bitterness

A Quote by John Ruskin on bitterness and quality

The bitterness of poor quality Lingers long after The sweetness of low price is forgotten.

John Ruskin (1819 - 1900)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Ruskin on bitterness, darkness, evil, and nature

Of all the things that oppress me, this sense of the evil working of nature herself - my disgust at her barbarity -clumsiness - darkness - bitter mockery of herself - is the most desolating.

John Ruskin (1819 - 1900)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Milton on bitterness and revenge

Revenge, at first though sweet, Bitter ere long back on itself recoils.

John Milton (1608 - 1674)

Source: Paradise Lost. Book ix. Line 171.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Milton on bitterness, conscience, despair, and memory

Now conscience wakes despair That slumber'd,--wakes the bitter memory Of what he was, what is, and what must be Worse.

John Milton (1608 - 1674)

Source: Paradise Lost. Book iv. Line 23.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Milton on army, bitterness, certainty, change, extremism, and time

A gulf profound as that Serbonian bog Betwixt Damiata and Mount Casius old, Where armies whole have sunk: the parching air Burns frore, and cold performs th' effect of fire. Thither by harpy-footed Furies hal'd, At certain revolutions all the damn'd Are brought, and feel by turns the bitter change Of fierce extremes,--extremes by change more fierce; From beds of raging fire to starve in ice Their soft ethereal warmth, and there to pine Immovable, infix'd, and frozen round, Periods of time; thence hurried back to fire.

John Milton (1608 - 1674)

Source: Paradise Lost. Book ii. Line 592.

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A Quote by John Keats on bitterness, death, desires, enemies, heart, lies, mortality, poets, power, water, and words

This Grave contains all that was Mortal of a Young English Poet Who on his Death Bed in the Bitterness of his Heart at the Malicious Power of his Enemies Desired these words to be engraved on his Tomb Stone "Here lies One Whose Name was writ in Water."

John Keats (1795 - 1821)

Source: (Protestant Cemetery; Rome, Italy)

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A Quote by John Fitzgerald Kennedy on bitterness, discipline, friendship, generations, home, human rights, nations, peace, time, war, and world

Let the word go forth from this time and place, to friend and foe alike, that the torch has been passed to a new generation of Americans, born in this century, tempered by war, disciplined by a hard and bitter peace, proud of our ancient heritage, and unwilling to witness or permit the slow undoing of those human rights to which this nation has always been committed, and to which we are committed today, at home and around the world!

John F. Kennedy (1917 - 1963)

Source: Inaugural Address, 1961

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Joaquin Miller on bitterness, cities, country, death, good, heart, lies, men, motherhood, nature, order, poetry, time, traditions, and water

Oregon proper is a sort of nut - a nut with a sweet, rich kernel, but also with a bitter bark and rind-through which you have to gnaw in order to reach the kernel. Portland is the bark or rind. The rich heart of the richest young State in the Union lies nearly two hundred miles in the interior. Portland sits at the seadoor - the very gates of the State. The Orient has met the Occident here in this westmost town. One of these new men, speculator in town lots and land, who was clad in a slouch hat and enormous mud-boots reaching almost to the knees, approached me in Portland. He carried an umbrella thrust up under his arm, while his two forefingers hooked and wrestled resolutely together as he stood before me. He chewed tobacco violently, and now and then fired a brown stream far up and down the new pine sidewalk. "Can't you put this city into poetry? Yes, you kin. What's poetry good for, if it can't rize the price of land? Jist tell 'em we never had a shake. Yes, an' tell 'em that the old men never die; but jist git kivered with moss and blow away. An' tell 'em - yes tell 'em that the timber grows so tall that it takes a man an' two small boys to see to the top of a tree! Yes, an' tell 'em that we have to tie poles to the cows' horns, to let the wrinkles run out on. Yes, biggest country, richest country an' dogondest healthiest country this side of Jerichol! Yes, it is." Drip! drip! drip! Slop! slop! slop! incessantly and all the time, for an uninterrupted half a year, here in this mossy, moldy town of Portland. Rain! rain! rain! until the trees grow out of the cracks and roofs of the houses, and until, tradition says, Mother Nature comes to the aid of the inhabitants and makes them web-footed, like the water-fowl. And even then, and in the face of all this, this man stood up before me with the water fairly bending his umbrella from the weight of the rain - the rain running down his nose, his head, his hair - and there he smilingly bowed and protested that it did not really rain much in Portland; but that down about the mouth of the Columbia, at Astoria, it did "sometimes rain a-right smart."

Joaquin Miller (1837 - 1914)

Source: The New and the Old

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Joan Rivers on anger, bitterness, experience, fear, feeling, and grief

Anger is a symptom, a way of cloaking and expressing feelings too awful to experience directly - hurt, bitterness, grief, and, mostof all, fear.

Joan Rivers (1933 -)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by James Whitcomb Riley on bitterness, caring, curiosity, god, good, and world

Oh, the world's a curious compound, with its honey and its gall, With its cares and bitter crosses, but a good world after all. An' a good God must have made it-leastways, that is what I say, When a hand is on my shoulder in a friendly sort o'way.

James Whitcomb Riley (1849 - 1916)

Contributed by: Zaady

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