guilt

A Quote by Frederic William Farrar on admiration, agreement, army, conscience, contentment, darkness, deed, guilt, infidelity, inspiration, jesus, money, murder, pride, sons, soul, suffering, time, traditions, vices, virtue, weakness, women, and world

Why did not this multitude of ignorant pilgrims resist? Why did these greedy chafferers content themselves with dark scowls and muttered maledictions, while they suffered their oxen and sheep to be chased into the streets and themselves ejected, and their money flung rolling on the floor by one who was then young and unknown, and in the garb of despised Galilee? Why, in the same way we might ask, did Saul suffer Samuel to beard him in the very presence of his army? Why did David abjectly obey the orders of Joab? Why did Ahab not dare to arrest Elijah at the door of Naboth's vineyard? Because sin is weakness; because there is in the world nothing so abject as a guilty conscience, nothing so invincible as the sweeping tide of a Godlike indignation against all that is base and wrong. How could these paltry sacrilegious buyers and sellers, conscious of wrongdoing, oppose that scathing rebuke, or face the lightnings of those eyes that were enkindled by an outraged holiness? When Phinehas the priest was zealous for the Lord of Hosts, and drove through the bodies of the prince of Simeon and the Midianitish woman with one glorious thrust of his indignant spear, why did not guilty Israel avenge that splendid murder? Why did not every man of the tribe of Simeon become a Goel to the dauntless assassin? Because Vice cannot stand for one moment before Virtue's uplifted arm. Base and grovelling as they were, these money-mongering Jews felt, in all that remnant of their souls which was not yet eaten away by infidelity and avarice, that the Son of Man was right. Nay, even the Priests and Pharisees, and Scribes and Levites, devoured as they were by pride and formalism, could not condemn an act which might have been performed by a Nehemiah or a Judas Maccabaeus, and which agreed with all that was purest and best in their traditions. But when they had heard of this deed, or witnessed it, and had time to recover from the breathless mixture of admiration, disgust, and astonishment which it inspired, they came to Jesus, and though they did not dare to condemn what He had done, yet half indignantly asked Him for some sign that He had a right to act thus.

Frederic William Farrar (1831 - 1903)

Source: Farrar in The Life of Christ, p.151 & 152, quoted by James E. Talmage, Jesus the Christ, Ch.12, p.169

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ezra Taft Benson on blessings, children, god, gratitude, guilt, ingratitude, and life

God help us to be grateful for our blessings, never to be guilty of the sin of ingratitude, and to instill this same gratitude into the lives of our children. Someone has said that an ungrateful man is like a hog under a tree eating apples and never looking up to see where they come from.

Ezra Taft Benson (1899 - 1994)

Source: Teachings of Ezra Taft Benson", p. 364

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ezra Taft Benson on action, appearance, basketball, beginning, belief, change, character, cheating, circumstances, clarity, coaching, conscience, criticism, day, evil, god, guilt, heart, injustice, innocence, joy, judgment, justice, learning,

One day in the middle of an important examination in high school, the point of my lead pencil broke. In those days we used pocket knives to sharpen our pencils. I had forgotten my penknife and turned to ask a neighbor for his. The teacher saw this; he accused me of cheating. When I tried to explain, he gave me a tongue-lashing for lying; worse, he forbade me to play on the basketball team in the upcoming game. I could see that the more I protested the angrier he seemed to become. But again and again I stubbornly told what had happened. Even when the coach pleaded my cause, the teacher refused to budge. The disgrace was almost more than I could bear. Then, just minutes before the game, he had a change of heart and I was permitted to play. But there was no joy in it. We lost the game; and though that hurt, by far the deeper pain was being branded a cheat and a liar. Looking back. I know that lesson was God-sent. Character is shaped in just such crucibles. My parents believed me: they were understanding and encouraging. Supported by them and a clear conscience, I began to realize that when you are at peace with your Maker you can, if not ignore human criticism, at least rise above it. And I learned something else - the importance of avoiding even the appearance of evil. Though I was innocent, circumstance made me look guilty. Since this could so easily be true in many of life's situations, I made a resolution to keep even the appearance of my actions above question, as far as possible. And it struck me, too, that if this injustice happened to me, it could happen to others, and I must not judge their actions simply on appearances.

