day

A Quote by Les Brown on day, goals, and order

Review your goals twice every day in order to be focused on achieving them.

Les Brown

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Les Brown on day, goals, idealism, and practicality

Goals are not dreamy, pie-in-the-sky ideals. They have every day practical applications and they should be practical.

Les Brown

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Anthony (Tony) Robbins on change, day, decisions, dreams, learning, life, needs, power, and reality

I've continued to recognize the power individuals have to change virtually anything and everything in their lives in an instant. I've learned that the resources we need to turn our dreams into reality are within us, merely waiting for the day when we decide to wake up and claim our birthright.

Tony Robbins (1960 -)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Zenna Schaffer on day and food

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Give a man a fish and he has food for a day; teach him how to fish and you can get rid of him of the entire weekend.

Zenna Schaffer

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Woodrow Wilson on day, death, dreams, hope, and men

We grow great by dreams. All big men are dreamers. They see things in the soft haze of a spring day or in the red fire of a long winter's evening. Some of us let these great dreams die, but others nourish and protect them; nurse them through bad days till they bring them to the sunshine and light which comes always to those who sincerely hope that their dreams will come true.

Woodrow Wilson (1856 - 1924)

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A Quote by Sir Winston Leonard Spencer Churchill on day and destruction

To build may have to be the slow and laborious task of years. To destroy can be the thoughtless act of a single day.

Winston Churchill (1874 - 1965)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Winston Leonard Spencer Churchill on argument, certainty, conviction, day, discovery, doubt, education, existence, facts, friendship, hell, independence, machines, mathematics, military, persistence, play, purity, purpose, reality, reason,

Some of my cousins who had the great advantage of University education used to tease me with arguments to prove that nothing has any existence except what we think of it. . . . These amusing mental acrobatics are all right to play with. They are perfectly harmless and perfectly useless. . . . I always rested on the following argument. . . We look up to the sky and see the sun. Our eyes are dazzled and our senses record the fact. So here is this great sun standing apparently on no better foundation than our physical senses. But happily there is a method, apart altogether from our physical senses, of testing the reality of the sun. It is by mathematics. By means of prolonged processes of mathematics, entirely separate from the senses, astronomers are able to calculate when an eclipse will occur. They predict by pure reason that a black spot will pass across the sun on a certain day. You go and look, and your sense of sight immediately tells you that their calculations are vindicated. So here you have the evidence of the senses reinforced by the entirely separate evidence of a vast independent process of mathematical reasoning. We have taken what is called in military map-making "a cross bearing." . . . When my metaphysical friends tell me that the data on which the astronomers made their calculations, were necessarily obtained originally through the evidence of the senses, I say, "no." They might, in theory at any rate, be obtained by automatic calculating-machines set in motion by the light falling upon them without admixture of the human senses at any stage. When it is persisted that we should have to be told about the calculations and use our ears for that purpose, I reply that the mathematical process has a reality and virtue in itself, and that once discovered it constitutes a new and independent factor. I am also at this point accustomed to reaffirm with emphasis my conviction that the sun is real, and also that it is hot - in fact hot as Hell, and that if the metaphysicians doubt it they should go there and see.

Winston Churchill (1874 - 1965)

Source: Winston S. Churchill, My Early Life, Fontana, London, 1972, pp 123-124.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Winston Leonard Spencer Churchill on day

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Everyone has his day and some days last longer than others.

Winston Churchill (1874 - 1965)

Source: Speech in the House of Commons, January 1952

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Wordsworth on day

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Oh for a single hour of that Dundee Who on that day the word of onset gave!

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Source: Sonnet, in the Pass of Killicranky.

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A Quote by William Wordsworth on beginning, birth, children, day, death, dreams, earth, fatherhood, glory, god, heart, heaven, home, joy, lies, life, nature, past, perception, sleep, soul, time, travel, vision, wishes, and youth

"My heart leaps up when I behold A rainbow in the sky: So it was when my life began; So it is now I am a man; So be it when I shall grow old, Or let me die! The Child is Father of the Man; And I could wish my days to be Bound each to each by natural piety." There was a time when meadow, grove, and stream, The earth, and every common sight, To me did seem Apparelled in celestial light, The glory and the freshness of a dream, It is not now as it hath been of yore ;- Turn whereso'er I may, By night or day, The things which I have seen I now can see no more. . . . . But yet I know, where'er I go, That there hath past away a glory from the earth. . . . . Our birth is but a sleep and a forgetting; The Soul that rises with us, our life's Star, Hath had elsewhere its setting, And cometh from afar: Not in entire forgetfulness, And not in utter nakedness, But trailing clouds of glory do we come From God, who is our home: Heaven lies about us in our infancy! Shades of the prison-house begin to close Upon the growing Boy, But He beholds the light, and whence it flows, And sees it in his joy; The Youth, who daily farther from the east Must travel, still is Nature's Priest, And by the vision splendid Is on his way attended; At length the Man perceives it die away, And fade into the light of common day.

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Source: “Ode: Intimations of Immortality from Recollections of Early Childhood”

Contributed by: Zaady

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