control

A Quote by Alan Valentine on achievement, control, discipline, freedom, individuality, liberty, nations, self-control, slavery, and women

Freedom is born of self-discipline. No individual, no nation, can achieve or maintain liberty without self-control. The undisciplined man (or woman) is a slave to his own weaknesses.

Alan Valentine

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Adam Smith on beginning, bureaucracy, control, government, management, and tyranny

As soon as government management begins it upsets the natural equilibrium of industrial relations, and each interference only requires further bureaucratic control until the end is the tyranny of the totalitarian state.

Adam Smith

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A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on consequences, control, dogs, self-control, temper, time, yielding, and path

Quarrel not at all. No man resolved to make the most of himself can spare time for personal contention. Still less can he afford to take all the consequences, including the vitiation of his temper and loss of self-control. Yield larger things to which you can show no more than equal right; and yield lesser ones, though clearly your own. Better give your path to a dog than be bitten by him in contesting for the right. Even killing the dog would not cure the bite.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

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A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on confession and control

I claim not to have controlled events, but confess plainly that events have controlled me.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Source: "Letter to Albert G. Hodges," April 4, 1864

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A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on control, government, laws, principles, prohibition, and reason

Prohibition goes beyond the bounds of reason in that it attempts to control a man's appetite by legislation and makes crimes out of things that are not crimes. A prohibition law strikes a blow at the very principles upon which our government was founded.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

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A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on control and fatherhood

Upon the North gaining control of the Mississippi River: The Father of Waters again goes unvexed to the sea.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

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A Quote by Abraham L. Feinberg on acceptance, body, books, control, cynicism, day, envy, faith, imagination, life, limitations, energy, mind, peace, people, prayer, relaxation, silence, solitude, soul, spirituality, strength, time, trying, and worry

Ten Spiritual Tonics 1. Stop worrying. Worry kills life. 2. Begin each day with a prayer. It will arm your soul. 3. Control appetite. Over-indulgence clogs body and mind. 4. Accept your limitations . . . 5. Don't envy. It wastes time and energy. 6. Have faith in people. Cynicism sours the disposition. 7. Find a hobby. It will relax your nerves. 8. Read a book a week to stimulate imagination and broaden your views. 9. Spend some time alone for the peace of solitude and silence. 10. Try to want what you have, instead of spending your strength trying to get what you want.

Abraham L. Feinberg

Source: notes

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A Quote by Abraham H. Maslow on awareness, certainty, consequences, control, conversation, and world

Become aware of internal, subjective, subverbal experiences, so that these experiences can be brought into the world of abstraction, of conversation, of naming, etc. with the consequence that it immediately becomes possible for a certain amount of control to be exerted over these hitherto unconscious and uncontrollable processes.

Abraham Maslow (1908 - 1970)

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A Quote by A. W. Cass on control

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Loving someone is not about keeping things from them, or protecting them or controlling what they feel, it's about letting them be free.

A. W. Cass

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Drea on action, balance, body, brevity, chess, consequences, control, danger, effort, experience, intelligence, intuition, mistakes, mountains, pain, pleasure, responsibility, risk, silence, skill, world, and worth

The pleasure of risk is in the control needed to ride it with assurance so that what appears dangerous to the outsider is, to the participant, simply a matter of intelligence, skill, intuition, coordination - in a word, experience. Climbing, in particular, is a paradoxically intellectual pastime, but with this difference: you have to think with your body. Every move has to be worked out in terms of effort, balance and consequences. It is like playing chess with your body. If I make a mistake, the consequences are immediate, obvious, embarrassing and possibly painful. For a brief period, I am directly responsible for my actions. In that beautiful, silent world of the mountains, it seems to me worth a little risk.

Drea

Source: New York Times Magazine

Contributed by: Zaady

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