confusion

A Quote by Tallulah Bankhead on acting and confusion

Acting is a form of confusion.

Tallulah Bankhead (1903 - 1968)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Steven Wright on birds, confusion, good, and justice

It's a good thing we have gravity or else when birds died they'd just stay right up there. Hunters would be all confused.

Steven Wright (1955 -)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sogyal Rinpoche on buddhism, confusion, delusion, mind, nature, and spirituality

When you realize the nature of mind, layers of confusion peel away. You don't actually "become" a buddha, you simply cease, slowly, to be deluded. And being a buddha is not being some omnipotent spiritual superman, but becoming at last a true human being.

Sogyal Rinpoche

Source: Sogyal Rinpoche in The Tibetan Book of Living and Dying, HarperCollins Publishers, 1993, p. 53

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Thomas Browne on confusion, enemies, god, hatred, laughter, men, reason, religion, and virtue

If there be any among those common objects of hatred I do contemn and laugh at, it is that great enemy of reason, virtue, and religion, the multitude; that numerous piece of monstrosity, which, taken asunder, seem men, and the reasonable creatures of God, but, confused together, make but one great beast, and a monstrosity more prodigious than Hydra.

Sir Thomas Browne (1605 - 1682)

Source: Religio Medici

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Francis Galton on anarchy, confusion, errors, imagination, laws, order, and serenity

I know of scarcely anything so apt to impress the imagination as the wonderful form of cosmic order expressed by the "Law of Frequency of Error." The law would have been personified by the Greeks and deified, if they had known of it. It reigns with serenity and in complete self-effacement, amidst the wildest confusion. The huger the mob, and the greater the apparent anarchy, the more perfect is its sway. It is the supreme law of Unreason. Whenever a large sample of chaotic elements are taken in hand and marshaled in the order of their magnitude, an unsuspected and most beautiful form of regularity proves to have been latent all along.

Sir Francis Galton (1822 - 1911)

Source: J. R. Newman (ed.) The World of Mathematics, New York: Simon and Schuster, 1956. p. 1482.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Christopher Wren on beauty, confusion, respect, rules, variety, and vices

In things to be seen at once, much variety makes confusion, another vice of beauty. In things that are not seen at once, and have no respect one to another, great variety is commendable, provided this variety transgress not the rules of optics and geometry.

Sir Christopher Wren (1632 - 1723)

Source: W.H. Auden and L. Kronenberger The Viking Book of Aphorisms, New York: Viking Press, 1966.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sherman Finesilver on confusion, fame, greatness, and spirit

Do not confuse notoriety and fame with greatness. . . . For you see, greatness is a measure of one's spirit, not a result of one's rank in human affairs.

Sherman Finesilver

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Saul David Alinsky on action, confusion, experience, fear, and people

The second rule is: Never go outside the experience of your people. When an action is outside the experience of the people, the result is confusion, fear, and retreat.

Saul David Alinsky (1909 - 1972)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Saul David Alinsky on confusion, enemies, experience, and fear

The third rule is: Whenever possible go outside the experience of the enemy. Here you want to cause confusion, fear, and retreat.

Saul David Alinsky (1909 - 1972)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Samuel Adams on anarchy, catholicism, confusion, destruction, good, government, laws, leadership, liberty, life, mankind, mercy, politics, reason, religion, and war

In regard to religion, mutual toleration in the different professions thereof is what all good and candid minds in all ages have ever practiced, and both by precept and example inculcated on mankind . . . The only sects which he (Locke) thinks ought to be and which by all wise laws are excluded from such toleration are those who teach doctrines subversive of the civil government under which they live. The Roman Catholics or Papists are excluded by reason of such doctrines as these: that princes excommunicated may be deposed, and those they call heretics may be destroyed without mercy; besides their recognizing the pope in so absolute a manner, in subversion of government, by introducing as far as possible into the states under whose protection they enjoy life, liberty, and property that solecism in politics, imperium in imperio, leading directly to the worst anarchy and confusion, civil discord, war and bloodshed.

Samuel Adams (1722 - 1803)

Source: The Rights of the Colonists, 1772.

Contributed by: Zaady

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