charm

A Quote by Gaius Plinius Caecilius Secundus Pliny, the Younger on charm and possessions

An object in possession seldom retains the same charm that it had in pursuit.

Pliny the Younger (c. 62 - c. 113)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Oliver Wendell Holmes on books, charm, justice, music, and thought

The best of a book is not the thought which it contains, but the thought which it suggests; just as the charm of music dwells not in the tones but in the echoes of our hearts.

Oliver Wendell Holmes (1809 - 1894)

Source: The Autocrat of the Breakfast Table

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A Quote by Oliver Goldsmith on art, charm, and heart

To me more dear, congenial to my heart, One native charm, than all the gloss of art.

Oliver Goldsmith (1728 - 1774)

Source: The Deserted Village

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A Quote by Dr. Nicholas Murray Butler on charm and day

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The forty-four-hour week has no charm for me. I'm looking for a forty-hour day.

Nicholas Butler (1862 - 1947)

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A Quote by Neil Gaiman on appearance, charm, evil, and good

You see with your eyes. This means you can be misled by charm, by outward appearance. By webs of glamour, by surface pretences. I do not see with my eyes. I see good and I see evil. Nothing else.

Neil Gaiman (1960 -)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Lyman Littlefield on adversity, affection, angels, blush, brides, charm, circumstances, crime, earth, evolution, existence, fatherhood, fortune, grace, health, heart, justice, kindness, life, mortality, motherhood, science, seasons, time, trus

The proudest monarch that ever wore a crown, or the most illustrious commander whose fortune it has been to subjugate empires, are melted into contrition when she who nursed the incipient fires of his mortal existence is passing from earth to be hidden from his gaze through the appointed seasons of revolving time. Even the obdurate and depraved turn to her with reverence, and though crime may have placed his feet upon the scaffold where his offense is to be expiated, yet even there the obdurate heart melts into contrition as regretful recollections crowd his bosom that his life had not been molded by the plastic hand of a mother's watchfulness and the words of gentle admonition that fell from her lips. We reverence father for his protection and justice, for sheltering abodes that have secured us from the pelting storms, for his continued kindness as we grow from infancy to manhood, for his wise counsels and expenditure of means, perhaps to polish and refine us with educational science, but through all these bestowments the mother's vigilance has been co-equal, and through all she has ministered as the guardian angel of our existence. Her gentle hand is remembered in every circumstance and condition that has intervened. In health she has spoken kindly congratulations and in sickness has patiently watched through the midnight vigils to bathe the burning brow and still the raging pulse with grateful emollients. She moves in a sphere where unselfish affection holds dominion and wins its votaries by the charms of gentleness and grace, which draw upon the most enduring sensibilities evolved in the bosom of mortals. The adoration that may be revealed in the responsive blushes that glow upon a maiden's cheek, may be more impulsive and brilliant, but cannot be more lasting or conducive to the perpetuity of more substantial benefits. The holy flame of a mother's devotion will burn on undiminished in its brightness, while that of the trusted bride and bridegroom may wane and be extinguished upon the bleak shores swept by the unwelcome winds of adversity.

Lyman Littlefield

Source: Lyman Littlefield Reminiscences (1888), p.135 - p.136

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Louise Beebe Wilder on charm, garden, kindness, power, and skill

A garden full of sweet odours is a garden full of charm, a most precious kind of charm not to be implanted by mere skill in horticulture or power of purse, and which is beyond explaining. It is born of sensitive and very personal preferences yet its appeal is almost universal.

Louise Beebe Wilder

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A Quote by Louisa May Alcott on charm, conceit, danger, genius, gifts, good, goodness, modesty, needs, power, and talent

You have a good many little gifts and virtues, but there is no need of parading them, for conceit spoils the finest genius. There is not much danger that real talent or goodness will be overlooked long, and the great charm of all power is modesty.

Louisa May Alcott (1832 - 1888)

Source: Amy March, in Little Women, pt. 2, ch. 16, 1869.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Louisa May Alcott on charm, conceit, danger, genius, goodness, modesty, power, and talent

Conceit spoils the finest genius. There is not much danger that real talent or goodness will be overlooked long; even if it is, the consciousness of possessing and using it well should satisfy one, and the great charm of all power is modesty.

Louisa May Alcott (1832 - 1888)

Source: Mrs. March to her daughter Amy, in Little Women, pt. 1, ch. 7, 1868.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron on charm, earth, and world

With thee all tales are sweet; each clime has charms; earth - sea alike - our world within our arms.

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Contributed by: Zaady

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