enjoy that now.' The lesson was one never forgotten and in the varied lessons that have come to me I have learned to look for something beautiful and bright.

Louisa May Alcott (1832 - 1888)

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