conversation

A Quote by Marquise Magdeleine de Sablé on certainty, conversation, and listening

There is a certain manner of self-absorption in speaking that always renders the speaker disagreeable. For it is as great a folly to listen only to ourselves while we are carrying on a conversation with others as it is to talk to ourselves while we are alone.

Magdeleine Sable (c. 1599 - 1678)

Source: the Marquise Sablé’s work is in Maxims and Various Thoughts (Maximes et pensées diverses) 1678

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Marquise Magdeleine de Sablé on contentment, conversation, giving, listening, people, pleasure, satisfaction, and time

One factor that makes it rare for us to find so few people who can carry on an agreeable and rational conversation is that there are practically no people who do not think first of all about what they want to say, rather than responding precisely to what others are saying to them. The politest people are content merely to show an attentive mien, while all the time we see that their eyes and their minds are wandering, and that they are in a rush to return to what they want to say. They should consider that this insistent search for self-satisfaction is a poor way of giving pleasure, and that it is a greater accomplishment to listen well and reply justly than to speak well and often without responding to what others are saying to us.

Magdeleine Sable (c. 1599 - 1678)

Source: the Marquise Sablé’s work is in Maxims and Various Thoughts (Maximes et pensées diverses) 1678

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Marquise Magdeleine de Sablé on conversation and truth

The conversation of those who like to lord it over us is very disagreeable. But we should always be ready to graciously acknowledge the truth, no matter in what guise it comes to us.

Magdeleine Sable (c. 1599 - 1678)

Source: the Marquise Sablé’s work is in Maxims and Various Thoughts (Maximes et pensées diverses) 1678

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Marquise Magdeleine de Sablé on brevity, business, conversation, excess, faults, good, and words

It is such a great fault to talk too much that, in business and conversation, if what is good is also brief, it is doubly good, and one gains by brevity what one often loses by an excess of words.

Magdeleine Sable (c. 1599 - 1678)

Source: the Marquise Sablé’s work is in Maxims and Various Thoughts (Maximes et pensées diverses) 1678

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Frank McKinney "Kin" Hubbard on change, conversation, people, and weather

Don't knock the weather, nine-tenths of the people couldn't start a conversation if it didn't change once in a while.

Kin Hubbard (1868 - 1930)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Frank McKinney "Kin" Hubbard on change, conversation, people, and weather

Don't knock the weather; nine-tenths of the people couldn't start a conversation if it didn't change once in a while.

Kin Hubbard (1868 - 1930)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Judith Martin on conversation and effort

Let us make a special effort to stop communicating with each other, so we can have some conversation.

Judith Martin (1938 -)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Josiah Quincy on ability, anecdotes, approval, argument, cities, conversation, day, determination, fame, good, journeys, justice, laws, lawyers, libraries, money, preparation, presidency, time, and work

Josiah Quincy, one-time mayor of Boston and president of Harvard University, recalled: "I will repeat an anecdote which I think Daniel Webster gave at a dinner, though, as I made no note of it, it is just possible that he told it in my presence at some later date. The conversation was running upon the importance of doing small things thoroughly and with the full measure of one's ability. This Webster illustrated by an account of some petty insurance case that was brought to him when a young lawyer in Portsmouth. Only a small amount was involved, and a twenty-dollar fee was all that was promised. "He saw that, to do his clients full justice, a journey to Boston, to consult the law library, would be desirable. He would be out of pocket by such an expedition, and for his time he would receive no adequate compensation. After a little hesitation he determined to do his very best, cost cost what it might. He accordingly went to Boston looked up the authorities, and gained the case. "Years after this, Webster, then famous, was passing through New York City. An important insurance case was to be tried the day after his arrival, and one of the counsel had been suddenly taken ill. Money was no object, and Webster was begged to name his terms and conduct the case. " 'I told them,' Mr. Webster, 'that it was preposterous to prepare a legal argument at a few hours' notice. They insisted, however, that I should look at the papers; and this after some demur, I consented to do. Well, it was my old twenty-dollar case over again, and as I never forget anything, I had all the authorities at my fingers' ends. The Court knew that I had no time to prepare, and was astonished at the range of my acquirements. So, you see, I was handsomely paid both in fame and money for that journey to Boston; and the moral is that good work is rewarded in the end, though, to be sure, one's self-approval should be enough.'"

Josiah Quincy (1744 - 1775)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Joseph Addison on action, conversation, ideas, mind, senses, and variety

Our sight is the most perfect and most delightful of all our senses. It fills the mind with the largest variety of ideas, converses with its objects at the greatest distance, and continues the longest in action without being tired or satiated.

Joseph Addison (1672 - 1719)

Source: The Spectator, no. 411.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Joseph Addison on complaints, conversation, ideas, laughter, and life

It is very wonderful to see persons of the best sense passing hours together in shuffling and dividing a pack of cards with no conversation but what is made up of a few game-phrases, and no other ideas but those of black or red spots arranged together in different figures. Would not a man laugh to hear any one of his species complaining that life is short?

Joseph Addison (1672 - 1719)

Contributed by: Zaady

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