Ezra Taft Benson (1899 - 1994)

Source: Crossfire: The Eight Years with Eisenhower, p. 17.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Erica Mann Jong on guilt and women

Show me a woman who doesn't feel guilty and I'll show you a man.

Erica Mann Jong (1942 -)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Elbert Green Hubbard on guilt, justice, and punishment

Punishment - The justice that the guilty deal out to those that are caught.

Elbert Hubbard (1856 - 1915)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by General Dwight David Eisenhower on action, concern, feeling, guilt, practice, and privacy

I make it a practice to avoid hating anyone. If someone's been guilty of despicable actions, especially toward me, I try to forget him. I used to follow a practice-somewhat contrived, I admit-to write the man's name on a piece of scrap paper, drop it into the lowest drawer of my desk, and say to myself: "That finishes the incident, and so far as I'm concerned, that fellow. The drawer became over the years a sort of private wastebasket for crumpled-up spite and discarded personalities. Besides, it seemed to be effective, and helped me avoid harboring useless black feelings.

Dwight Eisenhower (1890 - 1969)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Dorothy Law Neite on acceptance, appreciation, approval, children, confidence, criticism, encouragement, faith, friendship, guilt, jealousy, justice, learning, life, love, patience, praise, ridicule, security, shame, shyness, tolerance, and wo

Children Learn What They Live If a child lives with criticism, he learns to condemn. If a child lives with hostility, he learns to fight. If a child lives with ridicule, he learns to be shy. If a child lives with jealousy, he learns to feel guilty. If a child lives with impropriety, he learns to feel shame. If a child lives with tolerance, he learns to be patient. If a child lives with encouragement he learns confidence If a child lives with praise, he learns to appreciate. He a child lives with fairness, he learns justice. If a child lives with security, he learns to have faith. If a child lives with approval, he learns to like himself. If a child lives with acceptance and friendship, he learns to find love in the world. With what is your child living?

Dorothy Law Neite

Source: ALBERT W. DAW COLLECTION

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Diadochus Proclus on beginning, guilt, life, order, and theory

It is well known that the man who first made public the theory of irrationals perished in a shipwreck in order that the inexpressible and unimaginable should ever remain veiled. And so the guilty man, who fortuitously touched on and revealed this aspect of living things, was taken to the place where he began and there is for ever beaten by the waves.

Diadochus Proclus (412 - 485)

Source: Scholium to Book X of Euclid V.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by David. J. Schwartz, PhD on body, day, environment, facts, feeling, force, gossip, guilt, men, mind, people, thinking, thought, and women

But there's another type of poison perhaps a little more insidious - thought poison - commonly called "gossip." Thought poison differs from body poison in two ways. It affects the mind, not the body, and it is more subtle. The person being poisoned usually doesn't know it. Thought-poison is subtle but it accomplishes "big" things. It reduces the size of our thinking by forcing us to concentrate on petty, unimportant things. It warps and twists our thinking about people because it is based on a distortion of facts, and it creates a guilt feeling in us that shows through when we meet the person we've gossiped about. Thought-poison is 0 percent right thinking: it is 100 percent wrong thinking. And contrary to lots of opinion, women have no exclusive franchise on gossip. Every day many men, too, live in a partially poisoned environment.

David. J. Schwartz

Source: The Magic of Thinking Big

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Charles Lamb on art, guilt, heart, and love

I know not, I ask not, if guilt 's in that heart, I but know that I love thee whatever thou art.

Charles Lamb (1775 - 1834)

Source: Come, rest in this Bosom.

Contributed by: Zaady

Syndicate content