confession

A Quote by Marcus Tullius Cicero on confession

I am not ashamed to confess I am ignorant of what I do not know.

Cicero (106 - 43 BC)

Source: Confessions of an English Opium-Eater, pt. 1, 1822.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Marcus Tullius Cicero on admiration, beauty, confession, eternity, excellence, mankind, nature, and world

The beauty of the world and the orderly arrangement of everything celestial makes us confess that there is an excellent and eternal nature, which ought to be worshiped and admired by all mankind.

Cicero (106 - 43 BC)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Charles Robert Darwin on confession and correction

To suppose that the eye with all its inimitable contrivances for adjusting the focus to different distances, for admitting different amounts of light, and for the correction of spherical and chromatic aberration, could have been formed by natural selection, seems, I confess, absurd in the highest degree.

Charles Darwin (1809 - 1882)

Source: Charles Darwin, The Origin of Species, John Murray, London, 1859.

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A Quote by Catherine M. Fanshawe on confession, earth, heaven, hell, and rest

'T was whispered in heaven, 't was mutter'd in hell, And echo caught faintly the sound as it fell; On the confines of earth 't was permitted to rest, And the depths of the ocean its presence confess'd.

Catherine M. Fanshawe (1764 - 1834)

Source: Enigma. The letter H.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Blaise Pascal on admiration, competence, and confession

Look somewhere else for someone who can follow you in your researches about numbers. For my part, I confess that they are far beyond me, and I am competent only to admire them.

Blaise Pascal (1623 - 1662)

Source: Written to Fermat, In G. Simmons Calculus Gems, New York: McGraw Hill Inc., 1992.

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A Quote by Bishop Lancelot Andrewes on citizenship, confession, education, faith, friendship, gifts, god, good, grace, honesty, hope, life, nature, parenthood, promises, religion, secrets, sermons, sincerity, teachers, and present

THANKSGIVING O my Lord, my Lord, I thank Thee for that I am, that I am alive, that I am rational: for nurture, preservation, governance: for education, citizenship, religion: for Thy gifts of grace, nature, estate: for redemption, regeneration, instruction: for calling, recalling, further calling manifold: for forbearance, longsuffering, long longsuffering towards me, many times, many years, until now: for all good offices I have received, good speed I have gotten: for any good thing done: for the use of things present, thy promise and my hope touching the fruition of the good things to come: for my parents honest and good, teachers gentle, benefactors always to be had in remembrance, colleagues likeminded, hearers attentive, friends sincere, retainers faithful: for all who have stood me in good stead by their writings, their sermons, conversations, prayers, examples, rebukes, wrongs: for these things and all other, which I wot of, which I wot not of, open and secret, things I remember, things I have forgotten withal, things done to me after my will or yet against my will, I confess to Thee and bless Thee and give thanks unto Thee, and I will confess and bless and give thanks to Thee all the days of my life. What thanks can I render to God again for all the benefits that He hath done unto me?

Bishop Lancelot Andrewes (1555 - 1626)

Source: Manuscript notebook of Private Prayers for personal use, which was published after his death.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Bertrand Arthur William Russell on belief, choice, clarity, confession, decisions, impossibility, inclusion, language, logic, problems, questions, sharing, truth, virtue, work, and writers

It seems clear that there must be some way of defining logic otherwise than in relation to a particular logical language. The fundamental characteristic of logic, obviously, is that which is indicated when we say that logical propositions are true in virtue of their form. The question of demonstrability cannot enter in, since every proposition which, in one system, is deduced from the premises, might, in another system, be itself taken as a premise. If the proposition is complicated, this is inconvenient, but it cannot be impossible. All the propositions that are demonstrable in any admissible logical system must share with the premises the property of being true in virtue of their form; and all propositions which are true in virtue of their form ought to be included in any adequate logic. Some writers, for example Carnap in his "Logical Syntax of Language," treat the whole matter as being more a matter of linguistic choice than I can believe it to be. In the above mentioned work, Carnap has two logical languages, one of which admits the multiplicative axiom and the axiom of infinity, while the other does not. I cannot myself regard such a matter as one to be decided by our arbitrary choice. It seems to me that these axioms either do, or do not, have the characteristic of formal truth which characterises logic, and that in the former event every logic must include them, while in the latter every logic must exclude them. I confess, however, that I am unable to give any clear account of what is meant by saying that a proposition is "true in virtue of its form." But this phrase, inadequate as it is, points, I think, to the problem which must be solved if an adequate definition of logic is to be found.

Bertrand Russell (1872 - 1970)

Source: the Introduction to the second edition of The Principles of Mathematics, Russell

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A Quote by Benjamin Franklin on confession, errors, and faults

None but the well-bred man knows how to confess a fault, or acknowledge himself in an error.

Benjamin Franklin (1706 - 1790)

Source: Poor Richard’s Almanac, 1738

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A Quote by Ambrose Gwinett Bierce on confession, conscience, motives, and women

POCKET, n. The cradle of motive and the grave of conscience. In woman this organ is lacking; so she acts without motive, and her conscience, denied burial, remains ever alive, confessing the sins of others.

Ambrose Bierce (1842 - 1914)

Source: The Devil's Dictionary by Ambrose Bierce

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A Quote by Ambrose Gwinett Bierce on confession, duty, faults, love, and truth

ACKNOWLEDGE, v.t. To confess. Acknowledgment of one another's faults is the highest duty imposed by our love of truth.

Ambrose Bierce (1842 - 1914)

Source: The Devil's Dictionary by Ambrose Bierce

Contributed by: Zaady

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