education

A Quote by Kristina Piper on education and life

Education is the most important thing next to eating, drinking, and breathing...don't let it go to waist.

Kristina Piper

Contributed by: Kristina

A Quote by Norma Piper on friends, life, and education

Your friends will come and go, but your education stays with you.

Norma Piper

Contributed by: Kristina

A Quote by unknown on life and education

I live, therefore I learn.

unknown

Contributed by: Vyctoria

A Quote by David Forbes on education, information, and competition

The purpose of education is not the accumulation of information in order to compete for success.  Education is the experience of being fully present to oneself and the world; it is transformation toward wholeness.

David Forbes

Source: Boyz 2 Buddhas: Counseling Urban High School Male Athletes in the Zone (Counterpoints: Studies in the Postmodern Theory of Education), Pages: 202

Contributed by: Phaedrus

A Quote by Kenneth Smith on philosophy, education, teaching, students, and passion

There is a form of poetic and esthetic and moral genius necessary to make philosophical issues truly incandesce for students, and even though I indeed had some world-class professors myself when I went through the curriculum, I rarely saw such gnosic or concretist/poetic passion among them.  I am not speaking of broad histrionics or melodramatic delivery, but rather a moral investment of concern, of loving delight and pathos in exposing one's consciousness to the full horrific and magnificent implications of the materials.

Kenneth Smith

Contributed by: Dave

A Quote by Kenneth Smith on philosophy, intellect, noesis, gnosis, academia, and education

The approach of intellect or noesis will forever be an effete and limited sort of thing by contrast with the vigor and color of gnosis; but in academia there is virtually nothing but noetic minds to be found, and the very idea of gnosis is alien and untranslatable, not to mention discreditable.

Kenneth Smith

Contributed by: Dave

A Quote by Kenneth Smith on philosophy, education, academia, intellect, and intelligence

One can hardly appreciate how academia has perverted its highest tasks and "ideals" without pondering long and hard the implications of Jacques Barzun's House of Intellect and its Hegelian/Bergsonian contrast between rigidified "intellect" and always-growing "intelligence."  This fundamentally Hegelian distinction, needless to say, cuts to the quick of the contrast between Platonic and Aristotelian forms of philosophy.

Kenneth Smith

Contributed by: Dave

A Quote by Kenneth Smith on philosophy, mastery, belief, education, teaching, and students

It is not enough to say that a philosophy teacher presents students with counterpoint to their customary ways of seeing things.  A teacher in philosophy is not necessarily very profoundly philosophical for that reason, nor need he or she be.  The teacher may be only a few leagues ahead of the students, and may frequently find that a superbright student will tax his or her supposed mastery of the issues.  To be honest about these relations and difficulties, I have always assumed that as a professor I was no more than an exemplary student, and "mastery" was merely a way of gaining momentum, not declaring the race was over.  Self-mastery in philosophy is how one orchestrates the energies to be able to dislodge really prodigious monolithic belief-systems.  It is by no means any kind of self-congratulation. 

Kenneth Smith

Contributed by: Dave

A Quote by Kenneth Smith on philosophy, education, energy, spirit, and appearance

Education in philosophy is energy speaking to energy, a higher perspective of spirit that is trying to awaken its next natural generation to something beyond the stupid appearances of things.

Kenneth Smith

Contributed by: Dave

A Quote by Kenneth Smith on philosophy, students, suffering, thinking, clarity, teaching, ideas, freedom, sympathy, education, and conviction

Because of the very intimate character of philosophical norms and criticisms, a teacher in philosophy has to be like Alexander the Great:  never issuing dictates as to what his soldiers ought to do that he was not ready and willing to leap into doing himself.  An excellent teacher is one accomplished in serving as an exemplar, every act of every kind of thinking and every form of perspective must be something he is prepared to illustrate by carrying out himself.  Students need to see the incandescent arc-welding that joins ideas together into thoughts.  If one is saying something that inflicts suffering, one by all rights had better be prepared to suffer along with the student, to sympathize and assure them that the profit for this agony consists in freedom and clarity. 

Kenneth Smith

Contributed by: Dave

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