earth

A Quote by Micheal Teal on angel, soul, spirit, life, experience, beauty, guides, earth, world, and change

To connect with the angels we must trust our inner voice. Have a talk with your spirit guides, experience the extraordinary and embrace the beauty within for doing so will enable you to live the life you want to live. We are all Earth Angels and our souls are the place where heaven and earth meet. By knowing yourself you change the world for the better and live your higher self. Be love and you connect with the angels.

Micheal Teal

Source: Micheal Teal - Poet, Philosopher and Shaman

Contributed by: oldman

A Quote by Sir Isaac Newton on nature, circulatory, atmosphere, earth, sun, conserve, river, spirit, light, and ether

For nature is a perpetual circulatory worker, generating fluids out of solids, and solids out of fluids, fixed things out of volatile, & volatile out of fixed, subtle out of gross, & gross out of subtle, Some things to ascend & make the upper terrestrial juices, Rivers and the Atmosphere; & by consequence others to descend for a Requital to the former. And as the Earth, so perhaps may the Sun imbibe this spirit copiously to conserve his Shining, & keep the Planets from receding further from him. And they that will, may also suppose, that this Spirit affords or carries with it thither the solary fuel & material Principle of Light; And that the vast ethereal Spaces between us, & the stars are for a sufficient repository for this food of the Sun and Planets. 

Sir Isaac Newton (1642 - 1727)

Source: Letter to Oldenburg (7 Dec 1675). In H. W. Turnbull (ed.), The Correspondence of Isaac Newton, 1661-1675 (1959), Vol. 1, 366.

Contributed by: Meenakshi

A Quote by Gunvor Hofmo on earth, time, and winter

Now the Earth's face is lathered
white with shaving soap
It's a long time till
the razor once more makes its face
smooth and fresh and green.

Gunvor Hofmo

Source: Winter

Contributed by: ingebrita

A Quote by Kolbein Falkeid on blue, earth, eternity, life, light, sea, solitude, soul, and stars

Like the prodigal son
I return to you, the sea.
You who scare the idylls off
into tame inner fjords, bays and inlets
because you are much too majestic for weekend yachtsmen,
outboard motors and hobby anglers.
Without so much as a blink you swallow the sun
like a raw egg-yolk for supper
and at daybreak you lift heavy banks of cloud
dense with rain and squalls, a wet cloth
on sleep-heavy eyes and throbbing temples.
With the horizon like a diadem about your brows
you write your salt letters to the shore.
Land changes,
men and beasts come and go.
Only you
live your solitary life, the world's
blue eyes fixed on the stars and eternity.

If the Earth has a soul,
it swims in you.

Kolbein Falkeid

Source: Homecoming to the Sea

Contributed by: ingebrita

A Quote by Knut Hamsun on earth, light, nature, people, and sea

Earth and sea merged, the sea tossed itself in the air
in a fantastic dance, into the shapes of men
and horses and tattered banners.
I stood in the lee of an overhanging rock
and thought of many things.

Knut Hamsun

Source: The Nordic Light

Contributed by: ingebrita

A Quote by Ruy Belo on write, earth, return, and destroy

 When I write I give to the earth, which for me is everything, a little of what belongs to the earth. In that sense, writing for me is to die a little, to anticipate a definitive return to the earth. I write the way I live, the way I love, destroying myself. I commit suicide in words.

Ruy Belo

Contributed by: Meenakshi

A Quote by Jónas Hallgrímsson on earth, laws, intelligence, time, space, solar system, and mother

Ancient poets and sages have called the earth the mother of all things. They could hardly have chosen a more attractive name, or one that was more appropriate. From her lap springs everything that possesses life and motion, everything that flourishes, fades, and has its fated day, and she tirelessly provides material for the countless varied bodies that are created --- and then abandoned --- by the life force in its unending, hidden progress through nature. And meanwhile the earth itself is running its race around the sun with incredible speed, obedient to fixed, immutable laws. Human intelligence has succeeded in understanding these laws, and it is now possible to determine earth's position in time and space, relative to the sun and other heavenly bodies, at any point in the future, just so long as the present frame of our solar system is not disturbed by any unusual, large-scale events.

