departure

A Quote by Lucius Annaeus Seneca on death, departure, justice, and life

Just as I shall select my ship when I am about to go on a voyage, or my house when I propose to take a residence, so I shall choose my death when I am about to depart from life.

Seneca (4 BC - 65 AD)

Source: Epistulae ad Lucilium, epistle 70

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Saint Clement of Alexandria on acceptance, age, beginning, belief, brothers, certainty, character, christ, church, cities, companions, cooperation, corruption, crime, death, departure, divinity, elderly, evil, familiarity, fatherhood, fear, fo

An apocryphal story from the writings of Clement of Alexandria regarding John the Apostle quoted by John H. Vandenberg, Conference Report, October 1963, p.45 - p.46: ". . . about John the Apostle, handed down and preserved in memory. When, on the death of the tyrant, he (John) passed over to Ephesus from the Island of Patmos, he used to make missionary journeys also to neighboring gentile cities, in some places to appoint bishops, and in some to set in order whole churches and . . . to appoint one of those indicated by the Spirit. On his arrival then at one of the cities at no great distance, of which some even mention the name, . . . he saw a youth of stalwart frame and winning countenance, and impetuous spirit, and said to the bishop, 'I entrust to thee this youth with all earnestness, calling Christ and the Church to witness.' The bishop accepted the trust, and made all the requisite promises, and the apostle renewed his injunction and adjuration. He then returned to Ephesus, and the elder taking home with him the youth who had been entrusted to his care, maintained, cherished, and finally baptized him. After this he abandoned further care and protection of him, considering that he had affixed to him the seal of the Lord as a perfect amulet against evil. Thus prematurely neglected, the youth was corrupted by certain idle companions of his own age, who were familiar with evil, and who first led him astray by many costly banquets, and then took him out by night with them to share in their felonious proceedings, finally demanding his cooperation in some worse crime. First familiarized with guilt, and then, from the force of his character, starting aside from the straight path like some mighty steed that seizes the bit between its teeth; he rushed towards headlong ruin, and utterly abandoning the divine salvation, gathered his worst comrades around him, and became a most violent, bloodstained, and reckless bandit-chief. Not long afterwards John was recalled to the city, and after putting other things in order said, 'Come now, O bishop, restore to me the deposit which I and the Saviour entrusted to thee, with the witness of the Church over which thou dost preside.' At first the bishop in his alarm mistook the meaning of the metaphor, but the apostle said, 'I demand back the young man and the soul of the brother.' Then groaning from the depth of his heart and shedding tears, 'He is dead,' said the bishop. 'How and by what death?' 'He is dead to God! For he has turned out wicked and desperate, and, to sum up all, a brigand; and now, instead of the Church he has seized the mountain, with followers like himself.' Then the apostle, rending his robe and beating his head, with loud wailing said, 'A fine guardian of our brother's soul did I leave! Give me a horse and a guide.' Instantly, . . . he rode away . . . from the Church and arriving at the brigands' outposts, was captured without flight or resistance, but crying, 'For this I have come. Lead me to your chief.' The chief awaited him in his armour, but when he recognized John as he approached, he was struck with shame and turned to fly [flight]. But John pursued him as fast as he could, forgetful of his age, crying out, 'Why my son, dost thou fly [flee] from thine own father, unarmed, aged as he is? Pity me, . . . fear not . . . stay! believe! Christ sent me.' But he on hearing these words first stood with downcast gaze, then flung away his arms, then trembling, began to weep bitterly, and embraced the old man when he came up to him, pleading with his groans, . . . but the apostle pledging himself . . . led him back to the Church and praying for him . . . and wrestling with him in earnest fastings . . . did not depart, as they say, till he restored him to the bosom of the Church."

Saint Clement of Alexandria (c.150 - c.220)

Source: St. Clement of Alexandria, Quis Divinitus Salv., chapter 42.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Russell M. Nelson on children, departure, god, innocence, men, practice, punishment, and women

Abortion sheds that innocent blood. Now, as a servant of the Lord, I dutifully warn those who advocate and practice abortion that they incur the wrath of Almighty God, who declared, "If men... hurt a woman with child, so that her fruit depart from her . . . he shall be surely punished."

Russell M. Nelson (1924 -)

Source: Ensign, May 1985; Exodus 21:22, © by Intellectual Reserve, Inc.Used by permission.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Rudyard Kipling on departure, heart, humility, and sacrifice

The tumult and the shouting dies; The captains and the kings depart- Still stands Thine ancient Sacrifice, An humble and a contrite heart.

