cities

A Quote by Neal A. Maxwell on cities, emotion, god, impulses, proverbs, resentment, and selfishness

Submissiveness to God enables us to govern ourselves. . . . Lacking this capacity we vulnerable, like "a city which is broken down, and without walls" (Proverbs 25:28). We are vulnerable if we can be taken by a wave of emotion, invaded by an invidious impulse, roughed up by resentment, or engulfed by a surge of selfishness.

Neal Maxwell (1926 -)

Source: Not My Will, But Thine, page 95, © by Intellectual Reserve, Inc. Used by permission.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Neal A. Maxwell on admiration, ancestry, belief, challenge, church, cities, day, duty, faith, humility, kiss, posterity, praise, spirituality, tears, present, and time

Therefore, though we have rightly applauded our ancestors for their spiritual achievements (and do not and must not discount them now), those of us who prevail today will have done no small thing. The special spirits who have been reserved to live in this time of challenges and who overcome will one day be praised for their stamina by those who pulled handcarts. Those who were righteous in other ages, when the gospel light was snuffed out, will one day commend the current members of the Church who so live that the gospel light increased in its incandescence. Those of ancient Israel who saw many signs and yet episodically relapsed will one day praise those in this dispensation who have believed "because of the word" without being compelled to be humble. (Alma 32:14.) The Lamanites who were righteous in earlier times, especially, will praise their present posterity whose righteousness is bringing a blossoming of their seed. Thus the contemporary righteous will earn the esteem of their admired predecessors. Finally, if we are faithful, even the righteous of the city of Enoch will fall upon our necks and kiss us, and we will mingle our tears with their tears! (Moses 7:63.) Let us, therefore, notwithstanding our weaknesses, be reassured that the everyday keeping of the commandments and the doing of our duties is what it is all about.

Neal Maxwell (1926 -)

Source: Notwithstanding My Weakness, p. 18., © by Intellectual Reserve, Inc. Used by permission.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by N. Eldon Tanner on absence, admiration, anger, blessings, character, cities, control, desires, determination, difficulty, discipline, eternity, failure, fatherhood, good, justice, laws, leadership, meaning, pity, proverbs, quotations, self-con

"Success Is Gauged By Self-Mastery" I should like to say a few words about self-discipline, self-control, or self-mastery which is so important to all of us if we are to accomplish what we set out to do and enjoy the blessings which we desire so much. First, I should like to quote some of the philosophers. Plato said: "The first and best victory is to conquer self; to be conquered by self is, of all things, the most shameful and vile." And da Vinci once said: "You will never have a greater or lesser dominion than that over yourself." Then he goes on to say that "the height of a man's success is gauged by his self-mastery; the depth of his failure by his self-abandonment. . . . And this law is the expression of eternal justice. He who cannot establish dominion over himself will have no dominion over others." In other words,he cannot be a worthy father or leader. Solomon in all his wisdom made this meaningful statement: "He that is slow to anger is better than the mighty; and he that ruleth his spirit than he that taketh a city." (Proverbs 16:32) There are two important elements in self-mastery. The first is to determine your course or set the sails, so to speak, of moral standards; the other is the willpower, or the wind in the sails carrying one forward. As I said before, character is determined by the extent to which we can master ourselves toward good ends. It is difficult to say just what builds good character, but we know it when we see it. It always commands our admiration, and the absence of it our pity. But it is largely a matter of willpower.

N. Eldon Tanner (1898 - 1982)

Source: Ensign, May 1975, p. 75.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Moss Hart on boldness, caring, cities, and dreams

The only credential the city [New York] asked was the boldness to dream. For those who did, it unlocked its gates and its treasures, not caring who they were or where they came from.

Moss Hart (1904 - 1961)

Source: Act One, 1959

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Meredith Willson on cities, creation, genius, love, music, originality, people, and world

Regarding The Music Man, Jay Nordlinger wrote: The Music Man (for which Willson also wrote the lyrics) is an astonishing creation. It came in a spurt of brilliance. It is shot through with originality, verve, and-why not go all the way?-genius. People love it, can't get enough of it, can't stop performing it-and they are not wrong. For closing in on a half- century now, The Music Man has been performed continually, in every American city, town, and village, and in other parts of the world as well, not excluding Peking.

Meredith Willson (1902 - 1984)

Source: “One Vote for Willson,” by Jay Nordlinger, National Review Magazine; June 05, 2000

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Meredith Willson on cities, home, and music

Speaking of River City in The Music Man & his home town, Mason City, Iowa: I didn't have to make up anything. I simply remembered Mason City as closely as I could.

Meredith Willson (1902 - 1984)

Source: “One Vote for Willson,” by Jay Nordlinger, National Review Magazine; June 05, 2000

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Meredith Willson on cities, courage, freedom, loyalty, motives, purpose, spirituality, and strength

From the explanatory notes that Willson wrote to accompany his symphony, A Symphony of San Francisco,: "Generally speaking, the first movement is intended to convey pioneer courage, loyalty, strength of purpose and freedom." The trumpet motive in the closing Allegro "is a call of defiance to the very elements themselves that had the temerity to dispute the spiritual strength and courage of the golden city of the West."

Meredith Willson (1902 - 1984)

Source: “One Vote for Willson,” by Jay Nordlinger, National Review Magazine; June 05, 2000

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Mary McCarthy on argument, character, cities, food, life, and senses

The strongest argument for the unmaterialistic character of American life is . . . that we tolerate conditions that are, from a materialistic point of view, intolerable . . . the food we eat, the cramped apartments . . . the crowded subways. . . . American life, in large cities, at any rate, is a perpetual assault of the senses and the nerves; it is out of asceticism, out of unworldliness, precisely, that we bear it.

Mary McCarthy (1912 - 1989)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Martin Luther King, Jr. on catholicism, children, cities, day, freedom, god, men, spirituality, and words

And when this happens, when we allow freedom to ring, when we let it ring from every tenement and every hamlet, from every state and every city, we will be able to speed up that day when all of God's children, black men and white men, Jews and Gentiles, Protestants and Catholics, will be able to join hands and sing in the words of the old Negro spiritual, "Free at last, free at last. Thank God Almighty, we are free at last."

Martin Luther King Jr (1929 - 1968)

Source: Address at March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom (Aug 1963)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Martin Luther King, Jr. on christ, cities, freedom, home, injustice, jesus, justice, prophets, and world

I am in Birmingham because injustice is here. Just as the eighth century prophets left their little villages and carried their "thus saith the Lord" far beyond the boundaries of their home towns; and just as the Apostle Paul left his little village of Tarsus and carried the gospel of Jesus Christ to practically every hamlet and city of the Graeco-Roman world, I too am compelled to carry the gospel of freedom beyond my particular home town. Like Paul, I must constantly respond to the Macedonian call for aid.

Martin Luther King Jr (1929 - 1968)

Source: Letter from Birmingham Jail (April 1963)

Contributed by: Zaady

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