books

A Quote by Alfred North Whitehead on books, civilization, habits, opposites, people, and thinking

It is a profoundly erroneous truism, repeated by all copy books and by eminent people when they are making speeches, that we should cultivate the habit of thinking of what we are doing. The precise opposite is the case. Civilization advances by extending the number of important operations which we can perform without thinking about them.

Alfred Whitehead (1861 - 1947)

Source: An Introduction to Mathematics.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alfred Hitchcock on books

in

This paperback is very interesting, but I find it will never replace a hardcover book - it makes a very poor doorstop.

Alfred Hitchcock (1899 - 1980)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alfred Hitchcock on books

in

The paperback is very interesting, but I find it will never replace the hardcover book-it makes a very poor doorstop.

Alfred Hitchcock (1899 - 1980)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alfred Dunhill on books and home

in

Give a man a pipe he can smoke, Give a man a book he can read, And his home is bright with a calm delight, Though the room be poor indeed.

Alfred Dunhill

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alfred Adler on books, company, economics, friendship, lawyers, mathematics, work, and writers

In the company of friends, writers can discuss their books, economists the state of the economy, lawyers their latest cases, and businessmen their latest acquisitions, but mathematicians cannot discuss their mathematics at all. And the more profound their work, the less understandable it is.

Alfred Adler (1870 - 1937)

Source: Reflections: mathematics and creativity, New Yorker, 47(1972), no. 53, 39 - 45.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alexander Pope on books, fortune, manners, and principles

Manners with fortunes, humours turn with climes, Tenets with books, and principles with times.

Alexander Pope (1688 - 1744)

Source: Moral Essays. Epistle i. Line 172.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alexander Pope on books, extremism, fate, and men

The fate of all extremes is such Men may be read, as well as books, too much. To observations which ourselves we make, We grow more partial for th' observer's sake.

Alexander Pope (1688 - 1744)

Source: Moral Essays, 1720-1735, Epistle I, To Lord Cobham, 1734

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alexander Pope on age, books, children, emptiness, gold, laws, life, nature, play, prayer, and youth

Behold the child, by Nature's kindly law, Pleased with a rattle, tickled with a straw; Some livelier plaything gives his youth delight, A little louder, but as empty quite; Scarfs, garters, gold, amuse his riper stage, And beads and prayer-books are the toys of age. Pleased with this bauble still, as that before, Till tired he sleeps, and life's poor play is o'er.

Alexander Pope (1688 - 1744)

Source: Essay on Man. Epistle ii. Line 274.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alexander Pope on books and learning

The bookful blockhead ignorantly read, With loads of learned lumber in his head, With his own tongue still edifies his ears, And always list'ning to himself appears. All books he reads, and all he reads assails.

Alexander Pope (1688 - 1744)

Source: Essay on Criticism. Part i. Line 53.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alexander Pope on books, fate, heaven, and present

Heaven from all creatures hides the book of Fate, All but the page prescrib'd, their present state.

Alexander Pope (1688 - 1744)

Source: Essay on Man. Epistle i. Line 77.

Contributed by: Zaady

Syndicate content