heaven

A Quote by William Shakespeare on age, aim, ambition, angels, corruption, country, enemies, envy, fear, god, heaven, honesty, hope, integrity, justice, love, peace, silence, truth, and zeal

Cromwell, I charge thee, fling away ambition: By that sin fell the angels; how can man, then, The image of his Maker, hope to win by it? Love thyself last: cherish those hearts that hate thee; Corruption wins not more than honesty. Still in thy right hand carry gentle peace, To silence envious tongues. Be just, and fear not: Let all the ends thou aim'st at be thy country's, Thy God's, and truth's; then if thou fall'st, O Cromwell, Thou fall'st a blessed martyr! Serve the king; And,-prithee, lead me in: There take an inventory of all I have, To the last penny; 'tis the king's: my robe, And my integrity to heaven, is all I dare now call mine own. O Cromwell, Cromwell! Had I but served my God with half the zeal I served my king, he would not in mine age Have left me naked to mine enemies.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: King Henry VIII, Cardinal Wolsey in Act 3, scene 2.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on body and heaven

Patch up thine old body for heaven.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: King Henry IV

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on force, gifts, heaven, and merit

The force of his own merit makes his way-a gift that heaven gives for him.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: KING HENRY VIII, Act 1, Scene 1

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on heaven and words

Words without thoughts never to heaven go.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Hamlet, Act 3, scene 3.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on heaven and words

My words fly up, my thoughts remain below; Words without thoughts never to heaven go.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Hamlet, Act 3, Scene 3

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on death and heaven

When beggars die, there are no comets seen; The heavens themselves blaze forth the death of princes.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Julius Caesar, Act 2, Scene 2

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on character, heaven, history, kindness, and life

There is a kind of character in thy life, That to the observer doth thy history Fully unfold. Thyself and thy belongings Are not thine own so proper as to waste Thyself upon thy virtues, they on thee. Heaven doth with us as we with torches do, Not light them for themselves; for if our virtues Did not go forth of us, 'twere all alike As if we had them not.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Measure For Measure, Act 1, scene 1.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on emptiness, heaven, hunger, jealousy, and time

ROMEO to BALTHASAR But if thou, jealous, dost return to pry In what I further shall intend to do, By heaven, I will tear thee joint by joint And strew this hungry churchyard with thy limbs: The time and my intents are savage-wild, More fierce and more inexorable far Than empty tigers or the roaring sea.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Romeo and Juliet, Act 5, Scene 3

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on death, deed, dignity, excellence, heaven, husbands, nature, power, and temptation

They that have power to hurt and will do none, That do not do the thing they most do show, Who, moving others, are themselves as stone, Unmoved, cold, and to temptation slow; They rightly do inherit Heaven's graces, And husband nature's riches from expense; They are the lords and owners of their faces, Others but stewards of their excellence. The summer's flower is to the summer sweet, Though to itself it only live and die; But if that flower with base infection meet, The basest weed outbraves his dignity: For Sweetest things turn sourest by their deeds: Lilies that fester smell far worse than weeds.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Sonnet 94

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on angels, anger, authority, brevity, and heaven

Man, proud man, Drest in a little brief authority, Most ignorant of what he's most assur'd, His glassy essence, like an angry ape, Plays such fantastic tricks before high heaven, As make the angels weep.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: MEASURE FOR MEASURE, Act 2, Scene 2

Contributed by: Zaady

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