Rudyard Kipling (1865 - 1936)

Source: Recessional from The Five Nations

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Robert Scheid on action, departure, feeling, soul, and thought

Our hearts and souls are always the departing point for all thought, feeling and action.

Robert Scheid

Source: Beyond the Love Game

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Rey L. Pratt on darkness, death, deception, departure, despair, doubt, divinity, eternity, faith, fatherhood, forgiveness, god, guidance, happiness, heart, heaven, home, jesus, justice, kiss, knowledge, life, love, men, mortality, prayer, puri

A Prayer: 1. 3. O Father, help me understand, Forgive the surging doubts that rise And know the reason why Within my aching heart, The boy that Thou dids't give to me, And take the dimness from mine eyes, So early had to die; Let darkness all depart. Why one whose life had been so pure, Let light and knowledge come to me Who never knew deceit, From heaven, Thy home on high, Should droop and wither like a flower O help me put my trust in Thee: Crushed under ruthless feet. O Father, tell me, why. 2. 4. O Father, help me understand Perhaps I sin in asking this, Thy purposes Divine, More faith should show in Thee; In letting death, with ruthless hand But, O I miss his loving kiss, Tear his dear heart from mine. He was so dear to me. O let me see the veil beyond, Just let me know that I sometime Where dwells his spirit pure, Shall find him, once again, And know he's happy where he's gone; And clasp again his form to mine: O let me feel secure. I ask, in Jesus' name. The Answer: 5. 7. Grieve not, my son for time shall be, Then grieve not for the one that's gone, When death shall be no more. Nor let your heart despair; Thy loved one I'll return to thee, For God in wisdom called your son, To cherish evermore. To work for Him up there; 'Twas in the plan that man should die, The prison gates to open wide And slumber in the grave, For those who died in sin, But rise again, as even I, And through repentance them to guide For this my life I gave. Again to worship Him. 6. 8. For mortal life is but a part Let this then be your answer, why, Of God's eternity, And let your heart rejoice, In which the souls of men embark For unto God they do not die, To find felicity. Who answer to His voice; What men call death is but a step But walk with Him in realms of love, From low to higher plane, Where all the righteous be. And all who in the dust have slept, Be comforted, for there above, Through me shall live again. Thy boy will welcome thee.

Rey L. Pratt

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Peter F. Drucker on adaptability, change, departure, familiarity, survival, and value

During periods of discontinuous, abrupt change, the essence of adaptation involves a keen sensitivity to what should be abandoned - not what should be changed or introduced. A willingness to depart from the familiar has distinct survival value.

Peter F. Drucker (1909 - 2005)

Source: Age of Discontinuity

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Pablo Ruiz Picasso on departure, ideas, and thought

An idea is a point of departure and no more. As soon as you elaborate it, it becomes transformed by thought.

Pablo Picasso (1881 - 1973)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Neal A. Maxwell on certainty, departure, duty, effort, god, history, joy, mind, past, perspective, reality, richness, soul, understanding, and universe

These transcending truths restructure our understanding of ourselves and of the universe and bring within our view resplendent reality. To be seen only by those who have eyes to see, these flakes of fire are embedded in the holy scriptures. There these transcending truths may appear in the midst of the routine lineage history . . . chronologies, genealogies, and duties. . . . When encountered, their sudden richness is so breathtaking and light-intensive that, like radioactive materials, they must be handled with great care. They both light up the mind and infuse joy into the soul. . . . encountering certain verses is like walking in the woods and coming suddenly upon what C. S. Lewis called a patch of "god light" - an illuminated place in the woods of our experiences. Then there is a special surge of gospel gladness. The weariness of mind quickly departs. Such sudden light can even restructure our understanding of reality and put our past, puny efforts in perspective. One wonders, for instance, if [this is] what Moses called things he "never had supposed." (Moses 1:10.)

Neal Maxwell (1926 -)

Source: Meek and Lowly, p.46 - p.47, © by Intellectual Reserve, Inc. Used by permission.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Mevlana Jelalu'ddin Rumi on departure, forgiveness, lovers, people, soul, time, work, and world

Lovers O lovers, lovers it is time to set out from the world. I hear a drum in my soul's ear coming from the depths of the stars. Our camel driver is at work; the caravan is being readied. He asks that we forgive him for the disturbance he has caused us, He asks why we travellers are asleep. Everywhere the murmur of departure; the stars, like candles thrust at us from behind blue veils, and as if to make the invisible plain, a wondrous people have come forth.

Mevlana Rumi (1207 - 1273)

Contributed by: Zaady

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