history

A Quote by "Mahatma" Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi on despair, history, love, time, and truth

When I despair, I remember that all through history the way of truth and love has always won. There have been tyrants and murderers and for a time they seem invincible but in the end, they always fall.  Think of it - always.

Gandhi (1869 - 1948)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by "Mahatma" Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi on bravery, confidence, force, history, leadership, men, self-confidence, tenacity, and world

The history of the world is full of men who rose to leadership, by sheer force of self-confidence, bravery and tenacity.

Gandhi (1869 - 1948)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by "Mahatma" Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi on history and nations

Among the many misdeeds of the British rule in India, history will look upon the act depriving a whole nation of arms as the blackest.

Gandhi (1869 - 1948)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by "Mahatma" Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi on argument, belief, dignity, and history

To believe that what has not occurred in history will not occur at all, is to argue disbelief in the dignity of man.

Gandhi (1869 - 1948)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by G. Steiner on chess, contentment, history, investment, kindness, mathematics, music, police, reality, and wealth

For all their wealth of content, for all the sum of history and social institution invested in them, music, mathematics, and chess are resplendently useless (applied mathematics is a higher plumbing, a kind of music for the police band). They are metaphysically trivial, irresponsible. They refuse to relate outward, to take reality for arbiter. This is the source of their witchery.

G. Steiner

Source: The American Mathematical Monthly, v. 101, no. 9, November, 1994.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by G. Sarton on beauty, dignity, duty, effort, generations, genius, greatness, history, humanity, humility, mathematics, men, pride, privilege, study, thankfulness, and wonder

The main duty of the historian of mathematics, as well as his fondest privilege, is to explain the humanity of mathematics, to illustrate its greatness, beauty and dignity, and to describe how the incessant efforts and accumulated genius of many generations have built up that magnificent monument, the object of our most legitimate pride as men, and of our wonder, humility and thankfulness, as individuals. The study of the history of mathematics will not make better mathematicians but gentler ones, it will enrich their minds, mellow their hearts, and bring out their finer qualities.

G. Sarton

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Friedrich Ratzel on beginning, conviction, earth, existence, heaven, history, laws, and philosophy

A philosophy of the history of the human race, worthy of its name, must begin with the heavens and descend to the earth, must be charged with the conviction that all existence is one-a single conception sustained from beginning to end upon one identical law.

Friedrich Ratzel

Source: The Outline of History by H. G. Wells, 1920

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A Quote by Freeman Dyson on animals, cities, civilization, climate, consequences, darkness, dependence, good, greatness, history, horses, ideas, inventions, life, motives, needs, power, simplicity, technology, and theory

The technologies which have had the most profound effects on human life are usually simple. A good example of a simple technology with profound historical consequences is hay. Nobody knows who invented hay, the idea of cutting grass in the autumn and storing it in large enough quantities to keep horses and cows alive through the winter. All we know is that the technology of hay was unknown to the Roman Empire but was known to every village of medieval Europe. Like many other crucially important technologies, hay emerged anonymously during the so-called Dark Ages. According to the Hay Theory of History, the invention of hay was the decisive event which moved the center of gravity of urban civilization from the Mediterranean basin to Northern and Western Europe. The Roman Empire did not need hay because in a Mediterranean climate the grass grows well enough in winter for animals to graze. North of the Alps, great cities dependent on horses and oxen for motive power could not exist without hay. So it was hay that allowed populations to grow and civilizations to flourish among the forests of Northern Europe. Hay moved the greatness of Rome to Paris and London, and later to Berlin and Moscow and New York.

Freeman Dyson

Source: Freeman Dyson Infinite in All Directions, Harper and Row, New York, 1988, p 135.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Frederick Ward Kates on christianity, eternity, existence, fatherhood, god, history, jesus, knowledge, life, love, meaning, men, obedience, personality, personality, understanding, and virtue

The Christian clearly understands that Jesus does not reveal all that is signified by the word "God," but only as much as could be revealed through a perfect human personality living in absolute obedience to God's will. The knowledge of God that men have by virtue of Jesus' revelation is quite enough for men to live by in this life, and to live gloriously and thankfully by, Christians maintain - the knowledge that God the Creator, the Almighty and Eternal, the Lord of history, is man's Heavenly Father, and that love might well be, and indeed is, the ultimate meaning of human existence.

Frederick Ward Kates

Source: A Moment Between Two Eternities

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Frederick Russell Burnham, DSO on history, nations, and timidity

As far as we can look back into history, the downfall of any nation can be traced from the moment that nation became timid about spending its best blood.

Frederick Russell Burnham (1861 - ?)

Contributed by: Zaady

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