complexity

A Quote by Florence R. Krall on opinions, relationships, understanding, communication, love, friends, complexity, critical, viewpoint, and silence

When we try to explain the complexity of what we see to others who demand that things be laid out in straight paths, they often become resistent and critical... when our viewpoint repeatedly falls on deaf ears, we become silent - avoid confrontation. One source of human suffering arises when our words and actions are perceived, by those we serve or love, in a light of being different from that intended.

Florence R. Krall

Source: unknown

Contributed by: Peggy J

A Quote by Sol Luckman on literature, beginners luke, sol luckman, critics, immortality, organic, experience, complexity, transcendence, mundane origins, alchemy, alchemist, gold, base metals, and transmutation

Literature, at its best, and despite the recent attempts of critics, can never be murdered and dissected, as it’s an immortal yet organic thing, drawing on the richness and complexity of Experience yet somehow managing to transcend its mundane origins like an alchemist transmuting base metals.

Sol Luckman

Source: Beginner's Luke: Book I of the Beginner's Luke Series, Pages: 9

Contributed by: Alyce

A Quote by James Hillman on character, nature, complexity, theory of character, tragedy, and farce

Character is characters; our nature is a plural complexity, a multiphasic polysemous weave, a bundle, a tangle, a sleeve. […]

I like to imagine a person’s psyche to be like a boardinghouse full of characters. The ones who show up regularly and who habitually follow the house rules may not have met other long-term residents who stay behind closed doors, or who only appear at night. An adequate theory of character must make room for character actors, for the stuntmen and animal handlers, for all the figures who play bit parts and produce unexpected acts. They often make the show fateful, or tragic, or farcically absurd.

James Hillman

Source: The Force of Character: And the Lasting Life, Pages: 32

Contributed by: Mushin

A Quote by Daniel Pinchbeck on art, techne, technique, technology, process, martin heidegger, arts saving power, technological enframing, deeper collective vision, world as art, sri nisargadatta maharaj, terrence mckenna, gadgetry, shift in perspective,

“(Martin) Heidegger notes that the origin of the word “technology” comes from the Greek word techne, and this word was applied not only to technology, but to art, and artistic technique as well.  'Once there was a time when the bringing-forth of the true into the beautiful was also called techne.'  He found this to be a numinous correspondence, and considered that, in art, the 'saving power' capable of confronting the abyss of the technological enframing might be found.

If art contains a saving power, it is not in the atomized artworks produced by individual subjects, but in a deeper collective vision that sees the world as a work of art, one that is already, as (Sri) Nisargadatta (Maharaj) and (Terrence) McKenna suggest, perfect in its 'satisfying all-at-onceness'.'  Instead of envisioning an ultimately boring 'technological singularity,' we might be better served by considering an evolution of technique, of skillful means, aimed at this world, as it is now.  Technology might find its proper place in our lives if we experienced such a shift in perspective–in a society oriented around technique, we might find that we desired far less gadgetry.  We might start to prefer slowness to speed, subtlety and complexity to products aimed at standardized mind.  Rather than projecting the spiritual quest and the search for the good life onto futuristic A.I.s,  we could actually take the time to fulfill those goals, here and now, in the present company of our friends and lovers.

Part of the problem seems embedded in the basic concept of a concrescence or singularity, which compacts our possibilities rather than expands them.  The notion of a technological singularity reflects our culture's obsessive rationality, reducing qualitative aspects of being to quantifiable factors, and imposing abstract systems over complex variables.  Instead of a technological singularity, we might reorient our thinking toward a more desirable multiplicity of technique.  Technique is erotic in essence; it is what Glenn Gould or Thelonious Monk expresses through the piano–the interplay between learned skill and quantum improvisation that is the stuff of genius.  Technique embraces the now-ness of our living world; technology throws us into endless insatiation.”

Daniel Pinchbeck

Source: 2012: The Return of Quetzalcoatl, Pages: 106-107

Contributed by: Darshan

A Quote by H. L. Mencken on human, problem, solution, simplicity, complexity, and fundamentalism

For every human problem, there is a solution that is simple, neat, and
wrong.

H.L. Mencken (1880 - 1956)

Contributed by: communeist

A Quote by Mitch on romance, equal, work, complexity, and relationship

In romance, you at least hope that you can operate on an equal basis. But at work, someone is almost always above or below the other person and this can add layers of complexity that a relationship simply does not need.

Mitch Thrower

Source: "The Attention Deficit Workplace" by Mitch Thrower

Contributed by: Mitch

A Quote by Robert Fulghum on work, life, complexity, and simplicity

Doing a straight-forward, clear-cut task that has a beginning and an end balances out the complexity-without-end that often vexes the rest of my life. Sacred simplicity.

Robert Fulghum (1937 -)

Source: ALL I REALLY NEED TO KNOW I LEARNED IN KINDERGARDEN, Pages: 50

Contributed by: Grace

A Quote by Ted Nelson on complexity, inter-being, and emptiness

Intertwingularity is not generally acknowledged - people keep pretending they can make things deeply hierarchical, categorizable and sequential when they can't. Everything is deeply intertwingled.

Ted Nelson

Source: http://www.jefallbright.net/quotes?from=225

Contributed by: Ryan

A Quote by Malcolm Gladwell on group, social, and complexity

Humans socialize in the largest groups of all primates because we are the only animals with brains large enough to handle the complexities of that social arrangement.

Malcolm Gladwell

Source: The Tipping Point: How Little Things Can Make a Big Difference, Pages: 179

Contributed by: ~C4Chaos

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