cities

A Quote by Alta on neighbors, neighborhoods, aidos, cities, suburbs, and saints

loving your neighbor is all very fine when you have nice neighbors. this is why people choose the town they live in. we all want nice neighbors. It's the folks in the NEXT town who are the bad guys. You'd be amazed at how citified folks hate the people in the suburbs. not the suburbs, the people in them. but would they want us living next door? i ask you.

& joan of arc was noisy. she must have made a lousy neighbor. & jesus, giving everything away – & ghandi, a walking guilt trip. some people make nicer neighbors than others. but there you have it. city planning.

funny how essays on politics, on war & peace, seem to talk about love.

Alta

Source: Cries of The Spirit, Pages: 56-57 (from 2 : 7)

Contributed by: Tsuya

A Quote by Edward Paul Abbey on cities, country, belonging, and home

A city man is a home anywhere, for all big cities are much alike. But a country man has a place where he belongs, where he always returns, and where, when the time comes, he is willing to die.

Edward Abbey (1927 - 1989)

Source: A Voice Crying in the Wilderness (Vox Clamantis in Deserto): Notes from a Secret Journal, Pages: 108

Contributed by: Tsuya

A Quote by Jesus on cities, rules, spirit, and victory

He who rules his spirit has won a greater victory than the taking of a city.

Jesus

Source: The Bible

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Winston Leonard Spencer Churchill on army, cities, and fighting

We shall defend every village, every town and every city. The vast mass of London itself, fought street by street, could easily devour an entire hostile army; and we would rather see London laid in ruins and ashes than that it should be tamely and abjectly enslaved.

Winston Churchill (1874 - 1965)

Source: Radio Broadcast, 14 July 1940

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on cities, conscience, cowardice, danger, gold, lies, obstacles, persuasion, reward, spirit, trust, and wives

FIRST MURDERER: WHERE IS THY CONSCIENCE NOW? SECOND MURDERER: In the Duke of Gloucester's purse FIRST MURDERER: So when he opens his purse to give us our reward, thy conscience flies out. SECOND MURDERER: Let it go; there's few or none will entertain it. FIRST MURDERER: How if it come to thee again? SECOND MURDERER: I'll not meddle with it: it is a dangerous thing: it makes a man a coward: a man cannot steal, but it accuseth him; he cannot swear, but it checks him; he cannot lie with his neighbour's wife, but it detects him: it is a blushing shamefast spirit that multiplies in a man's bosom; it fills one full of obstacles: it made me once restore a purse of gold, that I found: it beggars any man that keeps it: it is turned out of all towns and cities for a dangerous thing; and every man that means to live well, endeavours to trust to himself and to live without it. FIRST MURDERER: 'Zounds, it is even now at my elbow, persuading me not to kill the duke.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: King Richard III, Act I, scene iv

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Penn on cities, country, god, life, and men

The country life is to be preferred, for there we see the works of God, but in cities little else but the works of men.

William Penn (1644 - 1718)

Source: Reflexions and Maxims

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Jacob Holland on animals, cities, death, earth, eternity, life, and melancholy

When the moon shall have faded out from the sky, and the sun shall shine at noonday a dull cherry red, and the seas shall be frozen over, and the icecap shall have crept downward to the equator from either pole . . . when all the cities shall have long been dead and crumbled into dust, and all life shall be on the last verge of extinction on this globe; then, on a bit of lichen, growing on the bald rocks beside the eternal snows of Panama, shall be seated a tiny insect, preening its antennae in the glow of the worn-out sun, the sole survivor of animal life on this our earth - a melancholy bug.

William Jacob Holland (1814 - 1932)

Source: The Math Book

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Dunbar on art and cities

in

London, thou art the flower of cities all!

William Dunbar (c. 1465 - c. 1530)

Source: London

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Wheeler McMillen on animals, belief, blessings, children, cities, citizenship, communism, dance, earth, freedom, god, good, honor, labor, laws, liberty, magic, managers, men, men and women, miracles, nature, neighbors, peace, people, rules, sc

We are American farmers. We are Americans. We are farmers. Our grandsires freed this virgin continent,plowed it from East to West, and gave it to us.This land is for us and for our children tomake richer and more fruitful. We grow foods, fibers - fifteen times asmuch as we use. We grow men and women -- farmers, Presidents, and Senators, generals of industry,captains of commerce, missionaries, builders. Communists would call us capitalists, because we own land and we own tools. Capitalists might choose to call us laborers,because we work with our hands. Others may call us managers, because wedirect men and manage materials. Our children call us "Dad." We are also deacons, stockholders, mechanics, veterinarians, electricians, schoolboard members, Rotarians, voters, scientists,neighbors, men of good will. Our rules are Nature's rules, the laws of God. We command the magic of the seasons andthe miracles of science, because we obey Nature's rules. Our raw materials are soil and seed, animals, the atmosphere and the rain, and the mighty sun. We work with brains. We toil with musclesof steel, fed by the fires of lightning and byoils from the inner earth. We are partners with the laboratory, withthe factory, and with all the people. We provide industry with ever-renewableraw materials from the inexhaustible world ofplants. We buy products from the labor ofevery fellow-citizen.Our efficiencies have raised great cities andhappy towns, and have given all the peoplemeat and bread. We believe in work and in honor We believe in freedom. We are grateful for the American freedomthat has let us earn so many blessings. We know that liberty is our most preciouspossession. At the ballot-boxes and on thebattlefield we shall defend it. We have proven a new pattern of abun-dance. We pray that we may also help tomake a pattern for peace.

Wheeler McMillen

Source: American Farmers

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Walt Whitman on cities, good, and songs

A Song of the good green grass! A song no more of the city streets; A song of farms - a song of the soil of fields. A song with the smell of sun-dried hay, where the nimble pitchers handle the pitch-fork; A song tasting of new wheat, and of fresh-husk'd maize.

Walt Whitman (1819 - 1892)

Contributed by: Zaady

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