birth

A Quote by Phillips Brooks on angels, birth, blessings, christ, darkness, earth, fear, gifts, god, hope, lies, love, men, peace, silence, sleep, soul, and world

O little town of Bethlehem, How still we see thee lie; Above thy deep and dreamless sleep The silent stars go by; Yet in thy dark streets shineth The everlasting Light. The hopes and fears of all the years Are met in thee tonight. For Christ is born of Mary, And, gathered all above While mortals sleep,the angels keep Their watch of wond'ring love. O morning stars, together Proclaim the holy birth, And praises sing to God the King, And peace to men on earth. How silently, how silently The wondrous gift is giv'n! So God imparts to human hearts The blessings of his heav'n. No ear may hear his coming; But in this world of sin, Where meek souls will receive him, still The dear Christ enters in.

Phillips Brooks (1835 - 1893)

Source: O little town of Bethlehem, 1867

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Norman Cousins on birth, fame, history, ideas, libraries, life, and metaphor

A library, to modify the famous metaphor of Socrates, should be the delivery room for the birth of ideas a place where history comes to life.

Norman Cousins (1912 - 1990)

Source: American Library Association "Bulletin," October 1954

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Norman Cousins on birth, books, fame, history, ideas, libraries, life, literature, metaphor, and worship

The library is not a shrine for the worship of books. It is not a temple where literary incense must be burned or where one's one devotion to the bound book is expressed in ritual. A library, to modify the famous metaphor of Socrates, should be the delivery room for the birth of ideas - a place where history comes to life.

Norman Cousins (1912 - 1990)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Dr. Nicholas Murray Butler on authority, birth, civilization, economics, freedom, injustice, labor, life, limitations, order, time, and world

Every attempt, by whatever authority, to fix a maximum of productive labor by a given worker in a given time is an unjust restriction upon his freedom and a limitation of his right to make the most of himself in order that he may rise in the scale of the social and economic order in which he lives. The notion that all human beings born into this world enter at birth into a definite social and economic classification, in which classification they must remain permanently through life, is wholly false and fatal to a progressive civilization.

Nicholas Butler (1862 - 1947)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Neal A. Maxwell on birth, darkness, deed, health, parenthood, people, and words

Ironically, as some people become harder, they use softer words to describe dark deeds. This, too, is part of being sedated by secularism. Needless abortion, for instance, is a "reproductive health procedure, . . ." "Illegitimacy" gives way to the wholly sanitized words "non-marital birth" or "alternative parenting."

Neal Maxwell (1926 -)

Source: ENSIGN, May 1996, p. 68, © by Intellectual Reserve, Inc. Used by permission.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Mazie Dunham on belief, birth, and life

I believe in life after birth!

Mazie Dunham

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by May Sarton on birth, creativity, death, garden, good, growth, and mystery

In the garden the door is always open into the "holy" - growth, birth, death. Every flower holds the whole mystery in its short cycle, and in the garden we are never far away from death, the fertilizing, good, creative death.

May Sarton

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Matthew Arnold on birth and time

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A wanderer is man from his birth. He was born in a ship On the breast of the river of Time.

Matthew Arnold (1822 - 1888)

Source: The Future

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Matthew Arnold on birth, earth, heart, and tears

He spoke, and loos'd our heart in tears. He laid us as we lay at birth On the cool flowery lap of earth.

Matthew Arnold (1822 - 1888)

Source: Memorial Verses

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley on birth and failure

From my birth I have aspired like the eagle - but unlike the eagle, my wings have failed. . . . Congratulate me then that I have found a fitting scope for my powers.

Mary Shelley (1797 - 1851)

Contributed by: Zaady

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