discovery

A Quote by Samuel Smiles on discovery, failure, learning, mistakes, success, and wisdom

We learn wisdom from failure much more than from success. We often discover what will do by finding out what will not do; and probably he who never made a mistake never made a discovery.

Samuel Smiles (1812 - 1904)

Source: Self-Help.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Samuel Smiles on difficulty, discovery, inventions, and sorrow

The very greatest things - great thoughts, discoveries, inventions - have usually been nurtured in hardship, often pondered over in sorrow, and at length established with difficulty.

Samuel Smiles (1812 - 1904)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Samuel Eliot Morison on america, day, delay, discovery, independence, and war

If the European discovery had been delayed for a century or two, it is possible that the Aztec in Mexico or the Iroquois in North America would have established strong native states capable of adopting European war tactics and maintaining their independence to this day, as Japan kept her independence from China.

Samuel Eliot Morison (1887 - 1976)

Source: The Oxford History of the American People, 1965, ch. 1

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Samuel Eliot Morison on america, discovery, exploring, history, hope, and world

America was discovered accidentally by a great seaman who was looking for something else; when discovered it was not wanted; and most of the exploration for the next fifty years was done in the hope of getting through or around it. America was named after a man who discovered no part of the New World. History is like that, very chancy.

Samuel Eliot Morison (1887 - 1976)

Source: The Oxford History of the American People, 1965, ch. 2

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Russell Baker on discovery, inventions, and television

Television was the most revolutionary event of the century. Its importance was in a class with the discovery of gunpowder and the invention of the printing press, which changed the human condition for centuries afterward.

Russell Baker

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Rufus M. J ones on discovery, fear, and serenity

Serenity comes not alone by removing the outward causes and occasions of fear, but by the discovery of inward reservoirs to draw upon.

Rufus M. J ones

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Robert Chase on action, cruelty, discovery, judgment, nationality, needs, people, world, and writing

I have discovered that this world is harsh, cruel and nasty enough without writing off entire classes of individuals on the basis of their colour or national origin. There are enough people in the world who can be judged on the basis of their actions that we don't need to judge others merely on the basis of their colour or nationality.

Robert Chase

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Richard Berendzen on belief, discovery, diversity, earth, and separation

I would like to believe that the discovery of even a single fossil bacteria on Mars would teach us what we ought to know all along, and that is what binds us here on earth - all the diverse peoples here - is really much more profound than what seems to separate us.

Richard Berendzen

Source: 6-Aug-96

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Richard David Bach on adventure, beginning, discovery, husbands, marriage, unhappiness, and wives

If we must lose wife or husband when we live to our highest right, we lose an unhappy marriage as well, and we gain ourselves. But if a marriage is born between two already self-discovered, what a lovely adventure begins, hurricanes and all!

Richard Bach (1936 -)

Source: Running

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by René Descartes on difficulty, discovery, knowledge, order, and simplicity

These long chains of perfectly simple and easy reasonings by means of which geometers are accustomed to carry out their most difficult demonstrations had led me to fancy that everything that can fall under human knowledge forms a similar sequence; and that so long as we avoid accepting as true what is not so, and always preserve the right order of deduction of one thing from another, there can be nothing too remote to be reached in the end, or to well hidden to be discovered.

René Descartes (1596 - 1650)

Source: Discours de la Méthode. 1637.

Contributed by: Zaady

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