honor

A Quote by William George Jordan on crime, honor, impossibility, life, sacred, and truth

Truth is not a dress-suit, consecrated to special occasions, it is the strong, well-woven, durable homespun for daily living. Let us cultivate that sterling honor that holds our word so supreme, so sacred, that to forget it would seem a crime, to deny it would be impossible.

William Jordan

Source: The Power of Truth, pp. 10-11.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Faulkner on compassion, courage, glory, heart, honor, hope, needs, past, pity, poets, pride, privilege, sacrifice, and writers

It is his [the poet's, the writer's] privilege to help man endure by lifting his heart, by reminding him of the courage and honor and hope and pride and compassion and pity and sacrifice which have been the glory of his past. The poet's voice need not merely be the record of man, it can be one of the props, the pillars to help him endure and prevail. See Poets & Writers

William Faulkner (1897 - 1962)

Source: the Speech receiving the Nobel Prize for literature, Stockholm, 12/10/50

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Faulkner on compassion, courage, duty, glory, heart, honor, hope, needs, past, pity, poets, pride, privilege, sacrifice, and writers

The poet's, the writer's, duty is to write about these things. It is his privilege to help man endure by lifting his heart, by reminding him of the courage and honor and hope and pride and compassion and pity and sacrifice which have been the glory of the past. The poet's voice need not merely be the record of man; it can be one of the props, the pillars, to help him endure and prevail. See Poets & Writers

William Faulkner (1897 - 1962)

Source: the original draft of speech receiving the Nobel Prize for literature, Stockholm, 12/10/50

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Faulkner on art, books, dreams, good, happiness, honor, motherhood, peace, pride, responsibility, security, and worth

The writer's only responsibility is to his art. He will be completely ruthless if he is a good one. He has a dream. It anguishes him so much he must get rid of it. He has no peace until then. Everything goes by the board: honor, pride, decency, security, happiness, all, to get the book written. If a writer has to rob his mother, he will not hesitate; the "Ode on a Grecian Urn" is worth any number of old ladies.

William Faulkner (1897 - 1962)

Source: an interview with Faulkner in New York City, 1956, by JEAN Stein. From Writers at Work

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Faulkner on compassion, heart, honor, love, pity, poets, sacrifice, teaching, and writers

He [the writer] must, teach himself that the basest of all things is to be afraid; and, teaching himself that, forget it forever, leaving no room in his workshop for anything but the old verities and truths of the heart, the old universal truths lacking which any story is ephemeral and doomed - love and honor and pity and compassion and sacrifice. See Poets & Writers

William Faulkner (1897 - 1962)

Source: the Speech receiving the Nobel Prize for literature, Stockholm, 12/10/50

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Faulkner on acceptance, belief, compassion, courage, death, duty, endurance, glory, heart, honor, hope, immortality, literature, needs, newspapers, originality, past, pity, poets, pride, privilege, sacrifice, soul, spirit, and time

I decline to accept the end of man. It is easy enough to say that man is immortal simply because he will endure: that when the last ding-dong of doom has clanged and faded from the last worthless rock hanging tideless in the last red and dying evening, that even then there will still be one more sound: that of his puny inexhaustible voice, still talking. I refuse to accept this. I believe that man will not merely endure: he will prevail. He is immortal, not because he alone among creatures has an inexhaustible voice, but because he has a soul, a spirit capable of compassion and sacrifice and endurance. The poet's, the writer's, duty is to write about these things. It is his privilege to help man endure by lifting his heart, by reminding him of the courage and honor and hope and pride and compassion and pity and sacrifice which have been the glory of his past. The poet's voice need not merely be the record of man, it can be one of the props, the pillars to help him endure and prevail. WILLIAM FAULKNER, address upon receiving the Nobel Prize for literature, Stockholm, Sweden, December 10, 1950. - Faulkner, Essays, Speeches & Public Letters, p. 120 (1951). This text is from Faulkner's original typescript; it was slightly revised from that which he delivered in Stockholm, and which was published in American newspapers at the time (p. 121).

William Faulkner (1897 - 1962)

Source: the original draft of speech receiving the Nobel Prize for literature, Stockholm, 12/10/50

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Wheeler McMillen on animals, belief, blessings, children, cities, citizenship, communism, dance, earth, freedom, god, good, honor, labor, laws, liberty, magic, managers, men, men and women, miracles, nature, neighbors, peace, people, rules, sc

We are American farmers. We are Americans. We are farmers. Our grandsires freed this virgin continent,plowed it from East to West, and gave it to us.This land is for us and for our children tomake richer and more fruitful. We grow foods, fibers - fifteen times asmuch as we use. We grow men and women -- farmers, Presidents, and Senators, generals of industry,captains of commerce, missionaries, builders. Communists would call us capitalists, because we own land and we own tools. Capitalists might choose to call us laborers,because we work with our hands. Others may call us managers, because wedirect men and manage materials. Our children call us "Dad." We are also deacons, stockholders, mechanics, veterinarians, electricians, schoolboard members, Rotarians, voters, scientists,neighbors, men of good will. Our rules are Nature's rules, the laws of God. We command the magic of the seasons andthe miracles of science, because we obey Nature's rules. Our raw materials are soil and seed, animals, the atmosphere and the rain, and the mighty sun. We work with brains. We toil with musclesof steel, fed by the fires of lightning and byoils from the inner earth. We are partners with the laboratory, withthe factory, and with all the people. We provide industry with ever-renewableraw materials from the inexhaustible world ofplants. We buy products from the labor ofevery fellow-citizen.Our efficiencies have raised great cities andhappy towns, and have given all the peoplemeat and bread. We believe in work and in honor We believe in freedom. We are grateful for the American freedomthat has let us earn so many blessings. We know that liberty is our most preciouspossession. At the ballot-boxes and on thebattlefield we shall defend it. We have proven a new pattern of abun-dance. We pray that we may also help tomake a pattern for peace.

Wheeler McMillen

Source: American Farmers

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Wayland Zwayer, DD. on death, honor, hope, justice, life, needs, peace, people, promises, religion, truth, and world

A religion that serves today's needs and holds tomorrow's promise should not consist of dying forms and cold rituals, but of living hope and friendly righteousness. Justice, honor, and truth will be found where righteousness is found. If all people return to religion and find peace, the world will find peace.

Wayland Zwayer

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by W. Kelly Griffith on dignity, honesty, honor, and work

Any necessary work that pays an honest wage carries its own honor and dignity.

W. Kelly Griffith

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Viktor E. Frankl on achievement, action, bliss, brevity, fulfillment, honor, understanding, and world

I understood how a man who has nothing left in this world may still know bliss, be it only for a brief moment, in the contemplation of his beloved. In a position of utter desolation, when a man cannot express himself in positive action, when his only achievement may consist in enduring his sufferings in the right way - an honorable way - in such a position man can, through loving contemplation of the image he carries of his beloved, achieve fulfillment.

Viktor Frankl (1905 - 1997)

Source: Dr. Victor E. Frankl in Man’s Search for Meaning, Simon and Schuster, NY, 1963.

Contributed by: Zaady

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