Jónas Hallgrímsson

Source: On the Nature and Origin of the Earth

Contributed by: Meenakshi

A Quote by Jónas Hallgrímsson on lafur the white poet, prose edda, earth, living, ancient, powerful, animated, and alive

On the other hand Ólafur the White Poet --- or whoever he was, the Icelander who wrote the Preface to the Prose Edda --- describes the beliefs of our ancestors in such eloquent and powerful terms that I cannot refrain from quoting them exactly as they stand in his book.

"They pondered and wondered what it meant," he says, "that the earth and the animals and birds had certain characteristics in common, though they were very unlike in form. To take one such characteristic: if you dig into the earth at the top of high hills, you come upon water without needing to delve down any farther than you do in low valleys. Similarly with animals and birds: the blood flows at no deeper level in their heads than in their feet.

"It is another characteristic of the earth that every year she produces plants and flowers which decay and die that same year. Similarly, animals and birds grow hair and feathers every year, then shed them.

"It is a third characteristic of the earth that when she is cut open or dug into, grass will grow on the soil that is turned upward. From this --- and from their interpretation of rocks and stones as being like the teeth and bones of animals --- they drew the conclusion that the earth was animated, was somehow alive, and they realized that she was incredibly ancient in terms of years and quintessentially powerful: she gave birth to all living things and reclaimed everything that died. Therefore they gave her a name and traced their origin to her."

 

Although we know today that the earth is not a living being in the sense that plants or animals are, and that her various parts are not interdependent (as are the muscular and circulatory systems of animals, or the roots and leaves of grasses and flowers), nevertheless the speculations of this ancient sage are so pleasing and vivid that no one should really make fun of them. In his day men had no inkling of the timeless forces that operate to regulate the motion of the heavenly bodies, and though they were actively engaged in mining metals from the depths of the earth, it had not occurred to anyone to investigate the various geological strata lying one on top of the other, or to distinguish between streams of water (whose movement obeys the law of gravity) and the blood of animals and sap of trees (whose flow is regulated by other laws).

Jónas Hallgrímsson

Source: On the Nature and Origin of the Earth. http://www.library.wisc.edu/etext/Jonas/Edli/Edli.html

Contributed by: Meenakshi

A Quote by J. E. Lovelock on gaia, earth, living system, and planet

There is nothing unusual in the idea of life on Earth interacting with the air, sea and rocks, but it took a view from outside to glimpse the possibility that this combination might consist of a single giant living system and one with the capacity to keep the Earth always at a state most favorable for the life upon it.

An entity comprising a whole planet and with a powerful capacity to regulate the climate needs a name to match. It was the novelist William Golding who proposed the name Gaia. Gladly we accepted his suggestion and Gaia is also the name of the hypothesis of science which postulates that the climate and the composition of the Earth always are close to an optimum for whatever life inhabits it.

James Lovelock

Source: What is Gaia?

Contributed by: Meenakshi

A Quote by J. E. Lovelock on gaia, william golding, goddess, chaos, earth, system, and regulate

May I remind you why I call the Earth Gaia? It came about in the 1960s when the author William Golding, who subsequently won the Nobel and many other prizes, was near neighbor and friend. We both lived in the village of Bowerchalke, twelve miles southwest of Salisbury in southern England. We would often talk on scientific topics on walks around the village or in the village pub, the Bell Inn. In 1968 or 1969, during a walk, I tried out my hypothesis on him; he was receptive because, unlike most literary figures, he had taken physics while at Oxford as an undergraduate and fully understood the science of my argument. He grew enthusiastic and said, "If you are intending to come out with a large idea like that, I suggest that you give it a proper name: I propose 'Gaia.'" I was pleased with his suggestion - it was a word, not an acronym, and even then I saw the Earth as in certain ways alive, at least to the extent that it appeared to regulate its own climate and chemistry. Few scientists are familiar with the classics, and are unaware that Gaia is sometimes given the alternate name 'Ge.' Ge, of course, is the prefix of the sciences of geology, geophysics and geochemistry. To Golding, Gaia, the goddess who brought order out of chaos, was the appropriate title for a hypothesis about an Earth system that regulate its climate and chemistry so as to sustain habitability.

James Lovelock

Source: The Vanishing Face of Gaia - A Final Warning

Contributed by: Meenakshi

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