kindness

A Quote by Bertrand Arthur William Russell on acceptance, certainty, discovery, expectation, faith, kindness, knowledge, mathematics, people, religion, rest, security, teachers, thought, work, and world

I wanted certainty in the kind of way in which people want religious faith. I thought that certainty is more likely to be found in mathematics than elsewhere. But I discovered that many mathematical demonstrations, which my teachers expected me to accept, were full of fallacies, and that, if certainty were indeed discoverable in mathematics, it would be in a new field of mathematics, with more solid foundations than those that had hitherto been thought secure. But as the work proceeded, I was continually reminded of the fable about the elephant and the tortoise. having constructed an elephant upon which the mathematical world could rest, I found the elephant tottering, and proceeded to construct a tortoise to keep the elephant from falling. But the tortoise was no more secure than the elephant, and after some twenty years of very arduous toil, I came to the conclusion that there was nothing more that I could do in the way of making mathematical knowledge indubitable.

Bertrand Russell (1872 - 1970)

Source: Portraits from Memory.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Bernard de Voto on generosity, kindness, life, men, men and women, vision, water, and women

The water of life was given to us to make us see for a while that we are more nearly men and women, more nearly kind and gentle and generous, pleasanter and stronger than without its vision there is any evidence we are.

Bernard de Voto (1897 - 1955)

Source: The Hour, 1951

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Bernard de Voto on criticism, kindness, skill, tennis, and wisdom

Between the amateur and the professional . . . there is a difference not only in degree but in kind. The skillful man is, within the function of his skill, a different integration, a different nervous and muscular and psychological organization. . . . A tennis player or a watchmaker or an airplane pilot is an automatism but he is also criticism and wisdom.

Bernard de Voto (1897 - 1955)

Source: Across the Wide Missouri, 1947

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Benjamin Franklin on kindness, posterity, and respect

We are a kind of posterity in respect to them.

Benjamin Franklin (1706 - 1790)

Source: Letter to William Strahan, 1745.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Benjamin Franklin on kindness

He that has done you a kindness will be more ready to do you another, than he whom you yourself have obliged.

Benjamin Franklin (1706 - 1790)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Bartolomé de Las Casas on good, kindness, life, love, men, order, persuasion, rudeness, and world

It clearly appears that there are no races in the world, however rude, uncultivated, barbarous, gross, or almost brutal they may be, who cannot be persuaded and brought to a good order and way of life, and made domestic, mild and tractable, provided . . . the method that is proper and natural to men is used; that is, love and gentleness and kindness.

Bartolome de Las Casas (1474 - 1566)

Source: Apologetica Historia (Apologetic History) de las Indias, written c. 1530, ch. 48

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ayn Rand on endurance, history, kindness, men, mind, and world

Why should this seem so startling? There is only one kind of men who have never been on strike in human history. Every other kind and class have stopped, when they so wished, and have presented demands to the world, claiming to be indispensable - except the men who have carried the world on their shoulders, have kept it alive, have endured torture as sole payment, but have never walked out on the human race. Well, their turn has come. Let the world discover who they are, what they do and what happens when they refuse to function. This is the strike of the men of the mind. This is the mind on strike.

Ayn Rand (1905 - 1982)

Source: (Atlas 681)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ayn Rand on certainty, confidence, dedication, experience, future, kindness, love, prayer, and spirit

I sat there beside him till morning - and as I watched his face in the starlight, then the first ray of the sun on his untroubled forehead and closed eyelids, what I experienced was not a prayer, I do not pray, but that state of spirit at which a prayer is a misguided attempt: a full, confident, affirming self-dedication to my love of the right, to the certainty that the right would win and that this boy would have the kind of future he deserved. . . . I did not expect it to be as great as this - or as hard.

Ayn Rand (1905 - 1982)

Source: (Atlas 727)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ayn Rand on age, citizenship, crime, government, guilt, impossibility, innocence, justice, kindness, laws, men, nations, observation, power, and understanding

Did you really think that we wanted those laws to be observed? . . . We want them broken. You'd better get it straight that it's not a bunch of boy scouts you're up against - then you'll know that this is not the age for beautiful gestures. We're after power and we mean it. You fellows were pikers, but we know the real trick, and you'd better get wise to it. There's no way to rule innocent men. The only power any government has is the power to crack down on criminals. Well, when there aren't enough criminals, one makes them. One declares so many things to be a crime that it becomes impossible for men to live without breaking laws. Who wants a nation of law-abiding citizens? What's there in that for anyone? But just pass the kind of laws that can neither be observed nor enforced nor objectively interpreted - and you create a nation of law-breakers - and then you cash in on guilt. Now that's the system, that's the game, and once you understand it, you'll be much easier to deal with.

Ayn Rand (1905 - 1982)

Source: (Atlas 406)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ayn Rand on change, fear, joy, kindness, men, purpose, ugliness, and world

I don't know. But I've watched them here for twenty years and I've seen the change. They used to rush through here, and it was wonderful to watch, it was the hurry of men who knew where they were going and were eager to get there. Now they're hurrying because they are afraid. It's not a purpose that drives them, it's fear. They're not going anywhere, they're escaping. And I don't think they know what it is that they want to escape. They don't look at one another. They jerk when brushed against. They smile too much, but it's an ugly kind of smiling: it's not joy, it's pleading. I don't know what it is that's happening to the world.

Ayn Rand (1905 - 1982)

Source: (Atlas 64)

Contributed by: Zaady

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