cats

A Quote by Oliver Herford on cats, dogs, and love

A cat is a pygmy lion who loves mice, hates dogs, and patronizes human beings.

Oliver Herford (1863 - 1935)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ogden Nash on cats and trouble

The trouble with a kitten is that eventually it becomes a cat.

Ogden Nash (1902 - 1971)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra on cats and play

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Those who will play with cats must expect to be scratched.

Miguel de Cervantes (1547 - 1616)

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A Quote by Michel Eyquem de Montaigne on cats, play, and sports

When I play with my cat, who knows whether I do not make her more sport than she makes me? When I play with my cat, who knows if I am not a pastime to her more than she is to me? When I play with my cat, who knows if I am not more of a pastime to her than she is to me?

Michel Montaigne (1533 - 1592)

Source: Essays

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A Quote by Mary Bly on cats and dogs

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Dogs come when they're called. Cats take a message and get back to you.

Mary Bly

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A Quote by Marsilio Ficino on cats, cities, and worth

A sturdy lad . . . who teams it, farms it . . . and always like a cat falls on his feet, is worth a hundred of these city dolls.

Marsilio Ficino (1433 - 1499)

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A Quote by Mark Twain on cats and learning

The man who sets out to carry a cat by its tail learns something that will always be useful and which never will grow dim or doubtful.

Mark Twain (1835 - 1910)

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A Quote by Mark Twain on acting, art, cats, chance, choice, day, death, feeling, jobs, judaism, justice, motherhood, painting, play, water, work, and zest

"So just you march right outdoors and start whitewashin' the fence. It will keep you out of mischief for a while at any' rate." "But, Ma," Sam protested, "this is Saturday." "Now do as I say!" Sam shuffled outside. Slowly he carried the long-handled brush and the whitewash to the sidewalk. There he looked at the board fence, 30 yards long and higher than his head. He dipped his brush and started stroking. The brush got heavier and heavier, and he had painted only half a board when he heard John Robards coming down the street, acting the parts of boat, captain and engine bells of the Big Missouri, drawing nine feet of water. Sam, now painting with zest, paid no attention to the vocal steamboat. He touched up each brushstroke, gazing at his work as if he were an artist. "I'm goin' swimmin'," John said, "but I reckon you can't, 'cause you got work to do, huh?" "You call this work? A boy doesn't get a chance to whitewash a fence every day," replied Sam, gingerly brushing a board with care. John watched for a few moments, then could stand it no longer. ''Here, Sam, let me whitewash a little." Sam explained that he would not dare entrust the job to anyone else. "I'll give you the core of my apple," John pleaded. "I'd like to, John, but . . ." "The whole of it?" Sam turned over the brush, took the apple and sat down in the shade, watching John, happily honored, whitewash furiously. Boy after boy came by that afternoon, all heading for the swimmin' hole. Yet each one stayed to outdo the others in the craft of whitewashing - paying Sam well for the chance. The afternoon was still young when Sam ran out of whitewash. The fence had three coats on it, and Sam had acquired an enormous stock of payments - part of a Jew's harp, a brass doorknob, a dead cat, 12 marbles, the handle of a knife and a kitten with one eye. When he called his mother to inspect the job, she allowed that she had underestimated her boy and, feeling self-reproach for it, gave him a choice apple and sent him off to play.

Mark Twain (1835 - 1910)

Source: Boyhood experiences that prepared him for his books.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Mark Twain on animals, army, buddhism, catholicism, cats, chaos, christianity, dogs, foolishness, friendship, learning, life, peace, salvation, simplicity, and truth

Man is the Reasoning Animal. Such is the claim. I think it is open to dispute. Indeed, my experiments have proven to me that he is the Unreasoning Animal . . . In truth, man is incurably foolish. Simple things which other animals easily learn, he is incapable of learning. Among my experiments was this. In an hour I taught a cat and a dog to be friends. I put them in a cage. In another hour I taught them to be friends with a rabbit. In the course of two days I was able to add a fox, a goose, a squirrel and some doves. Finally a monkey. They lived together in peace; even affectionately. Next, in another cage I confined an Irish Catholic from Tipperary, and as soon as he seemed tame I added a Scotch Presbyterian from Aberdeen. Next a Turk from Constantinople; a Greek Christian from Crete; an Armenian; a Methodist from the wilds of Arkansas; a Buddhist from China; a Brahman from Benares. Finally, a Salvation Army Colonel from Wapping. Then I stayed away for two whole days. When I came back to note results, the cage of Higher Animals was all right, but in the other there was but a chaos of gory odds and ends of turbans and fezzes and plaids and bones and flesh-not a specimen left alive. These Reasoning Animals had disagreed on a theological detail and carried the matter to a Higher Court.

Mark Twain (1835 - 1910)

Source: Mark Twain, Letters from the Earth, A Fawcett Crest Book, Greenwich, Conn., 1962

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Mark Twain on cats, lies, and life

One of the most striking differences between a cat and a lie is that the cat has only nine lives.

Mark Twain (1835 - 1910)

Source: Pudd'nhead Wilson

Contributed by: Zaady

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