idleness

A Quote by Thomas Traherne on action, idleness, rest, and soul

The soul is made for action, and cannot rest till it be employed. Idleness is its rust. Unless it will up and think and taste and see, all is in vain.

Thomas Traherne (c. 1637 - 1674)

Source: ca. 1672

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Gray on confusion, conquest, and idleness

Ruin seize thee, ruthless king! Confusion on thy banners wait! Though fann'd by Conquest's crimson wing, They mock the air with idle state.

Thomas Gray (1716 - 1771)

Source: The Bard. I. 1, Line 1.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Fuller on devil, idleness, and temptation

He that is busy is tempted by but one devil; he that is idle, by a legion.

Thomas Fuller (1608 - 1661)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Carlyle on despair, hope, idleness, and work

There is a perennial nobleness, and even sacredness, in work. Were he never so benighted, forgetful of his high calling, there is always hope in a man that actually and earnestly works: in idleness alone there is perpetual despair.

Thomas Carlyle (1795 - 1881)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas á Kempis on good, idleness, reading, and writing

Never be entirely idle: but either be reading, or writing, or praying, or meditating, or endeavouring something for the public good.

Thomas a Kempis (1380 - 1471)

Source: Imitatio Christi

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Theodore Roosevelt on america, civilization, community, conflict, conquest, day, debt, humanity, idleness, impatience, interest, judgment, mankind, morality, nations, needs, rudeness, rules, sentimentality, stability, success, war, and world

Theodore Roosevelt, impatient with the excesses of "purely sentimental historians," authored his own stirring vindication of America's relations with the Indians: Looked at from the standpoint of the ultimate result, there was little real difference to the Indian whether the land was taken by treaty or by war. . . . No treaty could be satisfactory to the whites, no treaty served the needs of humanity and civilization, unless it gave the land to the Americans as unreservedly as any successful war. Whether the whites won the land by treaty, by armed conflict, or, as was actually the case, by a mixture of both, mattered comparatively little so long as the land was won. It was all-important that it should be won, for the benefit of civilization and in the interests of mankind. It is, indeed, a warped, perverse, and silly morality which would forbid a course of conquest that has turned whole continents into the seats of mighty and flourishing civilized nations. . . . It is as idle to apply to savages the rules of international morality which obtain between stable and cultured communities, as it would be to judge the fifth-century English conquest of Britain by the standards of to-day. The most ultimately righteous of all wars is a war with savages, though it is apt to be also the most terrible and inhuman. The rude, fierce settler who drives the savage from the land lays all civilized mankind under a debt to him. . . . It is of incalculable importance that America, Australia, and Siberia should pass out of the hands of their red, black, and yellow aboriginal owners, and become the heritage of the dominant world races.

Theodore Roosevelt (1858 - 1919)

Source: The Winning of the West: Book IV, 1896

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Socrates on idleness

He is not only idle who does nothing, but he is idle who might be better employed.

Socrates (469 - 399 BC)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir William Schwenck Gilbert on anxiety, culture, idleness, kindness, lies, meaning, mind, novelty, and plants

If you're anxious for to shine in the high aesthetic line As a man of culture rare, You must get up all the germs of the transcendental terms And plant them everywhere. You must lie upon the daisies and discourse in novel phrases Of your complicated state of mind, The meaning doesn't matter if it's only idle chatter Of a transendental kind.

Sir William Schwenck Gilbert (1836 - 1911)

Source: Bunthorne's Song from Patience

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Samuel Taylor Coleridge on idleness

As idle as a painted ship Upon a painted ocean.

Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772 - 1834)

Source: The Ancient Mariner. Part ii.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Samuel Smiles on idleness and laws

No laws, however stringent, can make the idle industrious, the thriftless provident, or the drunken sober.

Samuel Smiles (1812 - 1904)

Source: Self-Help.

Contributed by: Zaady

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